Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

In deep Glenfinlas' moonlight glade,

Say, rode ye on the eddying smoke, A lovely maid in vest of green:

Or saild ye on the midnight wind i

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

And we-behind the Chieftain's shield,

No more shall we in safety dwell; None leads the people to the field

And we the loud lament must swell.

O hone a rie'! O hone a rie'!

The pride of Albin's line is o'er!
And fall’n Glenartney's stateliest tree;

We ne'er shall see Lord Ronald more!

“Lewis's collection produced also what Scott justly calls makes a German use of his Scottish materials; that the le his first serious attempts in verse;' and of these the earliest gend, as briefly told in the simple prose of his preface, is more appears to have been the Glenfinlas. Here the scene is laid in affecting than the lofty and sonorous stanzas themselves; that the most favourite district of his favourite Perthshire High- the vague terror of the original dream loses, instead of gaining, lands; and the Gaelic tradition on which it is founded was far by the expanded elaboration of the detail. There may be more likely to draw out the secret strength of his genius, as something in these objections: but no man can pretend to be well as to arrest the feelings of his countrymen, than any sub- an impartial critic of the piece which first awoke his own ject with which the stores of German diablerie could have childish ear to the power of poetry and the melody of verse." supplied him. It has been alleged, however, that the poet - Life of Scott, vol. ii. p. 25.

APPENDIX.

NOTE A.

NOTE D.

How blazed Lord Ronald's beltane-tree.-P. 587.

And thrice Sl. Fillan's powerful prayer.-P. 589.

The fires lighted by the Highlanders, on the first of May, St. Fillan has given his name to many chapels, holy foun. in compliance with a custom derived from the Pagan times, tains, &c. in Scotland. He was, according to Camerarius, an are termed The Beltane-tree. It is a festival celebrated with Abbot of Pittenweem, in Fife; from which situation he retired, various superstitious rites, both in the north of Scotland and and died a hermit in the wilds of Glenurchy, A.D. 649. While in Wales.

engaged in transcribing the Scriptures, his left hand was observed to send forth such a splendour, as to afford light to that with which he wrote; a miracle which sared many can

dles to the convent, as St. Fillan used to spend whole nights NOTE B.

in that exercise. The 9th of January was dedicated to this

saint, who gave his name to Kilfillan, in Renfrew, and St. The seer's prophetic spirit found.-P. 587.

Phillany, or Forgend, in Fife. Lesley, lib. 7, tells us, that

Robert the Bruce was possessed of Fillan's miraculous and I can only describe the second sight, by adopting Dr. John- luminous arm, which he enclosed in a silver shrine, and had son's definition, who calls it “ An impression, either by the it carried at the head of his army. Previous to the Battle of mind upon the eye, or by the eye upon the mind, by which Bannockburn, the king's chaplain, a man of little faith, ah things distant and future are perceived and seen as if they stracted the relict, and deposited it in a place of security, lest were present." To which I would only add, that the spec- it should fall into the hands of the English. But, lo! while tral appearances, thus presented, usually presage misfortune ; | Robert was addressing his prayers to the empty casket, it was that the faculty is painful to those who suppose they possess observed to open and shut suddenly; and, on inspection, the it; and that they usually acquire it while themselves under saint was found to have himself deposited his arm in the the pressure of melancholy.

shrine as an assurance of victory. Such is the tale of Lesley. But though Bruce little needed that the arm of St. Fillan should assist his own, he dedicated to him, in gratitude, a

priory at Killin, upon Loch Tay. NOTE C.

In the Scots Magazine for July, 18112, there is a copy of a

very curious crown grant, dated 11th July, 1487, by which Will good St. Oran's rule prevail 7–P. 588.

James III. confirms, to Malice Doire, an inhabitant of Strath

fillan, in Perthshire, the peaceable exercise and enjoyment St. Oran was a friend and follower of St. Columba, and was of a relic of St. Fillan, being apparently the head of a pastoburied at Icolmkill. His pretensions to be a saint were ra- ral staff called the Quegrich, which he and his predecessors ther dubious. According to the legend, he consented to be are said to have possessed since the days of Robert Bruce. buried alive, in order to propitiate certain demons of the soil, As the Quegrich was used to cure discases, this document is who obstructed the attempts of Columba to build a chapel. probably the most ancient patent ever granted for a quack Columba caused the body of his friend to be dug up, after medicine. The ingenious correspondent, by whom it is furIliree days had elapsed; when Oran, to the horror and scan- nished, farther observes, that additional particulars, concerne dal of the assistants, declared, that there was neither a God, ing St. Fillan, are to be found in BELLENDEN'S Boece, Book 4, a judgment, nor a future state! He had no time to make folio ccxiii., and in PENNANT'S Tour in Scolland, 1772, pp. further discoveries, for Columba caused the earth once more 11, 15. to be shorelled over him with the utmost despatch. The cha- See a note on the lines in the first canto of Marmion. pel, however, and the cemetry, was called Relig Ouran; and, in memory of his rigid celibacy, no female was permitted “ Thence to St. Fillan's blessed well, to pay her devotions, or be buried in that place. This is the

Whose spring can frenzied dreams dispel, rule alluded to in the poom.

And the crazed brain restore," &c.-ED.

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »