The End of the Mind: The Edge of the Intelligible in Hardy, Stevens, Larkin, Plath, and Glück

Portada
Psychology Press, 2005 - 276 páginas
This book seeks to include among accounts of modern lyric poetry a theory of the poem's relation to the unintelligible. DeSales Harrison draws a distinction between sites of unintelligibility and sights of difficulty; while much has been said about modernist difficulty, little has been said about the attention that poets give to phenomena thatby definitionarrest, impede, obscure, damage, or destroy the capacity for intelligible representation.
 

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Contenido

Chapter
31
Chapter
67
Chapter Three
103
Chapter Four
143
Chapter Five
173
Conclusion
227
Notes
243
Bibliography
261
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Sylvia Plath
Harold Bloom
Vista de fragmentos - 2007

Acerca del autor (2005)

DeSales Harrison completed his doctoral work at Harvard. In addition to his academic training, he is a candidate at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research in New York. He is presently a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in English at Harvard, where he teaches poetry and poetics. At the moment, he has an article on monumentality in Hardy, Larkin, and Bishop, forthcoming from the journal Variations, which is the journal of literature for the University of Zurich. The article will appear in 2003. He has published reviews in the Boston Book Review (with one forthcoming from the Boston Review ) and poems in the Antioch Review0 , the Iowa Review, and in other small magazines.

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