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be more intrepid than he should be to face for December the first of a series of arthe acid test of derivative and word root. ticles on Eugenics. Another subject on

which he will have an article is that of I can hardly believe my eyes yet when I

chain stores, possibly the most spectacread in his article, page 480, September WORLD'S WORK, the following:

ular phase of the tremendous develop

ment in recent years of the handling of In fact, the successful outcome of industry small commodity and merchandise by depends upon certain moral standards. Take thrift, a higher standard of honor, the keeping

means of neighborhood shops throughout of a man's word, steadiness, sobriety, a recog

the country. nition of honorable dealings—all these have been brought into the life of civilized nations not by Christianity but by Industrialism.

“The Little Read School Marm," by Moral standards—moral is a word from

Ernest Greenwood, which will appear in mos, Latin for customs, manners, modes of the World's Work for December, deals

Morals are therefore self-evidently with a question at various times widely secondary, postquential, sequential-never in discussed but still existent. The salaries any sense antecedent to man or his manner,

of teachers and clergymen have long his customs, his modes. Morals only take on

been the cause of much criticism and the idea of virtue according as truthfulness; rightly so, since they are in too many honesty, justice, kindness, generosity, and charity begin to develop and beautify them.

cases entirely inadequate pittances and Morals may be bad. There can be but one

a reproach to a people who are not dissource of truthfulness, honesty, justice, kind- tinguished for niggardliness but who someness, generosity, and charity, and that is true how have acquired the belief that the two religion. There can be but one true religion, noblest of vocations of service may be self-evidently, and that is the system of morals pursued on kind words and commendathat Christ propagated in his teachings. No tions. It is not surprising that many other ever tuned in on station God and found

teachers know little more than their the commandment “Thou shalt love thy pupils. How can they fit themselves neighbor as thyself.” "Not by Christianity but by Industrial

to instruct when they have but the ism!” What an inversion of reasoning!

barest wherewithal of support? It is Nothing great ever found its way into the not incredible that most of them are world or helped to civilize it except through actually uneducated, incompetent to act the mind and soul of some one man. Inspira- as stenographers or bookkeepers, but this tion finds its conduit in the individual-not incompetency may be laid at the doors the mass. But Industrialism is of the mass. of those parents who refuse to believe It is a collective and composite concept-self- that teachers like other beings require evidently. It is an e-man-ation (from manus,

the necessities and some of the luxuries meaning hand) of what the mind and soul of

of life. men have directed or willed the hand to do. It is so obviously postquential as to make it ab

vs. surd to credit it with creative function or influence. It is manifestly what men with

In the World's Work for December, minds and souls have made it-not it them.

Chester H. Rowell, in the first article of It is merely the result of potentials long ante

a series on the United States Governcedent, to “thrift, a higher sense of honor, the ment, makes the point that in Congress keeping of a man's word, steadiness, sobriety, to-day there are probably just as many a recognition of honorable dealings"-each of men of ability as there were a quarterwhich presupposes brotherhood.

century ago, but that the development Edward, how could you?

of Congressional complications has been OSSO

such during these twenty-five years

that these individuals are not able French Strother, who concludes in this to achieve distinction. In the ensuing issue his series of articles on “The Cause articles he will discuss the question of of Crime," writes in the World's WORK the appearance of cabinet officers before

a

114

Should the Constitution Be Amended ?

Congress, a thing forbidden by our creation, tremendously interesting and present laws, the new budget system, potentially extremely significant. and other flaws in the present function- Boris Kustodiev, whose portrait of ing of our Government. Mr. Rowell's Feodor Shaliapin forms the frontispiece articles will differ from previous discus- of the magazine, is a member of the Acadsions of this subject in that he has writ- emy of Fine Arts of Petrograd and has ten them in such a way that they are exhibited widely in Europe since 1902. easily comprehensible to any public and He studied at the Academy under Repin. not to a small and specialized group.

Nikolai Bogdanov-Bielski, also a member of the Academy, has exhibited since

1889 in Russia and Germany. There are games and games: boot

Sergei Vinogradov has exhibited in Ruslegging, booklegging, and now that third

sia since 1892 and in Paris and Berlin, major sport of one type of individual in

where in 1909 he won the gold medal of

the international exhibition of that year. this country, immigrant-smuggling. These aliens, unable to enter the country by the He, as well, is a member of the Academy. usual channels, are guilefully introduced

OSSO under the auspices of gangs who do not hesitate to kill their cargoes if the law

This letter from Dr. Davis, General surprises them. This game is far more Secretary of the Bureau of Social Hygicne exciting than the liquor traffic and it has

in New York City, calls attention to an many followers. James C. Young dis

error in the phraseology of a statement cusses it in this issue in his article, made by Rollin Lynde Hartt in his first "Breaking into the United States."

article on "The Habit of Getting Di

vorces." As he says, it is a colorful trade.

