Genocide and the Politics of Memory: Studying Death to Preserve Life

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 1995 - 240 páginas
More than sixty million people have been victims of genocide in the twentieth century alone, including recent casualties in Bosnia and Rwanda. Herbert Hirsch studies repetitions of large-scale human violence in order to ascertain why people in every histo
 

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Contenido

POLITICS MEMORY AND MASS DEATH
1
Memory and Politics in Bosnia
5
The Politics of Memory
10
History as Memory The Influence of Time and Paradigm
16
The Manipulation of Memory and Political Power
23
STUDYING DEATH
37
CONSTRUCTING MEMORY SURVIVORS AND THEORISTS
39
Primo Levi Recording Memory and Teaching Humanity
43
TRANSMITTING MEMORY WHY PEOPLE KILL
95
The Language of Extermination
97
The Socialization of Memory Teaching Obedience in Nazi Germany
109
Learning to Obey Creating the Conditions for Genocide
123
Memory and Identity Developing Self in the Context of Politics
133
PRESERVING LIFE
157
Where Do We Go from Here? Memory and Resocialization to Preserve Life
161
Memory and the Politics of Preserving Life Preventing Genocide in the PostCold War World
181

Memory and Survival A Reconsideration of the BettelheimDes Pres Debate
56
EXPLAINING MEMORY POSITIVIST AND INTERPRETIVE SOCIAL SCIENCE
71
Trivializing Human Memory Social Science Methods and Genocide Scholarship
73
Robert Jay Lifton Memory and Mass Death
83
Memory Hope and Triumph over Evil
213
References
217
Index
237
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Acerca del autor (1995)

Herbert Hirsch, professor of political science at Virginia Commonwealth University, is author of many books, including Persistent Prejudice: Perspectives on Anti-Semitism and Violence as Politics: A Series of Original Essays.

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