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been hitherto so thoroughly and fairly discussed, and that it can not be learned so well from

any

other source. Dr. Drummond's book is a most valuable addition to the literature of the subject, but the needs of the student of Philo are still numerous and pressing. There is need of a new edition of his works, and of critical introductions to the several books. There is need, as Schürer has recently stated, of an adequate treatment of the Judaism of Philo. This would be a most welcome contribution toward the solving of a more general problem, of the greatest importance, on which we have reached as yet far less clearness and security than is sometimes supposed,—the problem of the thoughts and beliefs of the Jews in the time of Christ.

F. C. PORTER.

UNIVERSITY TOPICS.

THE SEMITIC CLUB.

The Semitic Club of the University has about forty members. Its meetings are on the second and fourth Wednesday evenings of each month.

Wednesday evening, Jan. 23d, a paper was read by Mr. Charles H. Wissner on the first Assyrian period. The paper treated of the origin, character, and religious habits of the Assyrians. The period was separated into three divisions. (1.) The relation between Assyria and Babylon, until the conquest of Babylon by Tiglath Adar I. The power of Babylon during this period was emphasized. (2.) From Adarpalekur to the son of Tiglathpileser I. A detailed account was given of Tiglathpileser, the most important of the kings. (3.) From Shamshiramman II. to Asburnirari. The most important events in the lives of Ashurnasirpal and Shalmeneser II., the two most prominent kings of this period, were given.

YALE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN.

P. M.

No. 72.-FOUR WEEKS ENDING JANUARY 12, 1889. Sunday, December 16.--Public Worship-Battell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. President Dwight. General Religious Meeting-Dwight Hall, 6.30

To be conducted and addressed by students. Tuesday, December 18.Philosophical ClubPaper by Mr. B. M. Wright, on Pessimism. Room D, East Divinity Hall, 8 P. M.

Wednesday, December 19.First College Term Ends, 6 P. M.

Thursday, December 20.-College Faculty Meeting7 Treasury Building, 10 A. M.

Tuesday, January 8.--Second College Term begins, 8.10 A. M.

Wednesday, January 9.-Metaphysics (University Lecture)--Professor Ladd. 194 Old Chapel, 4 P. M. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)-Professor Harper, Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M.

Thursday, January 10.The Young Preacher's Outfit (Lecture in the Divinity School)-Rev. Professor John A. Broadus, D.D., of Louisville, Ky. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M.

M.

Friday January 11.-Freshness in Preaching (Lecture in the Divinity School)-Rev. Dr. Broadus. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M. Berkeley A880ciation (Evening Prayer)-Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M. Political Science Club-Paper on the Reconstruction of Western Virginia, Missouri, and Tennessee, by Mr. Frederick W. Moore. 195 Old Chapel, 7.30 P. M.

No. 73.-WEEK ENDING JANUARY 19, 1889. Sunday, January 13.-Public Worship-Battell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. Professor John A. Broadus, D.D., of Louisville, Ky. General Religious Meeting-Dwight Hall, 6.30 P. M. To be addressed by Professor Reynolds.

Tuesday January 15.-The Spanish School of Painting (Lecture in the Art School)-Professor Hoppin. Art School, 3 P. Sensation Preaching (Lecture in the Divinity School)--Rev. Dr. Broadus. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M. German Readings (Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea)-Mr. Goodrich. Room C, Cabinet, 7.15 P. M. University Chamber Concert-North Sheffield Hall, 8.15 P. M.

Wednesday, January 16.—Evolution-Professor J. D. Dana. Peabody Museum Lecture Room, 2 P. M. Metaphysics (University Lecture) – Professor Ladd. 194 Old Chapel, 4 P. M. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture) - Professor Harper, Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M. Yale Assembly-Discussion on the Propriety of the General Government's recognizing the Organization of Labor. Linonia Hall, 7.30 P. M.

Thursday, January 17.-Freedom in Preaching (Lecture in the Divinity School)-Rev. Dr. Broadus. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M.

Friday, January 18.-The Minister's General Reading (Lecture in the Divinity School)-Rev. Dr. Broadus. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M. College Faculty Meeting7 Treasury Building, 4 P. M. Berkeley Association (Evening Prayer)—Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M.

Lectures at the School of the Fine Arts.-Professor Hoppin will give during the present term a course of ten Lectures, at the Art School, beginning on Tuesday, January 15, at 3 P. M., and continuing on successive Tuesdays at the same hour.

University Chamber Concerts.—The second concert of the series will be given on Tuesday evening, January 15, by Messers. Dannreuther, Hartdegen and Richard Hoffman, with the following programme : Beethoven,-Trio, Op. 70, in D Major. Greig,-Sonata Op. 8, in F Major, for Pianoforte and Violin. Schumann,-Novelette, Wagner,Spinning Song, Piano Solo. Schubert,—Trio, Op. 99, in B Flat. Tickets to the remaining five (possibly six) Concerts, at $2.00 for the series, can be obtained at the Treasurer's Office at the Co-operative Store, at Beers’ Drug Store, and from the Janitor of North Sheffield Hall.

