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OF A

MOUTHFUL OF BREAD:

AND ITS EFFECT

ON THE

Organization of Men and Animals.

BY JEAN MACÉ, 1815-1894.

TRANSLATED FROM THE EIGHTH FRENCH EDITION

BY MRS. ALFRED GATTY.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION,
GEPRINTED FROM THE ABOVE, CAREFULLY REVISED AND COMPARED WITH THE SEVEN

TEENTH FRENCH EDITION.

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By JEAN MACÉ.

Translated by MARY L.

HOME FAIRY TALES (Contes du Petit-Château).

Booth. With Engravings. 12mo, Cloth, $1 75.

THE SERVANTS OF THE STOMACH. Reprinted from the London Trans

lation, Revised and Corrected. 12mo, Cloth, $1 75.

THE HISTORY OF A MOUTHFUL OF BREAD: and its Effect on the

Organization of Men and Animals. Translated from the Eighth French
Edition by Mrs. ALFRED GATTY. 12mo, Cloth, $1 75.

THE HISTORY OF THE SENSES AND THOUGHT. Translated by MARY

L. Booth. 12mo. (In Press.)

PUBLISHED BY HARPER & BROTHERS, New YORK.

Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1866,

By J. S. REDFIELD

In the Clerk's office of the District Court of the United States for tho

Southern District of New York.

F38 M14 1866

EXTRACTS FROM THE PREFACE TO THE

ENGLISH EDITION.

THE volume of which the following pages are a translation, nas been adopted by the University Commission at Paris among their prize books, and has reached an eighth edition. Perhaps these facts speak sufficiently in its favor; but as translator, and to some extent editor, I wish to add my testimony to the great charm as well as merit of the little work. I sat down to it, I must own, with no special predilection in favor of the subject as a suitable one for young people; but in the course of the labor have become a thorough convert to the author's views that such a study-perhaps I ought to add, so pursued as he has enabled it to be—is likely to prove a most useful and most desirable one.

The precise age at which the interest of a young mind can be turned towards this practical branch of natural history is an open question, and not worth disputing about. It may vary even in different individuals. The letters are addressed to a child-in the original even to a little girl-and most undoubtedly, as the book stands, it is fit for any child's perusal who can find amusement in its pages: while to the rather older readers, of whom I trust there will be a great many, I will venture to say that the advantage they will gain in the subject having been so treated as to be brought within the comprehension and adapted to the tastes of a child, is pretty nearly incalculable. The quaint. ness and drollery of the illustrations with which difficult scientific facts are set forth will provoke many a smile, no doubt, and in some young people perhaps a tendency to feel themselves treated babyishly; but if in the course of the babyish treatment they find themselves almost unexpectedly becoming masters of an amount of valuable information on very difficult subjects, they will have nothing to complain of. Let such young readers

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