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which was in all ages too often the case, and the fear: of man, which is now the case, and when in that state they come to understand one another, and to act in corps, a more dreadful calamity cannot arise out of hell to scourge mankind. Nothing can be conceived more hard than the heart of a thorough-bred metaphysician. It comes nearer to the cold malignity of a wicked spirit than to the frailty and passion of a man. It is like that of the principle of evil himself, incorporeal, pure, unmixed, dephlegmated, defecated evil.

* * * *

Writers, especially when they act in a body, and with one direction, have great influence on the public mind.

MERCANTILE AND MONIED INTERESTS.

As to the mere matter of estimation of the mercantile or any other class, this is regulated by opinion and prejudice. In England a security against the envy of men in these classes, is not so very complete as we may imagine. We must not impose upon ourselves. What institutions and manners together had done in France, manners alone do here. It is the natural operation of things where there exists a crown, a court, splendid orders of knighthood, and an hereditary nobility;--where there exists a fixed, permanent, landed gentry, continued in greatness and opulence by the law of primogeniture, and by a protection given to family settlements ;--where there exists a standing army and navy; where there exists a church establishment, which bestows on learning and parts an interest combined with that of religion and the state ;-in a country where such things exist, wealth, new in its acquisition and precarious in its duration, can never rank first, or even near the first; though wealth has its natural weight, further, than as it is balanced and even preponderated amongst us as amongst other nations, by artificial institutions and opinions growing out of them.

* * * *

The monied interest is in its nature more ready for any adventure; and its possessors more disposed to new enterprizes of any kind. Being of a recent acquisition, it falls in more naturally with any novelties. It is therefore the kind of wealth which will be resorted to by all who wish for change.

MERCY.

MERCY is not a thing opposed to justice. It is an essential part of it; as necessary in criminal cases, in civil affairs equity is to law.

as

THE END OF THE FIRST VOLUME.

C. WHITTINGHAM, Printer, Dean Street.

INDEX OF REFERENCE

TO THE

WORKS OF THE RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE.

That the reader may be enabled, without trouble, to turn

to the various parts of Mr. BURKE's works, from which
these volumes are selected, the Editor has thought proper
to give an Index of Reference. As the passages in these
volumes are not numbered, the Editor has in the Index
given the initial words of each. The edition referred to
is that of 1803, in eight 8vo. volumes.

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Page
ABJECTNESS. “If we have deserved, &c.” Letters on a
Kegicide Peace. Let. iii. Vol, viii...

303
“ We know that over-labouring, &c.” Letters on a
Regicide Peace. Let, iji. Vol. viii...

304
ABUSE OF POWER IN REMOTE COLONIES." It is dif-

ficult, &c.” Speech on the Nabob of Arcot's debts.
Vol. iv...

317

VOL. I.

Page
ACCURACY OF JUDGMENT." Nothing is such an enemy,

&c.” Thoughts and Details on Scarcity. Vol. vii. 388
ACTS OF GRACE.-" I never relished acts of grace, &c."

Speech at Bristol, previous to the Election. Vol. iii...378
ADVICE.-" If I were to venture, &c.” Letter to a

Member of the National Assembly. Vol. vi..... 52
AFFECTION.-" There is nothing interesting, &c.”

Speech on Economical Reform. Vol. iii...... 282
AMBITION.-" The same sun which gilds, &c.” Obser-

vations on a late State of the Nation. Vol. ii ......... 91
AMERICA—" As long as Europe, &c.” Letters on a

Regicide Peace. Let. iii. Vol. viii.... ..........315
ANALOGIES.--"I am not of opinion, &c.” Letter to W.
Elliot, Esq. Vol. vii...

366
“ In all speculations, &c." Letters on a Regicide
Peace. Let, i. Vol. viii..

79
FESTIVE ANNIVERSARIES.—“The appointment of festive,

&c.” Thoughts on French Affairs. Vol. vii........ 75
APPEALS TO THE POOR.-" The ground of a political, &c."

Observations on the Conduct of the Minority, vol. vii. 262
ARBITRARY POWER—" Arbitrary power is so much, &c

Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs. Vol. vi... 202-3
It is by lying dormant.” Letter to the Sheriffs of
Bristol. Vol. iii..........

151
ARISTOCRACY.-" A true natural aristocracy, &c.”

Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs. Vol. vi.... 217
ATHEISM.-—" We know, and it is our pride, &c.” Re-

flections on the Revolution in France. Vol. v...... 174
• Boldness formerly was not, &c.” Thoughts on
French Affairs. Vol. vii....

58
“ Of all men the most dangerous, &c.” Thoughts on
French Affairs. Vol. vii...

61
• They who have made but, &c.” Letters on a Regicide
Peace. Let. ii. Vol. viii......

237
I call it atheism by establishment, &c.” Letters on
a Regicide Peace. Let. i. Vol. viii...

170
AUTHORITY.-" There is nothing certain, &c.” Speech
on the Nabob of Arcot's debts. Vol. iv.....

198

418

Page
BONDS OF NATIONS." The operation of dangerous, &c."
Letters on Regicide Peace. Let. i. vol. viii..........

180
Books." Nothing ought to be more weighed, &c."

Letter to a Member of the National Assembly.
Vol. vi...........

29
BRIBERY.--" It is by bribing,&c.” Speech on the Nabob
of Arcot's debts. Vol. iv.

315
PROSCRIPTION OF CATHOLICS.-" This way of proscribing

citizens, &c.” Speech at Bristol previous to the

Election. Vol. iii....
“ This way of proscribing men, &c.” Letter to Sir
H. Langrishe. Vol. vi.....

331
" I know well that there is a cant, &c.” Letter to a

Noble Lord on the Pepal Laws. Vol. vi...... 275
“ Bad laws are the worst sort, &c.” Speech at Bristol
previous to the Election. Vol. iii.

390
" The taking away of a vote, &c.” Letter to a noble
Lord, on the Penal Laws. Vol. vi...

279
“ If property be artificially, &c." Letter to Sir H.
Langrishe. Vol. vi....

315
“ The question is not whether, &c.” Remarks on the
Policy of the Allies. Vol. vii......

175
Change.“ We must all obey, &c.” Letter to Sir H.
Langrishe. Vol. vi.........

369
CHARACTERS OF Men." It is in the relaxation, &c.”

Letter to a Member of the National Assembly.
vol. vi...........

26
CHARITY.

.-"Without all doubt charity,” &c. Thoughts
and Details on Scarcity. Vol. vii......

391
It is better to cherish, &c.” Reflections on the Re-
volution in France. Vol. v.

..... 196
CHARTERS.-—" If the bank should, &c.” Speech on Mr.
Fox's East India Bill. Vol. iv....

127
POLITICAL CHEATS.--" Cheats and deceivers never, &c.

Letter to a Member the National Assembly.
Vol. vi...........

10
Church ESTABLISHMENT OF ENGLAND.--" First I beg

leave to speak, &c.” Reflections on the Revolution in
France. Vol. v...

176

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