Reports of the Commissioners of the United States to the International Exhibition Held at Vienna, 1873, Volumen2

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Effect of climate and other influences 10
10
Nitrogenous bodies their composition 12
12
Art Page 44 Kinds of wheat generally sown its color
18
European varieties
19
Prevention of heating
20
Diseases and enemies of wheat
21
Winnowing and separating
22
Removal of oats
23
Separating light grains
24
Separating round seeds
25
A third device
26
Inspection of wheat
27
Removal of beard and bran Bentzs method
28
Scourer
30
The art of unilling 65
31
Ignaz Paur his method
32
Jury classification
33
Grades of product
34
Finer products of grinding
35
Constitution and peculiarities of the flour
36
Motion of the stone
37
Form used in the United States
39
Various forms of grooves
40
Art Page 94 The grain in the mill
41
Ventilation
42
Work of the jury
43
Effect of distance of rolls apart
44
The St Gallen mill
46
The disintegrator
47
Sommary
48
Results of educational representation
49
Purification of grits
50
Purifier used at Pesth
51
Another device
52
Products of the two processes of milling
53
Physical differences in wheat
54
Necessity of preserving glutencells
55
Purification
56
High milling
56
Products of Hungarian high milling
57
Details of Hungarian milling process
59
Flour for Vienna bread
60
Products of the Prague mill
61
Average product of the Hungarian mills
63
Products of low milling
65
American methods
66
Impurities in American wheat
67
Characteristics of flour
68
Art Page 148 Structure of edible grain
70
Effect of milling on the grain
71
Distribution of nitrogen
72
Dempwolffs analysis
73
Nature and cause of grits
74
Chemical examination of flour
75
Conclusion
76
CHAPTER III
77
Fermentation
78
Mitscherlichs observations on growth of yeastplant with outline diagrams
79
Effect of heat on cells effect of solution of sugar
80
Illustration of growth of yeastplant
81
Views of Hassall Blondeau Pasteur and Wiesner
82
What is a ferment
83
Alcoholic fermentation dependent on dynamic condition 133 Brefelds results of research upon alcoholic fermentation
85
Action of limewater in improving texture of dough
86
Production of pressyeast from 1846 to 1872
87
Zettlers mode 193 Pumpernickel of Westphalia
88
Pairs wheatbread
89
Yeast breadmaking 166
90
Substitutes for ferment
91
Phosphatic bread
92
Changes in crust conversion of starch to dextrine
93
Advantage of small over large loaves
94
What is stale bread
95
Results of authors experimental research
96
Loss due to fermentation
97
CHAPTER IV
98
The doughroom
99
The oven
100
How to secure largesized loaves with thin crust
102
Can we have Vienna bread in America?
103
APPENDIX A 230 Dempwolfts investigation of Hungarian wheat and wheat flour from the Pesth walzmühle
104
Processes in the Vienna bakeries 218
105
APPENDIX B 233 Phosphatic bread
109
Liebigs comparison of meats with grain
110
Art Page
112
Experiments of Magendie and Chossat
116
Gluten percentage in various flours 12
117
Condition of phosphorus in the grain 13
118
Peculiarities of various flours 14
120
The Thilenius millstone 40
121
Constituents of plantfood 1
3
A SETTLED POLICY OF ARTPATROXAGE NEEDED
4
THE NEW YORK TIMES ON PATRONAGE PY THE STATE
5
DEVELOPMENT OF ART IN GREAT BRITAIN
6
ACTION OF THE BOARD OF TRADE
7
PARLIAMENTARY GRANTS
8
PURCHASES FROM INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 9
