Pindar in English Rhyme: Being an Attempt to Render the Epinikian Odes, with the Principal Remaining Fragments, Into English Rhymed Verse

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H.S. King, 1875 - 313 páginas
 

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Página iii - BARING (TC), MA, MP Pindar in English Rhyme. Being an Attempt to render the Epinikian Odes with the principal remaining Fragments of Pindar into English Rhymed Verse. Small Quarto.
Página 85 - ... in the festival to sing. Zeus' pointed bolt of fire eternal thou in gloom Canst shroud ; the eagle on his sceptre sleeps, And lets his wide Pinions so swift of flight droop down on either side; Of all the feathered kind Though he be lord. About his beaked head a cloud of sable night Thou sheddest ; o'er his orbs of sight Spelled by thy sweep of song his eyelids close In pleasant slumber ; softly to and fro He sways his back in deep repose : Nay, headstrong Ares' self has oftentimes let go His...
Página 90 - For children share the joy by father's won. Then bid our lays For Etna's sovereign friendly flow ; Since Hiero for him Resolved to rear That town in freedom 'neath the laws of Hyllus' rule. For in Aigimius' Doric school The sons of Pamphilus and Herakles — Who 'neath the slopes of wild Taygetus Are settled, dwelling at their ease — Have ever wished to bide. With fortune prosperous They quitted Pindus...
Página 86 - Ares' self has oftentimes let go His lance's cruel point with sleep to glad his mind. To souls of gods thy missiles calm afford, With skill endued By Phoibos and the Muses
Página 87 - Of dark-leafed forest he is chained, and all his back The torments of his bedding rack Laid out at length. O Zeus, I pray thee grant That I may find acceptance in thine eye ; Who lov'st this mountain-top to haunt, A fruitful country's front, whose namesake city nigh Her famous founder has bedecked with glory's sheen ; Since Pytho's herald on the course confessed Her honours thro' The chariot-race's crown adjudged to Hiero.
Página 192 - Fate was sent To turn his heart to jocund merriment ; The other gathered in the hollow glen Of the deep-chested lion, when He bade them shout the name of Thebes, the Thebes he loves, Where rival chariots ran, victorious. Nor does he put to shame Th' hereditary courage of his kin.
Página 89 - Philoktetes' fashion he Has gone to war, and one that held a haughty head Has found it need his flatterer to be. They say of yore The godlike heroes came from Lemnos...
Página 81 - O worshipful Aglaia and Euphrosyne, who love The sounds of song, ye daughters born to Zeus the king Of gods themselves, my invocation hear ; and thou, Thalia, who dost music's blossoms cull, On our procession now Look kindly as it goes To render thanks for good success on tripping toes. In Lydian style Asopichus I came to sing.
Página 85 - When thy sweet strings' melodious quivering The prelude wake, thy signs inspire The hymn that ushers in the festival to sing. Zeus' pointed bolt of fire eternal thou in gloom Canst shroud ; the eagle on his sceptre sleeps, And lets his wide Pinions so swift of flight droop down on either side; Of all the feathered kind Though he be lord.
Página 92 - ... season meet One lift his voice Twisting his many threads to one diminished strand, Less hard will be man's critic-brand Of blame ; for evermore satiety Tarnishes eager hopes : a townsman's ears Do ne'er so much in secrecy Weigh down his soul, as when a friend's success he hears. Yet pass not honours by, for envy is more sweet Than pity.

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