To the Editor, World's WORK.
OS SO

Sir: In the issues of the World's WORK

of August and September there appears an We are fortunate in being able to re

article on “The Habit of Getting Divorces," produce in full color in this issue five by Rollin Lynde Hartt in which he quotes me pictures of the Russian Art exhibition at several points. held last winter in New York. The pur- The questionnaire study to which he refers pose of that exhibition was two-fold, to listed the causes alleged by 116 women who offer a generous perspective of Russian were unhappy in their married life, but very few æsthetic activity and to render material of whom had sought for à remedy in divorce. assistance to those Russian artists who Of the 134 reasons alleged for unhappiness, are actually in severe want. To those of only 27 per cent. were stated as directly due

to sexual maladjustment. In this connection us who witnessed the pictures, there was

I referred to the fact that Judge Hoffman had one thing that impressed us above all

publicly stated that he believed sexual malothers: a vitality and a gorgeous and

adjustment to be the real difficulty in the living handling of color the more striking majority of divorce cases. I am positive that for the fact that, in the exhibitions of the I did not use the term “physical mismating," work of two distinguished men being held because it is only one and perhaps a very minor at the same time, these characteristics one of the factors which may be included in were less noticeable than any other.

the term "sexual maladjustment,” and I cerThe art as exemplified by these pictures tainly did not quote Judge Hoffman as having is perhaps less easy to understand for the

used this expression. Sexual maladjustment layman of this country than is the art of

involves very many factors. My reason for Besnard or Sargent. It is less restrained, objecting to Mr. Hartt's phrasing of the mat

ter is that the phrase he uses does not express infinitely more ebullient. But it is, for

,

my own belief, for I do not believe any such the same reason, possibly, infinitely more

statement would be scientific. refreshing. One left the galleries feeling

Very truly yours, that one had been privileged to see sincere

KATHARINE BEMENT Davis.

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DECEMBER, 1924 FRONTISPIECE: VILLAGE BOYS

Nikolai Bogdanov-Bielski 116 THE MARCH OF EVENTS

117 An Editorial Interpretation THE LITTLE Things That Make Ford's RailROAD A BIG SUCCESS

Samuel Crowther 130 ALONG Ford's RAILWAY (Pluotogrcpbs)

137 IN THE PATH OF THE LEGIONS (Photographs of Ancient Carthage)

140 PERSONALITIES:

146 S. Parker Gilbert, Thinking Machine Frank Morrison, Labor Leader

C. E. Eveleth, Industrial Philosopher THE NEXT STEP IN WASHINGTON

Chester H. Rowell 155 1. Responsible Leadership in the Government THE LITTLE READ SCHOOL MARM

Ernest Greenwood 164 CRIME AND EUGENICS

French Strother 168 TWENTY CENTURIES BEFORE ABRAHAM

175 New LiGHT ON THE Bible From ExcavaTIONS AT UR (A Story in Pictures) 177 THE JUNGLE PENGUIN (A Record of the Camera)

192 THE BIRD THAT BURROWS

Frank M. Chapman 193 SHORT SHIFTS IN Public LiFe

Mark Sullivan 197 THE TRUTH ACOUT THE NEWSPAPERS

Carl C. Dickey 203 IV. Dragoons of the Press Do You BUY FROM A “CHAIN”?

212 FIRST INVESTMENT PRINCIPLES

219 INVESTING FAMILY SAVINGS

221 THE COWBOY CYCLE

Cameron Rogers 222 THE World's WORKSHOP

226 Glimpses Behind the Scenes in the Editor's Ofñce

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Copyright, 1924, in tha United States, Newfoundland, Great Britain, and other countries by Doubleday, Page & Co. All rights

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NELSON DOL'BLEDAY, Vice-President S. A. EVERITT. Treasures ARTICR W. PACE, Vice-President RUSSELL DOUBLEDAY, Secrctary

JOHN J. HESSIAN, Aas't. Treasurer

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O

N THE same day that the Until the appearance of Senator La

King of England sum- Follette as a Presidential candidate, it moned Mr. Stanley Baldwin had not taken shape as a distinct national to form a new government political party. It had made its presence

for Great Britain, the Ameri- known rather by factional cleavage within can people overwhelmingly chose Calvin the long established organizations. InCoolidge President. These two events surgent “ blocs" were organized in Conare not_so unconnected as they may gress and candidates of farmer-labor seem. The most important political con- groups were elected from certain states. sequence of the War, and to many ob- The presence of large alien populations servers perhaps the most disconcerting in the great cities, the increasing demands was the rise of radicalism. Its extremist of labor, and the bitterness supposed to manifestation was in the old Russian have been left by the War in the hearts of Empire, but the movement, in its several a considerable pro-German populationphases, gained headway in practically these elements of discord in the national every country. In the more stable life had led many to believe that the time lands-France, Great Britain, and the had come to form a “third party" in this United States—the so-called "wave of country, constructed somewhat on the radicalism" did not attain its height until lines of the Labor party in England. The the last twelvemonth. In France the triumph of Ramsay Macdonald, it was Socialist and pacifist, almost “defeatist” urged, would soon be duplicated in the government of Herriot supplanted the United States. The movement of porigid, unyielding coalition of Poincaré, litical life in all countries was in the diwhile in Great Britain that political rection of radicalism; the old parties, both spectre which had for years been feared, in England and in this country-so the but hardly expected, a Labor or “Social- argument ran-had outlived their usefulist” ministry, came into power under Mr. ness; the growing “class consciousness” Ramsay Macdonald.

of the masses must needs find more adeIn the United States “radicalism” quate expression than in the old parties, assumed no such definite form as this. which had become mere strongholds of

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