Works, Volúmenes2-3

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J. Wiley & sons, 1887
 

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What power we have over impressions of sense
21
Ultimate conclusions universal
22
How rewarded
23
Errors induced by the power of habit
24
The large scope of matured judgment
25
The danger of a spirit of choice
26
And criminality
27
With what liabilities to error
28
The term beauty how limitable in the outset Divided into typical and vital
29
Of False Opinions held concerning Beauty 1 Of the false opinion that truth is beauty and vice versa
30
Of the false opinion that beauty is usefulness Compare Chap xii 5
31
But never either creates or destroys the essence of beauty
32
Of the false opinion that beauty depends on the association of ideas
33
Association accidental The extent of its intiuence
34
The dignity of its function
35
How it is connected with impressions of beauty
36
First of Infinity or the Type of Divine Incomprehensibility 1 Impossibility of adequately treating the subject
38
The child instinct respecting space
39
Continued in after life
40
Infinity how necessary in art
41
Conditions of its necessity
42
sion of infinity
43
Examples among the Southern schools
44
Among the painters of landscape
45
The beauty of curvature
46
The beauty of gradation
47
How necessary in Art
48
Infinity not rightly implied by vastness
49
Of Unity or the Type of the Divine Compre hensiveness 1 The general conception of divine Unity
50
The several kinds of unity Subjectional Original Of sequence and of membership
51
Unity of membership How secured
52
Variety Why required
53
Change and its influence on beauty
54
The love of change How morbid and evil
55
And towards unity of sequence
57
The value of apparent proportion in curvature
60
How by nature obtained
61
Error of Burke in this matter
62
Constructive proportion Its influence in plants
63
And animals
64
Of Repose or the Type of Divine Perma nence 1 Universal feeling respecting the necessity of repose in art Its sources
65
Of Moderation or the Type of Government
81
plants
92
Especially with respect to animals
93
And it is destroyed by evidences of mechanism
95
The second perfection of the theoretic faculty as concerned with life is justice of moral judgment
96
How impeded
97
11 As also in plants
99
Recapitulation
100
Secondly as Generic 1 The beauty of fulfilment of appointed function in every animal
101
The two senses of the word ideal Either it refers to ac tion of the imagination
103
Of Ideal form First in the lower animals
104
Ideal form in vegetables
105
Admits of variety in the ideal of the former
106
Ideal form in vegetables destroyed by cultivation
107
Instance in the Soldanella and Ranunculus
108
The ideality of Art
109
The right use of the model
121
Practical principles deducible
122
Portraiture ancient and modern
123
How connected with impurity of color
124
Or by severity of drawing
125
And modern art
126
Holy fear how distinct from human terror
127
Such expressions how sought by painters powerless and
129
It is never to be for itself exhibitedat least on the face
130
Recapitulation
131
General Conclusions respecting the Theo retic Faculty 1 There are no sources of the emotion of beauty more than those found in things visible
133
What imperfection exists in visible things How in a sort by imagination removable
134
What objections may be made to this conclusion
135
How interrupted by false feeling
136
Greatness and truth are sometimes by the Deity sustained and spoken in and through evil men
137
The second objection arising from the coldness of Christian men to external beauty
138
Of the Three Forms of Imagination 1 A partial examination only of the imagination is to be at tempted
142
The works of the metaphysicians how nugatory with respect to this faculty
143
4 This instance nugatory
144
Various instances
145
The three operations of the imagination Penetrative associ ative contemplative
146
Of Imagination Associative 1 Of simple conception
147
How connected with verbal knowledge
148
Characteristics of composition
149
What powers are implied by it The first of the three func tions of fancy
150
Imagination is the correlative conception of imperfect compo nent parts
151
The grasp and dignity of imagination
152
Its limits
153
How manifested in treatment of uncertain relations Its de ficiency illustrated
154
Laws of art the safeguard of the unimaginative
155
The monotony of unimaginative treatment
156
Imagination never repeats itself
157
Modification of its manifestation
158
Its presence Salvator Nicolo Poussin Titian Tintoret
159
And Turner
160
The due function of Associative imagination with respect to nature
161
Of Imagination Penetrative
163
Of Imagination Contemplative
192
Of the Superhuman Ideal
212
ADDENDA
225
Explanation of the term theoretic
1
The inconsistency among the effects of the mental virtues
8
Reasons for this coldness in the anxieties of the world These
10
And what caution it renders necessary in the examination
12
the form 116
32
them 36
36
Secondly Naturalist 77
77
86
86
Is a sign of Gods kind purpose towards the race 116
116
Consequent separation and difference of ideals 117
117
anxieties overwrought and criminal 139
139
Evil consequences of such coldness 140
140
Of the Novelty of Landscape 144
144
Of the Pathetic Fallacy 152
152
but apprehending of things 163
163
Of the Teachers of Turner
308
APPENDIX
333

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Página 91 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals • Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Página 39 - From God who is our home. Heaven lies about us in our infancy. Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing boy; But he beholds the light and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy. The youth who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's priest, And, by the vision splendid, Is on his way attended. At length the man perceives it die away And fade into the light of common day.
Página 276 - Oh, what a tangled web we weave, When first we practise to deceive...
Página 282 - Fear and trembling Hope, Silence and Foresight ; Death the Skeleton And Time the Shadow ; — there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship ; or in mute repose To lie, and listen to the mountain flood Murmuring from Glaramara's inmost caves, 1803.
Página 197 - Sweet flower ! for by that name at last, When all my reveries are past, I call thee, and to that cleave fast, Sweet silent creature ! That breath'st with me in sun and air, Do thou, as thou art wont, repair My heart with gladness, and a share Of thy meek nature ! TO THE SAME FLOWER.
Página 84 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.
Página 167 - Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
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