The Doctrine of Descent and Darwinism

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D. Appleton, 1875 - 334 páginas
 

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Página 162 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.18 Darwin always knew that his views would be controversial. A few days before The Origin of Species appeared, Darwin wrote, in a letter to Wallace, 'God knows what...
Página 342 - The Principles of Mental Physiology. With their Applications to the Training and Discipline of the Mind, and the Study of its Morbid Conditions.
Página 342 - Our Place among Infinities: A Series of Essays contrasting our Little Abode in Space and Time with the Infinities Around us. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6s. The Expanse of Heaven : A Series of Essays on the Wonders of the Firmament.
Página 335 - BASTIAN, MD, FRS The Brain as an Organ of Mind. Prof. AC RAMSAY, LL.D., FRS Earth Sculpture : Hills, Valleys, Mountains, Plains, Rivers, Lakes ; how they were Produced, and how they have been Destroyed.
Página ii - II. Physics and Politics ; or, Thoughts on the Application of the Principles of "Natural Selection " and " Inheritance
Página 339 - ... but can be reduced to similar formula. The work is profusely illustrated, and, without reference to the theory it is designed to expound, will be regarded as a valuable addition to natural history.
Página 160 - Na'geli on plants, and the remarks by various authors with respect to animals, more especially those recently made by Professor Broca, that in the earlier editions of my Origin of Species I perhaps attributed too much to the action of natural selection or the survival of the fittest.
Página 337 - Smith was selected as the ablest man in England to treat the important subject of Foods. His services were secured for the undertaking, and the little treatise he has produced shows that the choice of a writer on this subject was most fortunate, as the book is unquestionably the clearest and best-digested compend of the Science of Foods that has appeared in our language.
Página 337 - Beale of the embodiment of the intellectual functions in the cerebral system, will be found the freshest and most interesting part of his book. Prof. Bain's own theory of the connection between the mental and the bodily part in man is stated by himself to be as follows : There is * one substance, with two sets of properties, two sides, the physical and the mental — a double-faced unity* While, in the strongest manner, asserting the union D.
Página 340 - The author is at home in his subject, and presents his views in an almost singularly clear and satisfactory manner. . . . The volume is a valuable contribution to one of the most difficult, and at the same time one of the most important subjects of investigation at the present day.

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