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The trembling notes ascend the sky,

And heavenly joys inspire.
The song began from Jove;
Who left his blissful seats above,
(Such is the power of mighty love!)
A dragon's fiery form bely'd the god *): ..
Sublime on radiant spires he rode,

When he to fair Olympia press’d,

And while he sougıt' her snowy breast:
Then, round her slender waist be curl'd,
And stamp'd an image of himself, a sovereign of the world.
The listening crowd admire the lofty sound,
A present deity, they shout around:
A present deity, the vaulted roofs rebound:

With ravish'd ears
The monarch hears,
Assumes the god,

Affects to nod,
And seems to shake the spberes.

Chorus
With ravish'd ears
The monarch hears,
Assumes the god,

Affects to nod,
And seems to shake the spheres.

land, verfertigte starke und männliche Gesangweisen, dergleichen am meisten nach Alexanders Geschmack waren. Durch die Phrygische hatte er ihn einst so ausser sich gesetzt, dass er qafsprang und zu den Waffen griff. Auf diesen kleinen historischen Umstand hat Dryden sein Gedicht gegründet.

) In der berühmten Nachriche von Alexandern dem Betrüger schreibt Lucian: Zu Pella in Macedonien sahert sie eine Art von ungewöhnlich grossen Schlangen oder Drachen, die so sanft und zahm sind, dass sie von Weibern wie andere Hausthiere aufgezogen wurden, bei den Kindern schlafen, sich ohne böse zu werden, necken und treten lassen, ja sogar wie Säuglinge an die Brust gelegt werden, anstatt jener die Milch auszuziehen. Sie sind in dieser Gegend sehr gemein, und ver.. muthlich ist das alte Mährchen, das von der Königin Olympias erzählt wird, daher entstanden, weil sie vielleicht eine solche Schlange bei sich schlafen liefs, als sie mit Alexandern schwanger ging. S. den 'gten Theil der inucianischen Werke, übersetzt von Wieland.

DI.
The praise of Bacchus then the sweet musician sung;

Of Bacchu's, ever fair and ever young:
* The jolly god, in triumph comes ;
Sound the trumpeis; beat the drums;.

Flush'd with a purple grace

He shews his honest face: Now give the hautboys breath; he comes,

he comes.
Bacchus, ever fair and young,

Drinking joys did first ordain;
Bacchus' blessings are a treasure,
Drinking is the soldier's pleasure,

Rich the treasure,

Sweet the pleasure;
Sweet is pleasure after pain.

Chorus
Bacchus' blessings are a treasure,
Drinking is the soldier's pleasure;

Rich the treasure,

Sweet the pleasure ;
Sweet is pleasure after pain.

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IV.
Sooth'd with the sound, the king grow vain;

Fought all his battles o'er again;
And thrice he routed all his foes; and thrice he slew the slain.

The master saw the madness rise;
His glowing cheeks, bis ardent eyes ;
And, while he heaven and earth defy'd,
Chang'd his hand, and check'd his pride.

He chose a mournful Muse,

Soft pity to infuse:
He sung Darius great and good,

By too severe a fate,
Fallen, fallen, fallen, fallen,
Fallen from his high estate,

And welt'ring in his blood;
Deserted, at his utmost need ,
By those his former bounty fed:
On the bare earth expos'd he lies,
With not a friend to close his eyes.
With down - cast looks the joyless victor sate

Revolving in his alter'd soul

The various turns of chance below; And now and then a sigh he stole; And tears began to flow.

Chorus Revolving in his alter'd soul

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The various turns of chance below,
And now and then a sigh he stole ;

And tears began to flow.,

V.
The mighty master smild, to see
That love was in the next degree:

'Twas but a kindred sound to move; For pity melts the mind to love.

