The History of the Union, and of the Constitution: Being the Substance of Three Lectures on the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Constitutional Periods of American History, with an Appendix Containing the Constitution of the United States, and the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of '98

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Van Evrie, Horton, 1863 - 92 páginas
This volume contains a series of interesting lectures about the history of the United States and its Constitution. Many of the lectures explore the philosophical nature of being "free" and having "rights," noting historic figures like Daniel Webster, who once declared that: "The quantity of liberty we possess is precisely equal to the quantity of restraint which we put upon the government." Lectures include "The Saxon and Norman Principles of Government," "History of the Union" and "History of the Constitution."
 

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Página 71 - The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so, construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular state. SECTION 4. The United States shall guarantee to every state in this Union, a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion, and on application of the legislature, or of the...
Página 55 - That the Government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Página 64 - No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen. The Vice-President of the United States shall be president of the senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided.
Página 29 - The said States hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade or any other pretence whatever...
Página 68 - In every case, after the choice of the president, the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the vice-president. But if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from them by ballot the vice-president.]* The congress may determine the time of choosing the electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes ; which day shall be the same throughout the United States.
Página 62 - WE the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this CONSTITUTION for the United States of America.
Página 64 - When vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies. The House of Representatives shall choose their speaker and other officers ; and shall have the sole power of impeachment. SECTION 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legislature thereof for six years; and each senator shall have one vote.
Página 62 - When but an idle boy, I sought its grateful shade; In all their gushing joy Here, too, my sisters played. My mother kissed me here; My father pressed my hand — Forgive this foolish tear, But let that old oak stand.
Página 17 - They planted by your care ! No, your oppressions planted them in America. They fled from your tyranny to a then uncultivated and inhospitable country, where they exposed themselves to almost all the hardships to which human nature is liable; and among others, to the cruelties of a savage foe, the most subtle, and I will take...
Página 41 - The first section of the third article of the constitution declares that "the judicial power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme court, and such inferior courts as congress may, from time to time, ordain and establish.

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