The History of Tom Jones: A Foundling, Volumen4

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F. A. Didot, 1780
 

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Picked up this entire set in excellent condition at a library sponsored used book sale for $60.00. hands down one of my best finds. Leer comentario completo

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Crítica de los usuarios  - donbuch1 - LibraryThing

This classic series represents the Western canon not without academic controversy. The latest volumes of the Great Books include some women writers, but they are still definitely underrepresented ... Leer comentario completo

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II
49
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126
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193
VIII
255

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Página 159 - Partridge gave that credit to Mr. Garrick which he had denied to Jones, and fell into so violent a trembling that his knees knocked against each other. Jones asked him what was the matter, and whether he was afraid of the warrior upon the stage. 'O la ! sir,' said he, 'I perceive now It is what you told me.
Página 163 - He the best player!" cries Partridge, with a contemptuous sneer, "why, I could act as well as he myself. I am sure, if I had seen a ghost, I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did. And then, to be...
Página 159 - Whatever happens it is good enough for you. Follow you? I'd follow the devil as soon. Nay, perhaps it is. the devil — for they say he can put on what likeness he pleases. Oh ! here he is again. No farther! No, you have gone far enough already; farther than I'd have gone for all the king's dominions.
Página 158 - In the first row then of the first gallery did Mr. Jones, Mrs. Miller, her youngest daughter, and Partridge, take their places. Partridge immediately declared it was the finest place he had ever been in. When the first music was played, he said, "It was a wonder how so many fiddlers could play at one time, without putting one another out.
Página 162 - Ay, ay, you may sing. You had rather sing than work, I believe." Upon Hamlet's taking up the skull, he cried out, " Well, it is strange to see how fearless some men are. I never could bring myself to touch...
Página 160 - I know there is nothing in them: not that it was the ghost that surprised me, neither; for I should have known that to have been only a man in a strange dress; but when I saw the little man so frightened himself, it was that which took hold of me." "And dost thou imagine, then, Partridge," cries Jones, "that he was really frightened?
Página 163 - And then, to be sure, in that scene, as you called it, between him and his mother, where you told me he acted so fine, why, Lord help me, any man, that is, any good man, that had such a mother, would have done exactly the same.
Página 49 - THERE are a set of religious, or rather moral writers, who teach that virtue is the certain road to happiness, and vice to misery, in this world. A very wholesome and comfortable doctrine, and to which we have but one objection, namely, that it is not true.
Página 194 - ... for we had rather relate that he was hanged at Tyburn, (which may very probably be the case,) than forfeit our integrity, or shock the faith of our reader.
Página 159 - I perceive now it is what you told me. I am not afraid of anything, for I know it is but a play; and, if it was really a ghost, it could do one no harm at such a distance, and in so much company; and yet, if I was frightened, I am not the only person.

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