Softly sweet, in Lydian measures,

Soon he sooth'd his soul to pleasuręs.
War, he sung, is toil and trouble;
Honour but an empty bubble;

Never ending, still beginning,
Fighting still, and still destroying :

If the world be worth thy winning,
Think, O think, it worth enjoying:

Lovely Thais sits beside thee,

Take the good the gods provide thee.
The
many

rend the skies with loud applause;
So. Love was crown'd, but Music won the cause.
The prince, unable to conceal his pain

Gaz'd on the fair

Who caus'd his care,
And sigh'd and look'd, sigh'd and look'd,
Sigh'd and look'd, and sigh'd again:
At lenght, with love and wine at once oppress'd,
The vanquish'd victor sunk upon her breast.

Chorus
The prince, unable to conceal his pain

Gaz'd on the fair

Who caus'd his care,
And sigh'd and look'd, sigh'd and look’d,

Sigh'd and look'd, and sigh'd again :
At length, with love and wine at once oppressid,
The vanquish'd victor sunk upon her breast.

VI.
Now strike the golden lyre again:
And louder yet, and yet a louder strain.
Break his bands of sleep asunder,
And rouse him, like a rattling peal of thunder.
Hark, hark, the horrid sound -

Has rais'd up his head:

As awak'd from the dead,
And amaz'd, he stares around.
Revenge, revenge, Timotheus cries,

See the furies arise,
See the snakes that they rear,

How they hiss in their hair,
And the sparkles that flash from their eyes!

Behold a ghastly band,
Each a torch in his hand !
Those are Grecian gliosis, that in battle were slain,

And unbury'd remain

Inglorious on the plain:
Give the veageance due

To the valiant crew :
Behold how they loss their torches on high,

How they point to the Persian abodes,
And glittering temples of their hostile gods ).

The princes applaud, with a furious joy:
And the king seiz'd a flambeau with zeal to destroy;

Thais led the way **),

To light him to his prey,
And, like another Helen, fir'd another Troy.

*) Die Perser verachteten die Vielgötterei. Als der Persie sche König Ka mbyses in Agypten den Tempel der Kabiren he suchte, welche man als Götter verehrte, und wovon man glaub. te, dass es sehr gefährlich wäre, sie zu beleidigen, trieb er ein Gespott mit der Zwergbildern derselben, und liess den Tempel verbrennen. Dem Apis, dem göttlich verehrten Stier der Agypter, stiefs er den Doloh in die Seite, und liefs die Priester des selben geisseln. Der König Darius Ochis liels den Apis sogar schlachten und verzehrte ihn mit seinen Hofleuten.

*) Thais, eine Athenienserin, wünschte bei dem königlie chen Gastmahl zu Persepolis die Ehre zu haben, der Pallast des Xerxes, welcher Athen eingeäschert hatte, mit eigner Hand anzuzünden. Ihre Rede fand bei den betruirkenen Gästen Deifall und Alexander selbst ergriff eine Fackel. Plutarch

Cursus. And the king seiz'd a flambeaul with zeal to destroy ;

Thais id the way

To light him to his prey,
And, like another Helen ,fir'd another Troy.

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VII.
Thus, long ago,
Ere heaving bellows learn'd to blow,

While organs yet were mute;
Timotheus 10 his breathing flute,

And sounding lyre,
Could swell the soul to rage, or kindle soft desire.

At last divine Cecilia came,

Inventress of the vocal frame;
The sweet enthusiast, from her sacred store,

Enlarg'd the former narrow bounds,

And added length to solemn sounds, With nature's mother-wit, and arts unknowa before.

Let old Timotheus yield the prize,

Or both divide the crown:
He rais'd a mortal to the skies;
She drew an angel down.

Grand Chor us.
At last divine Cecilia came,

Inventress of the vocal frame;
The sweet enthusiast, from her saored store,

Enlarg'd the former narrow bounds,

And added length to solemn sounds, With nature's mother-wit, and arts unknown before.

Let old Timotheus yield the prize,

Or both divide the crown;
He rais'd a mortal to the skies;

She drew an angel down.

im Leben Alexanders. Auch Arrian und Strabo berichten, dass man nur den königlichen Pallast verbrannt habe. Curtius schreibt, dass die ganze Stadt verbrannt worden sey. Auch Plinius nennt Persepolis eine von Alexandern zerstörte Stadt.

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