Vindication of Dr. Paley's Theory of Morals from the Principal Objections of Mr. Dugald Stewart, Mr. Gisborne, Dr. Pearson, and Dr. Thomas Brown; with an Apx. Containing Strictures on Some Remarks of Dr. Whately

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Hatchard, 1830 - 204 páginas

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Página 94 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Página 122 - God ; for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is the rewarder of them that diligently seek him.
Página 178 - Cease then ; nor order imperfection name ; Our proper bliss depends on what we blame. Know thy own point: this kind, this due degree Of blindness, weakness, heaven bestows on thee. Submit. In this, or any other sphere, Secure to be as blest as thou canst bear : Safe in the hand of one disposing power, Or in the natal, or the mortal hour.
Página 31 - ... in some solitary place, without any communication with his own species, he could no more think of his own character, of the propriety or demerit of his own sentiments and conduct, of the beauty or deformity of his own mind, than of the beauty or deformity of his own face.
Página 196 - When two species of objects have always been observed to be conjoined together, I can infer, by custom, the existence of one wherever I see the existence of the other: And this I call an argument from experience.
Página 98 - When men have found some general propositions that could not be doubted of as soon as understood, it was, I know, a short and easy way to conclude them innate. This being once received, it eased the lazy from the pains of search, and stopped the inquiry of the doubtful concerning all that was once styled innate. And it was of no small advantage to those who affected to be masters and teachers, to make this the principle of principles, "that principles must not be questioned...
Página 71 - A course of Lectures, containing a description and systematic arrangement of the several branches of Divinity, accompanied with an account both of the principal authors, and of the progress which has been made at different periods, in Theological learning.
Página 35 - great deal of difference between an innate law, and a law of nature; between something imprinted on our minds in their very original, and something that we being ignorant of may attain to the knowledge of, by the use and due application of our natural faculties.
Página 199 - But as all perfection is entirely relative, we ought never to imagine that we comprehend the attributes of this divine Being, or to suppose that his perfections have any analogy or likeness to the perfections of a human creature.
Página 91 - The principle here in question may be taken for an act of the mind; a sentiment; a sentiment of approbation; a sentiment which, when applied to an action, approves of its utility, as that quality of it by which the measure of approbation or disapprobation bestowed upon it ought to be governed.

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