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Peep into a Welsh Iron Valley, a

316

“ People Trampled Down, the:" with a Prophecy

201

Philosophy of Facts, the

242

Pilgrim, the. By Mrs. Acton Tindall

140

Place of the Fine Arts in the Natural System of Society, the

72

Pound and Penny Bribery. By Paul Bell

204

Prince and the Philibeg, the. By Paul Bell

537

Reviews of New Books :

Bachelor of the Albany, the. By the Author of “ The Falcon Family" 470

Friends in Council. A Series of Readings and Discourse thereon.-

Book the First .

280

Grantley Manor. A Tale. By Lady Georgiana Fullerton .

189

Guide to the Birth-Town of Shakspeare, and the Poet's Rural Haunts, a.

By George May

287

History of the Conquest of Peru, with a Preliminary View of the
Civilisation of the Incas. By W. H. Prescott .

92

History of Servia, a ; and the Servian Revolution, from Original MSS.

and Documents. Translated from the German of Leopold Ranke.

By Mrs. Alexander Kerr

332

Jane Eyre. . An Autobiography. Edited by Currer Bell

470

Life of Percy Bysshe Shelley, the. By Thomas Medwin .

474

Mauprat. By George Sand. Translated by Matilda M. Hayes.
Forming Parts V. and VI. of the Works of Sand .

376
Men, Women, and Books. A Selection of Sketches, Essays, and Critical
Memoirs from his uncollected Writings. By Leigh Hunt

88

Mind and Matter. Illustrated by Considerations on Hereditary

Insanity, and the Influence of Temperament in the Development of

the Passions. By J. G. Millingen, M.D., &c.

478

Plea to Power and Parliament, for the Working Classes, a. By R. A.

Slaney

96

Protector, the. A Vindication. By J. H. Merle D'Aubigne, D.D. 185

Protégé, the. By Mrs. Ponsonby

189

Russell. By G. P. R. James

139

Sequential Singing Manual, the. Vocal Exercises on the Sequential

System

91

Shakspeare Society's Papers, the, Vol. III. By the Shakspeare Society 476
Sto and Studies, from the Chr cles and History of England. By
Mrs. S, C. Hall, and Mrs. J. Foster

284
Warning to Wives, a. By the Author of “ Cousin Geoffry

470
Season out of Season, the. By Paul Bell

45

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Sermon on Universal Charity, a: and What was the Fruit it bore. By G.
De Lys

158 Something about Dimples. Their Use and Origin

516 Somethings about Something or another. By William Thom

514 Testimonials and Tests. By Paul Bell

362 “ The Works" of John Ironshaft. By Silverpen

453 Thoughts on Visiting Highgate Cemetery

535 Three Sonnets to a Child. By Thomas Wade

117 To a Locket. By W. C. Bennett

421 Tree of Liberty, the. By Goodwyn Barmby .

326 Twin Brother, the. By Mrs. Acton Tindall

340 Voice from the Crowd in a Steamboat, a. By Angus B. Reach.

55 What is the Cause of Surprise ? and what Connection has it with the Laws of Suggestion ? By Henry Mayhew

547 Widow-Mother to her Infant, the. By Mrs. Acton Tindall

405 Wisdom of “ Another Place," the .

256 Word to all Anti-Jesuits, a

436 Word or two on Changes, a

275 Word or two on Genius, a

224 Young Men of our Times, the. The Usher. By J. Gostick

176 Young Watson; or, the Riots of 1816. By H. Holl 59 119, 229, 323

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DOUGLAS JERROLD'S

SHILLING MAGAZINE.

THE DREAMER AND THE WORKER.*

BY THE AUTHOR OF "ORION.”

CHAPTER XIII. MR. WALTON IS UNEXPECTEDLY EDIFIED BY AN IRISH FARMER ON THE SUB

JECT OF GRASS.—MARY AND THE MISS LLOYDS.-MECHANICS' INSTITUTE. -LECTURE ON MESMERISM, WITH THE EFFECTS PRODUCED. “ COME in!” said Mr. Walton, as he sat alone one morning, and was disturbed from a meditation by a tap at the door. Nobody entered. “ Come in!” repeated he, raising his voice.

The tapping was repeated. “Come in, I say !"

The door still remained closed. Nobody entered. Under the impression that he must have only fancied it, and that nobody had really tapped at the door, Mr. Walton was about to revert to his previous train of thought, when again there came a gentle tap or two at the door. “Ahem!” coughed Mr. Walton to clear his throat.

6. Come in!”_shouted he—“confound you!”

The door opened a little way, and the head of a tall man, with short black hair, black eyes, and a face with Spanish features, but a mild expression of humility bordering upon grave humour, cautiously peeped into the room.

Well, sir?” said Mr. Walton, after waiting a sufficient time, “why don't you come in ? "Maybe I was only waiting while yer honner tould me to do

* Continued from page 507, Vol. V. No. XXXI.-VOL. VI.

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that,” replied the man in a deprecatory voice, with an Irish accent, and a musical, rising inflection.

· WellI tell you now to do so. Do come in at once ; don't stand peeping at me in that manner.

The man came in, apparently very much on his guard not to give offence, or commit any impropriety. He closed the door softly behind him.

“ Now, sir,” said Mr. Walton, “what do you want with

me?

66

“I'm not after wanting anything of yer honner,” said the man calmly, and smiling into the crown of his hat.

“What is your business then ? ”

“It's various," replied the man, advancing a pace or two. “But me own more spishal business is the sowing of grasses, and the general managemint of grass lands."

• How—what is this?” Mr. Walton thought he had not heard correctly. He also began to feel some trepidation.

“Och its done afthur various systums--and it's an illigant thing when it 's well done.

Mr. Walton now felt convinced that this strange visitor must be some insane man ; so he thought it best to humour him.

“ And how do you do it ? said he, forcing a smile.

“The sowing, or the tratemint ? ” inquired the man, mildly, but advancing a pace nearer, with brightening eyes.

“Oh, whichever you like-say, the sowing.'

“I should give four or five bushels of mixed grass to the statute acre, with yer

honner's lave; and if the loam was nately prepared I should select two measures of meadow foxtail, the same of meadow fescue, hard fescue, and of rough-stalked meadow-grass --though it's the divvel-and-all dear—and two of cock's-foot grass, likewise. Half a measure (here the man lifted up one finger at Mr. Walton, with a grave, warning air) half a measure of tall yellow oat-grass; rather more—though Patrick Low says less of the meadow cat’s-tail; and more still of rye-grass, and the crested dog's-tail."

“Excellent !” said Mr. Walton, turning pale and looking anxiously towards the door.

“Nevertheless, ye 'll plaise to obsarve," pursued the man, shaking his head slowly, that the dog's-tail is the most ixpinsive of all the grasses— barrin' the sheep's fescue. Och, whin the swate dew's upon the uplands, and sparkles upon the woolly coats

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