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If the amendment of the Senate is agreed to, that body is notified of the fact by message through the Clerk, and the bill is enrolled.)

In case of disagreement by the House to, or amendment of, the Senate's amendment, see AMENDMENTS BETWEEN THE HOUSES and CONFERENCE COMMITTEES.

After passage by both houses to be enrolled on parchment and examined.-(See Joint Rules 6 and 7, p. 145.)

(See ENROLLED BILLS, COMMITTEE ON.)

After being signed by presiding officers, to be presented to the President.-Joint Rule 9, p. 146.

But not on last day of session.—Joint Rule 17, p. 145.

[This last rule, like the 16th (which see, same page), is usually suspended near the close of the session.]

After a bill is presented to the President, “if he approve he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to that house in which it shall have originated.”—Const., 1, 7, p. 10. [When the President approves a bill, it is the practice for him to notify the bouse where the bill originated of the fact, and the date of his approval, which is entered on the Journal. This message is informally handed in at the clerk's desk, and appears in the Journal of that day's proceedings.]

(See also Rules 157, 158, p. 142.)

In case of a bill returned with the oljectioris of the President, see VETO.

“ If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress, by their adjournment, prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a law.”—Const., 1, 7, p. 10. Where a bill is allowed to become a law by reason of the failure of the President to return the same, it is usual for him to notify the House of that fact, as in the case of approval.—Journals, 2, 36, pp. 424, 480; 2, 39, p. 479. And where he is prevented by an adjournment from returning a bill, it is usual for him to communicate his reasons at the next session for not approving it.-Journals, 3, 12, p. 544; 1, 30, p. 82; 2, 35, p. 151.

Whenever a bill, order, resolution, or vote of the Senate and House of Representatives, having been approved by the President,

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or not having been returned by him with his objections, becomes a law or takes effect, it shall forthwith be received by the Secretary of State from the President; and whenever a bill, order, resolution, or vote is returned by the President with his objections, and, on being reconsidered, is agreed to be passed, and is approved by twothirds of both houses of Congress, and thereby becomes a law or takes effect, it shall be received by the Secretary of State from the President of the Senate or Speaker of the House of Representatives, in whichsoever house it shall last have been so approved, and he shall carefully preserve the originals.-Laws 2d Sess. 43d Congress, p. 294.

"When a bill or resolution which shall have passed in one house is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be given to the house. in which the same shall have passed.”—Joint Rule 12, p. 146. And, when so rejected, "it shall not be brought in during the same session, without a notice of ten days and leave of two-thirds of that house in which it shall be renewed."-Joint Rule 13, p. 146.

In regard to bills left undisposed of at the end of a session, see UNFINISHED BUSINESS.

In regard to the printing of bills, see PRINTING, PUBLIC.

See also R. S. 3786.

BINDING.

Of session documents.-Rule 18, p. 106.

To be done at the Government Printing Office, see R. S., 3785, 3786. The act of December 10, 1877, 1st Session 45th Congress, provides that the Public Printer be authorized to bind at the Government Printing Office any books, maps, charts, or documents published by authority of Congress, upon application of any member of the Senate or House of Representatives, upon payment of the actual cost of such binding.

BLANK BOOKS.

BLANKS.

"In filling up blanks, the largest sum and longest time shall be first put."-Rule 50, p. 113. [But where a specific time or sum stands part of a motion, it is not until it is struck out and a blank thereby produced, that this rule can begin to operate.-Barclay.]

"A bill passed by the one house with blanks. These may be filled up by the other by way of amendments, returned to the first assuch, and passed." -Manual, p. 80.

“In all ballotings blanks shall be rejected, and not taken into the count in enumeration of votes, or reported by the tellers." —Rule 12,

p. 105.

BLUE-BOOK.

(See BIENNIAL REGISTER.)

BOND.

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Of Sergeant-at-Arms.-Rule 26, p. 108.
Of Clerk: Custody of-R. S., Sections 58, 59. .

BOOKS.

Price of, to be deducted from compensation of Member or Delegate.-R. S., Sec. 42.

BRIBERY.

An offer to bribe a member is held to be a breach of the privi. leges of the House.—Journals, 1, 4, p. 389; 1, 15, pp. 117, 154; Manual, p. 55.

