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" ... the transcendent law of nature and of nature's God, which declares that the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed. "
Beyond the Pledge of Allegiance: Hostility to Religious Expression in the ... - Página 28
por United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Property Rights, United States - 2005 - 184 páginas
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The Rending of Virginia: A History

Granville Davisson Hall - 1901 - 630 páginas
...greater and supreme law declared in the Convention by Mr. Madison : "The transcendent law of nature and nature's God which declares that the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed" if they...
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The Rending of Virginia

Granville Davisson Hall - 1902
...greater and supreme law declared in the Convention by Mr. Madison: "The transcendent law of nature and nature's God which declares that the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed" if they...
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Harper's Encyclopædia of United States History from 458 A.D. to 1906, Volumen8

Benson John Lossing - 1905
...compact among the States, can be superseded without the unanimous consent of the parties to it?" answers: "By recurring to the absolute necessity of the case;...the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed." Thus...
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The Constitution of the United States: Its History Application and ..., Volumen2

David Kemper Watson - 1910 - 1959 páginas
...ratifying the Constitution, and the remaining few who do not become parties to it? "The first question is answered at once, by recurring to the absolute necessity...the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed. Perhaps,...
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The Doctrine of Judicial Review, Its Legal and Historical Basis, and Other ...

Edward Samuel Corwin - 1914 - 177 páginas
...ratifying the Constitution, and the remaining few who do not become parties to it? The first question is answered at once by recurring to the absolute necessity...the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed." II...
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Selections from the Federalist

William Bennett Munro - 1914 - 202 páginas
...ratifying the Constitution, and the remaining few who do not become parties to it ? The first question is answered at once by recurring to the absolute necessity...the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed. PERHAPS,...
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Richardson's Defense of the South

John Anderson Richardson - 1914 - 598 páginas
...be superseded without the uanimous consent of the parties to it?" He answers his own question thus: "By recurring to the absolute necessity of the case...self-preservation ; to the transcendent law of nature and nature's God, which declares that the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all...
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The American Plan of Government: The Constitution of the United States as ...

Charles William Bacon, Franklyn Stanley Morse - 1916 - 474 páginas
...ratifying the Constitution, and the remaining few who do not become parties to it? "The first question is answered at once by recurring to the absolute necessity...the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed. Perhaps,...
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The Constitutional Review, Volúmenes4-5

1920
...can be superseded without the unanimous consent of the parties to it." This question, he says, "is answered at once by recurring to the absolute necessity of the case, the great principle of self-preservation, to the transcendent law of nature and of nature's God which...
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Jefferson Davis, Constitutionalist: His Letters, Papers, and Speeches, Volumen9

Jefferson Davis - 1923
...can be superseded without the unanimous consent of the parties to it?" He answers this question ' ' by recurring to the absolute necessity of the case...the safety and happiness of society are the objects at which all political institutions aim, and to which all such institutions must be sacrificed. ' '...
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