Aristotle on the Art of Poetry: An Amplified Version with Supplementary Illustrations for Students of English

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Ginn, 1913 - 101 páginas
 

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Página 93 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus ; but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.
Página xv - I mean not here the prosody of a verse, which they could not but have hit on before among the rudiments of grammar...
Página xv - Tasso, Mazzoni, and others, teaches what the laws are of a true epic poem, what of a dramatic, what of a lyric, what decorum is, which is the grand masterpiece to observe.
Página xvi - Aristotle, I have been told, has said, that Poetry is the most philosophic of all writing: it is so: its object is truth, not individual and local, but general, and operative...
Página 27 - It may be safely affirmed that there neither is, nor can be, any essential difference between the language of prose and metrical composition.
Página 31 - The poet and the historian differ not by writing in verse or in prose. The work of Herodotus might be put into verse, and it would still be a species of history, with metre no less than without it. The true difference is that one relates what has happened, the other what may happen. Poetry, therefore, is a more philosophical and a higher thing than history, for poetry tends to express the universal, history the particular.
Página 58 - I have often observed that, on mimicking the looks and gestures of angry, or placid, or frighted, or daring men, I have involuntarily found my mind turned to that passion whose appearance I endeavoured to imitate...
Página xvi - ... you images of true matters, such as indeed were done, and not such as fantastically or falsely may be suggested to have been done.
Página 28 - We have laid it down that a tragedy is an imitation of an action that is complete in itself, as a whole of some magnitude; for a whole may be of no magnitude to speak of. Now a whole is that which has beginning, middle, and end.
Página xvi - I adopt with full faith the principle of Aristotle, that poetry as poetry is essentially * ideal, that it avoids and excludes all accident; that its apparent individualities of rank, character, or occupation must be representative of a class...

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