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ACID PHOSPHATE.

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. HORSFORD.

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED FOR

Dyspepsia, Nervousness, Exhaustion,

Headache, Tired Brain,
And all Diseases arising from Indigestion and Nerve Exhaustion.

This is not a compounded "patent medicine," but a preparation of phosphates and phosphoric acid in the form required by the system.

It aids digestion without injury, and is a beneficial food and tonic for the brain and nerves.

It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only, and agrees with such stimulants as are necessary to take.

Dr. E. W. HILL, Glens Falls, N. Y., says: “An excellent remedy for atonic dyspepsia, nervous and general debility, or any low state of the system."

Dr. D. A. STEWART, Winona, Minn., says: “Entire satisfaction in cases of perverted digestion, loss of nerve-power, malnutrition and kindred ailments."

Dr. G. H. LEACH, Cairo, Ill., says: “Of great power in dyspepsia, and nervous prostration.” Descriptive pamphlet free.

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I.

Beware of Substitutes and Imitations.
Be sure the word “ Horsford's ” is printed on the label. All others

are spurious. Never sold in bulk.

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NEW ENGLANDER

AND

YALE REVIEW.

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI.

APRIL, 1889.

ART. I. Bryce on American Legislation. Simeon E. Baldwin, New Haven. II. High Church Congregationalism.

Charles C. Starbuck, Andover, Mass. III. Conway's “Edmund Randolph."

Daniel H. Chamberlain, New York City. IV. The Lost Cause.

Burdett Hart, New Haven.

UNIVERSITY TOPICS.
Classical and Philosophical Society of Yale College.
Philosophical Club.
Yale University Bulletin.

CURRENT LITERATURE. The Poems of Emma Lazarus.—The Human Mystery in Hamlet. By Martin W. Cooke.-The American Book of Church Services. By Edward Hungerford.-An Introductory New Testament Greek Method. By W. R. Harper, Ph.D., and R. F. Weidner, D.D.--Elements of Hebrew Syntax. By W. R. Harper, Ph.D.

NEW HAVEN:
WILLIAM L. KINGSLEY, PROPRIETOR.

Tuttle, Morehouse and Taylor, Printers, 871 State Street.

First and Fundamental Truths.
BEING A TREATISE ON METAPHYSICS. By JAMES MCCOSA, D.D., LL.D. 12mo,

$2.00. Dr. McCosh believes that the associated mental exercises have now been so far examined and ascertained that it is possible to discover and express the nature of the fundamental laws on which they stand. To do this is the purpose of this work.

“This is a treatise on metaphysics, in which the learned author explains systematically and thoroughly, and in a manner that can be easily comprehended by the ordinary reader, the fundamental laws governing the associated mental exercises. He regards this work as the copestone of what he was competent to accomplish in philosophy, and it is certainly a volume that is worthy of careful study. It should have an extensive circulation among thoughtful people everywhere." – Boston Saturday Gazette. The History of the Roman Republic. ABRIDGED FROM THE HISTORY BY PROF. MOMMSEN. By C. BRYANS and F.J. R.

HENDY. 12mo, $1.75. This abridgment of Prof. Theodor Mommsen's popular “History of the Roman Republic" presents the salient points of the original in an attractive and condensed form.

"He breathes a new life into the dry bones of Roman history, and makes us see in it the work of those living forces which, combined in a slightly different manner, are now shaping our own development."- London Literary World.

"The work is stamped with the weight of solid work."-New York Commercial Advertiser.

"The abridgment has been most successfully performed."-Boston Beacon. Dogmatic Theology. By WILLIAM G. T. SHEDD, D.D., Roosevelt Professor of Systematic Theology in

Union Theological Seminary. 2 vols., 8vo, $7.00. “No intellectual pursuit in the whole history of this country has had the benefit of so well-reasoned and well fortified a presentation as has our American Cal. vanism in Dr. Shedd's volumes."- Boston Beacon.

“One of the few great books of the past year. It is scholarly, profound, devout, thorough."--The Examiner.