9
Potassium fertilizers 55
55
UNITED STATES 5
5
METHOD OF MAKING AWARDS 6
6
SCIENTIFIC IMPROVEMENT ORIGINATING IN THE UNITED STATES 7
7
WOODBURYS PROCESS 8
8
ALBERTS PROCESS 18
18
WOODBURYTYPES 19
19
Article Page 52 HUNGARY 21
21
RUSSIA 22
22
SANDWICH ISLANDS 22
24
American photography 3
25
Surgery 5
5
Exhibits in general 7
7
anatomy 5 Surgery 9
9
Materia medica and chemistry 12
12
Sanitary department 13
13
Character of exhibit 1
3
Clocks 29
29
THE GREAT WESTMINSTER CLOCK
30
OTHER CLOCKS 32
32
CHAPTER III
34
Extent of exhibit 1
1
THEODOLITES EXHIBITED 6
6
ITS DISADVANTAGES 7
7
PLANETABLES 12 STUPENDORFFS INSTRUMENT 13 AUSTRIAN INSTRUMENTS KRAFT Son STARKE KAMMERER 8
8
SWISS INSTRUMENTS 9
9
ELECTRICAL DEEPSEA THERMOMETER BY SIEMENS 10
10
THE ELECTRICALBRIDGE 11
11
Telescopes 10
13
Measuring apparatus 1
1
ERRATA
4
Characteristics of various starchgranules 69
69
Statistics 68
86
Instruments and systems 1
3
No Page
14
BALANCES SENSIBILITY 33
33
MICROSCOPES RECENT ADVANCES 34
34
Administration 37
37
Electrical apparatus 12
38
Cost OF NEW LINES
43
The cradle and the crèche 2
3
CHAPTER II
10
Salles dAsyle
11
GENERAL EDUCATION
14
HISTORY Origin THE EARLIER TEACHERS THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL
16
Thermometrical apparatus 17
17
Schools for deaf and mute 18
18
CHAPTER IV
23
Laboratory apparatus 27
27
ORIGIN OF SUCH EDUCATION IN THE PRINCIPLES ENUNCIATED BY PEREIRE
32
ENGLISH SCHOOLS Essex Hall
38
The HollandoGerman school 19
43
The Spanish French school 24
49
The Abbé de lEpée and his time 27
64
European schools for idiots 32
75
79
79
85
85
American schools for idiots 41
88
The school as it is and as it should be 48
99
SWEDISH SCHOOLS 19
100
ITALIAN SCHOOLS 101
101
PORTUGUESE SCHOOLS 102
102
BELGIAN SCHOOLS 103
103
EXHIBITIONS OF SCHOOLS AT VIENNA 104
104
THE SCHOOL AS IT SHOULD BE 105
105
FURNITURE 106
106
APPARATUS 108
108
Black bread more nutritious 111
111
CHAPTER III
113
EDUCATION OF TIIE HAND 114
114
EDUCATION OF THE SENSES 115
115
EDUCATION OF THE MEDICAL SENSES 116
116
EDUCATION OF THE INDUSTRIAL SEXSES 117
117
EDUCATION OF TIIE LANGUAGE 119
119
SPECIAL TEACHING GEOGRAPHY 122
122
The scholar his textbooks and teachers 64
123
LESSONS FROM THE WELTAUSSTELLUNG
125
WILL TILEY PROFIT OUR SCHOOL?
127
41
131
HISTORICAL SKETCH RATES 30
132
89
5
History of the South Kensington Museum 7
7
THE PHYSIOLOGICAL INFANTSCHOOL ITS ORIGIN AND BASIS OPPORTUNI
11
The Centennial Exhibition as an opportunity 21
21
THE UNITED STATES BEHIND EUROPE 31
31
BRITISH INDIA 23
35
EXHIBITS 34
36
OTHER COUNTRIES 23
7
WORKINGPLAN 10
10
IMPORTANCE OF SUCH CULTURE NOT APPRECIATED IN THE UNITED STATES 11
11
PhysioLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS SHOULD THE ENCEPHALON HAVE
12
TRUE ART APPRECIATED BY ALL 11
Art of printing 1
1
APPENDIX
4
FRANCE NO LONGER SUPREME IN ART 12
12
Climate of Hungary 15
15
Redness of color in wheat its cause 16
16
MUSEUMS NECESSARY IN THE CULTIVATION OF THE APPLICATION OF ART
17
INDUSTRY 12
18
Lithography 19
19
CONCLUSION 24
24
Manufactures of paper 25
25
National printing office of France 24
3
PATRONAGE NOT SUPPORT NEEDED 12
12
PROPOSED APPOINTMENT OF A GOVERNMENT COMMISSION ON ART 13
13
THE APPROACIIING CENTENNIAL INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OFFERS A PROPER TIME AND FIELD FOR THE INAUGURATION OF ...
14

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