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UNIVERSITY TOPICS.

PHILOSOPHICAL CLUB.

Mar. 5th, 1889. Kant's Ethical Theory in Relation to His other Thought. Mr. Arthur Fairbanks.

Mar. 19. Bostiöm's Philosophy. Mr. Fritz Jacobson.
April 1st. A Study on Ethical Method. Mr. H. S. Gale.
April 16. Science and Immortality. Prof. A. Jay DuBois.

THE SEMITIC CLUB.

March 6th, a paper was read by Mr. Charles H. Wissner on the second Assyrian period. The paper gave a condensed history of the reigns of Tiglath Pileser II., Sargon, Sennacherib, Esarhaddoa, Ašurbanipal. Special attention was given to the decline of the Empire under Ašurbanipal, and its fall under his successor.

March 20th, Synopses of recent articles on Semitic subjects were read by different members of the club.

April 3d, Mr. Frank K. Sanders read a paper on the Second Period of Babylonian Supremacy. The paper touched upon the sources of the history, the sudden rise of the Empire under Nebuchadnezzar, his wars and public works, his character and place in history, emphasizing his relations with Judea and Egypt. The weakening of the real strength of the Empire under his successors and its fall under the royal antiquarian Nabonidus, when Cyrus at last became able to reach the gates of Babylon.

YALE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN.

No. 84.-WEEK ENDING APRIL 6, 1889. Sunday, March 31.-Public WorshipBattell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. William R. Richards, of Plainfield, N. J. General Religious MeetingDwight Hall, 6.30 P. M. Address by the Rev. Mr. Richards.

Monday, April 1.-Philosophical Club-A Study in Ethical Method, by Mr. Harlow Gale. Room D, East Divinity Hall, 8 P. M. University Reception-Dwight Hall, 8–11 P. M.

Tuesday, April 2.The Antiquity of Man (Lecture in the Sheffield Scientific School Course)—Professor Verrill. North Sheffield Hall, 8 P. M.

Wednesday, April 3.- Metaphysics (University Lecture)- Professor Ladd. 194 Old Chapel, 4 P. M. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture) - Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M. Semitic Club-Historical Paper by Mr. F. K. Sanders, on the Babylonian Period. 135 College st., 7 P. M. University Chamber Concert-Beethoven Quartette. North Sheffield Hall, 8.15 P. M.

Friday, April 5.--History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)-Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 4 P. M. Berkeley Association (Evening Prayer)–Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M. Lecture Preparatory to Communion Service-Dwight Hall, 7.30 P. M. The Laborer and his Employer (Lecture in the Sheffield Scientific School Course)-President Francis A. Walker, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. North Sheffield Hall, 8 P. M.

University Chamber Concerts—The Sixth and Final Concert of the Series will be given by the Beethoven Quartette on Wednesday evening, April 3, with the following programme : 1. Mozart.- Quartette, C major (17, Peters). 2. Beethoven.-From Serenade Op. 8, for Violin, Viola and Cello. 3. Schubert.-Op. posth., D minor.

No 85.-WEEK ENDING APRIL 13, 1889. Sunday, April 7.-Public Worship, followed by Communion ServiceBattell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. President Dwight. General Religious Meeting-Dwight Hall, 6.30 P. M. Addresses by Students.

Tuesday, April 9.-The Brain (University Lecture)—Professor Williston. Room 11, Medical College, 4 P. M. Mathematical Club-Mr. E. H. Moore, concerning Six, especially six points in a space of four dimensions. Sloane Laboratory, 7.30 P. M. Classical and Philological Society -Professor Goodell, on Recent Excavations at Mycenae. Room D, East Divity Hall, 8 P. M.

Wednesday, April 10.—Metaphysics (University Lecture)—Professor Ladd. 194 Old Chapel, 4 P. M. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)—Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M.

Thursday, April 11.—College Junior Exhibition-Battell Chapel, 3 P. M.

Friday, April 12.-History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)-Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 4 P. M. The Brain

(University Lecture)—Professor Williston. Room 11, Medical College, 4 P. M. Berkeley Association (Evening Prayer)-- Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M. Political Science Club-Paper by Mr. D. E. Leary, on Factory Legislation. 195 Old Chapel, 7.30 P. M.

Junior FxhibitionYale College.—The Junior Exhibition will be held in the Battell Chapel on Thursday, April 11, at 3 P. M. The following is the order of speakers, with their subjects : 1. Roger S. Baldwin, on Cardinal Lavigerie. 2. Yale Kneeland, on Henry Ward Beecher in England in 1863. 3. John Crosby, on John Wilmot, 2d Earl of Rochester. 4. John D. Jackson, on Voltaire's Influence on Liberalism in France. 5. Lewis S. Haslam, on Julian the Apostate. 6. George A. Hurd, on the Provençal Element in Daudet. 7. Walter A. DeCamp, on Walt Whitman. 8. Wolcott W. Ellsworth, on some Conceptions of Job's Author.

The Henry James TenEyck Prizes, the income of a fund of twenty-six hundred dollars, established in 1888 by the Kingsley Trust Association in memory of Henry James TenEyck (Yale College, 1879), will be awarded by the Faculty to the successful competitors.

No. 86.-Two WEEKS ENDING APRIL 27, 1889. Sunday, April 14.Public Worship-Battell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. Professor Harris. General Religious Meeting-Dwight Hall, 6.30 P. M. Address by Professor Harris.

Tuesday, April 16.The Brain (University Lecture)—Professor Williston. Room 11, Medical College, 4 P. M. Philosophical Club-Paper, by Professor DuBois, on Science and Immortality. Room D, East Divinity Hall, 8 P. M.