An intellectual achievement of the first order. It holds an almost unique, not to say solitary, position in the entire history of this country."-Boston Beacon.

"The work is the clearest and most exhaustive statement of 'dogmatic theology' that has yet been made."-Philadelphia Times.

"Pervaded by the great thoughts of the master minds of all the ages."-New York Observer.

A NEW VOLUME IN THE EPOCH SERIES. The English Restoration and Louis XIV. FROM THE PEACE OF WESTPHALIA TO THE PEACE OF NIMWEGEN. By OSMUND

AIRY. With 3 Maps. 16mo, $1.00. In a clear, concise and graphic style the author has given a remarkably interesting account of this important period of modern history.

"Admirable arrangement, complete mastery of his subject, a power to be vivid as well as brief, a style at once clear and easy-these are some of the excellencies that mark this work."-Boston Advertiser.

At once concise and adequate."-New York Sun.
A really solid and valuable book."-London Literary World.

For literary finish and brilliancy, it leaves little to be desired."-Boston Traveller,
An Introductory New Testament, Greek Method.
By Professor WILLIAM R. HARPER, Ph.D., Yale University, and Professor R. F.

WEIDNER, D.D., Augustana Theological Seminary. 12mo. Price, $2.50 net. Many who have not studied Classical Greek desire to know New Testament

Greek. For these as well as for those who, having studied Classical Greek, desire to review more particularly the principles of Now Testament Greek,

this book is intended. ** For sale by booksellers, or sent, postpaid, upon, receipt of price by the publishers,

CHAS. SCRIBNER'S SONS, 743 & 746 Broadway, N. Y.

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The American Commonwealth. By JAMES BRYCE, Author

of the “Holy Roman Empire,” M. P. for Aberdeen. In two volumes. London: MacMillan & Co., and New York. 1888. 8vo, pp. xx. 750, 743.

PROFESSOR BRYCE has brought to this work on the American Commonwealth two things not often united in a critic of our institutions, an extensive and exact acquaintance with history, and that familiarity with practical politics which comes only from actual contact with it, in important official positions. He is a close observer, but does not weary the reader with too much particularity of detail. It is a fault of Englishmen, he owns, in book-making to try to cover the whole ground with equal minuteness, and it is a fault from which he has kept himself free. And, on the other hand, this self-distrust which withheld him from giving careful attention to many matters

17

VOL. XIV.

which are really intelligible only to Americans, has limited the generalizations which he draws to comparatively narrow bounds. It is not however because he had formed few.

“ When I first visited America,” he says, “eighteen years ago, I brought home a swarm of bold generalizations. Half of them were thrown overboard after a second visit in 1881. Of the half that remained some were dropped into the Atlantic when I returned across it after a third visit in 1883–84; and although the two latter journeys gave birth to some new views, these views are fewer and more discreetly cautious than their departed sisters of 1870."

One of the earliest which he puts forward is that parties have been organized far more elaborately in the United States than anywhere else in the world, and have passed more completely under the control of a professional class.”

It may be doubted whether this is true except as to national politics, and the government of our great cities. The rule of the political “ boss” is generally felt in inverse proportion to the territory he seeks to cover, but as regards our Presidential elections, it must be owned that the machinery by which they are evolved is supplied less by law than by party usage. The device of the electoral college, which the framers of our Constitution fondly imagined would frustrate every attempt to subordinate the will of the individual elector to that of any aggregation of individuals, has proved inadequate to cope with the power of the caucus and the press, the railroad and the telegraph.

This, however, was almost the only thing in which they failed to forecast the development of their work with some degree of precision. After all deductions, says Mr. Bryce, the Constitution of the United States ranks above every other known to history "for the intrinsic excellence of its scheme, its adaptation to the circumstances of the people, the simplicity, brevity, and precision of its language, its judicious mixture of definiteness in principle with elasticity in details.” No small part of its merits he ascribes to its accepting as its model in general the Constitutions already adopted and in use in the several States. So far as it followed them it had a settled experience to rely on, but “nearly every provision that has

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