The History of Tom Jones: A Foundling

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Century, 1906 - 15 páginas
 

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Crítica de los usuarios  - pjskimin - LibraryThing

Picked up this entire set in excellent condition at a library sponsored used book sale for $60.00. hands down one of my best finds. Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - donbuch1 - LibraryThing

This classic series represents the Western canon not without academic controversy. The latest volumes of the Great Books include some women writers, but they are still definitely underrepresented ... Leer comentario completo

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Página v - Let humble Allen, with an awkward shame, Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.
Página 107 - Her pure and eloquent blood Spoke in her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought, That one might almost say her body thought.
Página 11 - ... an old ruined abbey, grown over with ivy, and part of the front, which remained still entire. The left-hand scene presented the view of a very fine park, com1 posed of very unequal ground, and agreeably varied with all the ' diversity that hills, lawns, wood, and water, laid out with admirable / taste, but owing less to art than to nature, could give. Beyond this, the country gradually rose into a ridge of wild mountains, the tops of which were above the clouds.
Página 206 - I desire of the philosophers to grant, that there is in some (I believe in many) human breasts a kind and benevolent disposition, which is gratified by contributing to the happiness of others.
Página 394 - Again, there is another sort of knowledge, beyond the power o"f learning to bestow, and this is to be had by conversation. So necessary is this to the understanding the characters of men...
Página 322 - ... with in the home articles of a newspaper. Nor must he be inhibited from showing many persons and things, which may possibly have never fallen within the knowledge of great part of his readers. If the writer strictly observes the rules above-mentioned, he hath discharged his part; and is then entitled to some faith from his reader, who is indeed guilty of critical infidelity if he disbelieves him.
Página 316 - ... different complexions are here apt to run into very different extremes ; for while some are, with M. Dacier, ready to allow, that the same thing which is impossible may be yet probable,.]. others have so little historic or poetic faith, that they believe nothing to be either possible or probable, the like to which hath not occurred to their own observation.
Página 322 - For though every good author will confine himself within the bounds of probability, it is by no means necessary that his characters, or his incidents, should be trite, common, or vulgar; such as happen in every street, or in every house, or which may be met with in the home articles of a newspaper. Nor must he be inhibited from showing many persons and things, which may possibly have never fallen within the knowledge of great part of his readers. If the writer strictly observes the rules...
Página 107 - She was most like the picture of Lady Ranelagh: and, I have heard, more still to the famous duchess of Mazarine ; but most of all she resembled one whose image never can depart from my breast, and whom, if thou dost remember, thou hast then, my friend, an adequate idea of Sophia.
Página 4 - ... alleys under the same name. In reality, true nature is as difficult to be met with in authors as the Bayonne ham, or Bologna sausage, is to be found in the shops. But the whole, to continue the same metaphor, consists in the cookery of the author ; for, as Mr. Pope tells us, " True wit is nature to advantage drest ; What oft was thought, but ne'er so well exprest.

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