Every person who promises, offers, gives, or causes or procures to be promised, offered, or given, any money or other thing of value, or makes or tenders any contract, undertaking, obligation, gratuity, or security for the payment of money, or for the delivery or conveyance of anything of value, to any member of either house of Congress, either before or after such member has been qualified or has taken his seat, with intent to influence his vote or decision on any question, matter, cause, or proceeding which may be at any time pending in either house of Congress, or before any committee thereof, shall be fined not more than three times the amount of money or value of the thing so offered, promised, given, made, or tendered, or caused or procured to be so offered, promised, given, made, or tendered, and shall be, moreover, imprisoned not more than three years.-R. S., Sec. 5450.

Every person who promises, offers, or gives, or causes or procures to be promised, offered or given, any money or other thing of value, or makes or tenders any contract, undertaking, obligation,

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gratuity, or security for the payment of money, or for tbe delivery or conveyance of anything of value, to any officer of the United States, or to any person acting for or on behalf of the United States in any official function, under or by authority of any department or office of the government thereof, or to any officer or person acting for or on behalf of either house of Congress, or of any committee of either house, or both houses thereof, with intent to influence his decision or action on any question, matter, cause, or proceeding which may at any time be pending, or which may by law be brought before him iu his official capacity, or in his place of trust or profit, or with intent to influence him to commit, or aid in committing, or to collude in, or allow any fraud, or make opportunity for the commission of any fraud, on the United States, or to induce him to do or omit to do any act in violation of bis lawful duty, shall be punished as prescribed in the preceding section.-R. S., Sec. 5451.

Any member of either bouse of Congress who asks, accepts, or receives any money, or any promise, contract, undertaking, obligation, gratuity, or security for the payment of money, or for the delivery or conveyance of anything of value, either before or after he has been qualified or has taken his seat as such member, with intent to have his vote or decision on any question, matter, cause, or proceeding which may be at any time pending in either house, or before any committee thereof, influenced thereby, shall be punished by a fine not more than three times the amount asked, accepted, or received, and by imprisoument not more than three years.-R. S., Sec. 5500.

Every officer of the United States, and every person acting for or on behalf of the United States, in any official capacity, under or by virtue of the authority of any department or office of the Government thereof; and every officer or person acting for or on behalf of either house of Congress, or of any committee of either bouse, or of both houses thereof, who asks, accepts, or receives any money, or any contract, promise, undertaking, obligation, gratuity, or security for the payment of money, or for the delivery or conveyance of anything of value, with intent to have his decision or action on any question, matter, cause, or proceeding which may, at any time, be pending, or which may be by law brought before him in his official capacity, or in his place of trust or profit, influenced thereby, shall be punished as prescribed in the preceding section.-R. S., Sec. 5501.

Every member, officer, or person convicted under the provisions of the two preceding sections, who holds any place of profit or trust shall forfeit his office or place, and shall thereafter be forever disqualified from holding any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States.—R. S., Sec. 5502.

BUSINESS, DAILY ORDER OF.

“ The Speaker sball take the chair every day precisely at the hour to which the House shall have adjourned on the preceding day; shall immediately call the members to order; and, on the appearance of a quorum, shall cause the Journal of the preceding day to be read."-Rule 1, p. 103.

66 The consideration of the unfinished business in which the House may be engaged at an adjournment shall be resumed as soon as the Journal of the next day is read, and at the same time each day thereafter until disposed of."-Rule 56, p. 115. But where it is from a committee having a special assignment of a day to report, it must go over to be disposed of on the next day assigned to said committee under the rules.--Journal, 1, 44, p. 860.

“ As soon as the Journal is read, and the unfinished business in which the House was engaged at the last preceding adjournment has been disposed of, reports from committees shall be called for and disposed of; in doing which the Speaker shall call upon each standing committee in regular order, and then upon select committees; and if the Speaker shall not get through the call upon the committees before the House passes to other business, he shall resume the next call where he left off-giving preference to the report last under consideration : Provided, That whenever any committee shall have occupied the morning hour on two days, it shall not be in order for such committee to report further until the other committees shall have been called in their turn.-Rule 51, p. 113. (But this proviso does not prevent the House from occupying the morning hour on more than two days in the consideration of a report previously made.] [In the first session Forty-fourth Congress, House bill No. 3635 occupied seven morning hours.]-(See MORNING HOUR ON MONDAYS.)

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