Lectures on Evolution.— Yale College.-Professor J. D. Dana will give a course of nine Lectures on Evolution to the Senior Class, in the Lecture Room of the Peabody Museum, begining on Wednesday, January 16, at 2 P. M., and continuing on successive Wednesdays at the same hour.

Subjects for Sophomore Compositions.Yale College.-1. Anna Karenina. (Tolstóï.) 2. Matthew Arnold as a Critic. 3. Burke's Attitude towards the French Revolution. 4. Richard Steele. 5. New Haven Architecture. 6. Pres ential Candid since 1840. 7. Ballot Reform. 8. Trusts. 9. The Annexation of Canada. 10. The forms of Local Government in your own State. (Describe and discuss them.) 11. General Boulanger. The compositions will be due at No. 4 Treasury building on Saturday morning, February 9th.

No. 74.-WEEK ENDING JANUARY 26, 1889. Sunday, January 20.—Public Worship-Battell Chapel, 10.30 A. M. Rev. George A. Gordon, of Boston, Mass. General Religious Meeting, Dwight Hall, 6.30 P. M. To be addressed by the Rev. Mr. Gordon.

Tuesday, January 22.- Last Day for payment of College Term BillsTreasurer's Office, 9 A, M.-3 P. M. The Spanish School of Painting (Lecture in the Art School)—Professor Hoppin. Art School 3 P. M. Greek Readings (Eighteenth Book of the Iliad)—Professor Seymour. 195 Old Chapel, 7-7.45 P. M. German Readings (Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea) -Mr. Goodrich. Room C, Cabinet, 7.15 P. M. Philosophical ClubPaper by Mr. J. F. Morse, on The Psychology of the Spiritual Life. Room D, East Divinity Hall, 8 P. M.

Wednesday, January 23.- Evolution-Professor J. D. Dana. Peabody Museum Lecture Room, 2 P. M. Metaphysics (University Lecture) Professor Ladd. 194 Old Chapel, 4 P. M. History of Old Testament Prophecy (University Lecture)—Professor Harper. Room B, Cabinet, 5 P. M. Semitic Club-Historical Paper by Mr. Charles H. Wissner, on The First Assyrian Period. Professor Harper's Residence, 135 College st., 7 P. M.

Thursday, January 24.The Minister's General Reading (Lecture in the Divinity School)—Rev. Dr. Broadus. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M.

Friday, January 25.The Minister and his Hymn-book (Lecture in the Divinity School)-Rev. Dr. Broadus. Marquand Chapel, 3 P. M. Berkeley Association (Evening Prayer)–Room 89, Dwight Hall, 6.45 P. M.

Greek Readings.-Professor Seymour will translate the last books of Homer's Iliad, with brief comments, on successive Tuesday evenings at Room No. 195, Old Chapel.

CURRENT LITERATURE.

REALISTIC IDEALISM.*-In his Introduction the author of these volumes takes pains to state clearly what kind of a philosophical system he has exposed and proposes to expound and defend. After a brief historical survey of the shifting phases and Protean shapes which the long and varied contest (i. e. of philosophy as to the true explanation of reality) has assumed, he sums up all in the following four Theories of the Universe: (1.) The BiblicalSupernatural Theory; (2.) The Materialistic-Machine Theory; (3.) The Mystical-Idealistic Theory; and (4.) The Realistic. Ideal Theory. The first of these four is said to be founded on the myths and miracles of the Bible, whereby philosophy is taken to be a science of matter and therefore becomes impossible and impertinent. The theory called “Realistic-Ideal” is the author's own, and is defined as holding that “the Real and the Ideal are not two distinct worlds, but only the two sides or aspects of one and the same whole Actuality of real Essence and Power. The method of this philosophy is the “universal method of the Metaphysical Logic which takes up all science into intelligible and clear solntion.” The first volume traces the proofs of this philosophical theory in the systems of notable thinkers, especially of Hegel; and the second volume attempts the same thing in the world of nature and mind.

The book has evidently been undertaken with commendable seriousness by its author, and shows unmistakable signs of being the result of much painstaking reflection and wide reading. It shows, however, equally clear signs of dealing with many questions which have never been thought through, or even made familiar in the way in which they become so to the trained philosopher; and as well as of taking not a few of its quoted opinions at second hand, with a misunderstanding of the real views of the authors quoted. We are again reminded of how difficult a task

2 vols.

* Realistic Idealism in Philosophy Itself. By NATHANIEL HOLMES. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1888.

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