Life and Letters of Dr. William Beaumont: Including Hitherto Unpublished Data Concerning the Case of Alexis St. Martin

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C.V. Mosby Company, 1912 - 317 páginas
 

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Página 78 - My intention being to acquire the habitude of all these virtues, I judged it would be well not to distract my attention by attempting the whole at once but to fix it on one of them at a time, and when I should be master of that, then to proceed to another, and so on till I should have gone through the thirteen.
Página 77 - It was about this time I conceived the bold and arduous project of arriving at moral perfection. I wished to live without committing any fault at any time, and to conquer all that either natural inclination, custom or company, might lead me into. As I knew, or thought I knew, what was right and wrong, I did not see why I might not always do the one and avoid the other.
Página 79 - I crossed these columns with thirteen red lines, marking the beginning of each line with the first letter of one of the virtues; on which line, and in its proper column, I might mark by a little black spot, every fault I found upon examination to have been committed respecting that virtue, upon that day I determined to give a week's strict attention to each of the virtues successively.
Página 78 - I had undertaken a task of more difficulty than I had imagined. While my care was employed in guarding against one fault, I was often surprised by another; habit took the advantage of inattention; inclination was sometimes too strong for reason. I concluded, at length, that the mere speculative conviction that it was our interest to be completely virtuous was not sufficient to prevent our slipping; and that the contrary habits must be broken, and good ones acquired and established, before we can...
Página 78 - Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. 2 SILENCE Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. 3 ORDER Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time.
Página xiii - Indeed I cannot conceive a more perfect mode of writing any man's life, than not only relating all the most important events of it in their order, but interweaving what he privately wrote, and said, and thought ; by which mankind are enabled as it were to see him live, and to " live o'er each scene" with him, as he actually advanced through the several stages of his life.
Página 78 - I should have gone thro' the thirteen; and, as the previous acquisition of some might facilitate the acquisition of certain others, I arranged them with that view, as they stand above. Temperance first, as it tends to procure that coolness and clearness of head, which is so necessary where constant vigilance was to be kept up, and guard maintained against the unremitting attraction of ancient habits, and the force of perpetual temptations.
Página 78 - INDUSTRY Lose no time; be always employed in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. 7. SINCERITY Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly. 8. JUSTICE Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. 9. MODERATION Avoid extremes; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.
Página 179 - L [Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1833, by William Jay, in the Office of the Clerk of the Southern District of New- York.] MISCELLANEOUS AND OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE.
Página 197 - The inner coat of the stomach, in its natural and healthy state, is of a light or pale pink colour, varying in its hues, according to its full or empty state. It is of a soft or velvet-like appearance, and is constantly covered with a very thin, transparent, viscid mucus, lining the whole interior of the organ.

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