Wednesday, April 17.-Spring Recess (College and Sheffield Scientific School) begins, 9.30 A. M. Sophomore Compositions due at 9.30 A. M. at No. 153 Farnam Hall. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)-Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M.

Wednesday, April 24.-Spring Recess (College and Scientific School) ends.

Friday, April 26.History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)-Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 4 P. M. The Brain (University Lecture)—Professor Williston. Room 11, Medical College, 4 P. M. Berkeley Association (Evening Prayer)--Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M.

Junior Compositions-Yale College.—The last Junior Compositions for the year will be due at No. 2 Treasury Building on June 1. The following subjects are prescribed. Any persons wishing to write on other subjects must obtain permission to do so before May 10. 1. Should the diplomatic service of the United States be changed with each administration?' 2. Étienne Dolet (as a representative of Renaissance Humanism). 3. Effects of the present system of representation in the Lower House of the Connecticut Legislature. 4. Hogarth as a teacher of morals. 5. The relation of Christian missionaries to civilization. 6. Yale in the Civil War. 7. Shakspere's personality, as expressed in his Sonnets. 8. Studies of Elizabethan middle-class life in the plays of Dekker and Mid

dleton. 9. A sketch of the old conflicts between students and the New Haven populace. 19. The influence of the Sunday newspaper. 11. Parnell's Irish leadership, as affected by the events of the last year. 12. Is it desirable that Yale's intercollegiate athletics should be restricted to a league with Harvard?

Spring Recess.-During the Recess (April 17-24), the University Library will be open during the morning hours only, from 9.30 to 1; the Linonian and Brothers Library from 10 to 12 on Wednesday and Saturday. The Treasury will be open from 10 to 1.

P. M.

No. 87.-WEEK ENDING MAY 4, 1888. Sunday, April 28.- Public Worship-Battell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. William M. Taylor, D.D., of New York City. General Religious Meeting -Dwight Hall, 6.30 P. M. Address by the Rev. Dr. Taylor.

Wednesday, May 1.-Last Day for handing in John A. Porter Prize Essays, 105 Grove st. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)- Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M.

Thursday, May 2.-College Faculty Meeting, 7 Treasury Building, 4 P. M.

Friday, May 3.-History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)-Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 4 P. M. The Brain (University Lecture)- Professor Williston. Room 11, Medical College, 4

Berkeley Association (Evening Prayer)—Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M Lecture Preparatory to Communion Service. Dwight Hall, 7.30 P. M. Political Science ClubPaper by Mr. K. Matsugata, on the Constitution of Japan. 195 Old Chapel, 7.30 P. M.

Berkeley Scholarship, Yale College.—The annual examination for the Berkeley Scholarship, yielding about $55.00 a year to a resident graduate for the three years after graduation, will take place on Monday, May 6. Any members of the senior class who propose to enter the examination must present their names to Mr. Dexter on or before Thursday, May 2.

Graduate Fellowships and Scholarships. - Members of the Senior Class in College, or recent graduates in Arts, who wish to be considered as candidates for any Graduate Fellowships or Scholarships which may fall vacant at Commencement, 1889, are requested to communicate with Mr. Dexter before May 15.

Commencement Pieces-Yale College.—Commencement pieces should be handed to Professor Beers on or before Monday, May 27. All members of the Senior Class with a Dissertation appointment, or upwards, are entitled to compete. Special-honor theses, if suitable in subject and form, may be used for Commencement. The pieces should not exceed twelve minutes in speaking. The date for handing in Theses for Special Honors is postponed to June 1.

Bristed Scholarship, Yale College. - An examination for this Scholarship, which yields over one hundred dollars a year and is tenable until the end of the third year after graduation, will be held on Monday, May 6. Juniors or Sophomores who desire to compete are requested to report their names to Mr. Dexter, at the Library, on or before Thursday, May 2. CURRENT

LITERATURE.

WHITTIER'S PROSE WORKS,* here collected and published in three handsome duodecimo volumes, have unmistakably the same flavor which has made his verses to be so prized. There is in both the same devotion to Right and Duty, the same sincerity, the same simplicity and clearness of expression. No reader can fail to recognize the author's moral earnestness, whatever may be the subject on which, or whatever the form of language in which, he expresses his views.

But we are inclined to think that what will give lasting value to these “prose works" is that which Mr. Whittier has contributed to the illustration of our early New England history, and especially to the illustration of the spirit which animated our fathers. We cannot but think, also, that in his own life the poet has shown, to a generation that is inclined to criticise unsparingly what it calls the austerity of the Puritans, that one who has ever set before himself ideals as high as any of theirs, and has denounced evil in every guise with a spirit no less uncompromising than theirs, has yet been able in his daily life to manifest a kindliness and a geniality of manner which have called out the love of all. We quote what Mr. Whittier says about the Puritan spirit.

“Our age is tolerant of creed and dogma, broader in its sympathies, more keenly sensitive to temporal need, and, practically recognizing the brotherhood of the race, wherever a cry of suffering is heard its response is quick and generous. . . . All the more, however, for this amiable tenderness do we need the counterpoise of a strong sense of justice. With our sympathy for the wrong-doer we need the old Puritan and Quaker hatred of wrong-doing; with our just tolerance of men and opinions a righteous abhorrence of sin. All the more for the sweet humanities and Christian liberalism which, in drawing men nearer to each other, are increasing the sum of social influences for good

* Whittier's Prose Works. 3 vols. 12mo. pp. 436, 437, 402. Houghton, Miffin & Co. Boston, 1889.

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