History of the Inductive Sciences, from the Earliest to the Present Times, Volumen1

Portada
John W. Parker, 1837
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 232 - Before her, fancy's gilded clouds decay, And all its varying rainbows die away. Wit shoots in vain its momentary fires, The meteor drops, and in a flash expires. As one by one, at dread Medea's strain, The sick'ning stars fade off th' ethereal plain; As Argus
Página 178 - Rather admire; or if they list to try Conjecture, he his fabric of the Heavens Hath left to their disputes, perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter, when they come to model Heaven And calculate the stars, how they will wield The mighty frame; how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances; how gird the sphere With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb...
Página xxxvi - But a just story of learning, containing the antiquities and originals of knowledges and their sects, their inventions, their traditions, their diverse administrations and managings, their flourishings, their oppositions, decays, depressions, oblivions, removes, with the causes and occasions of them, and all other events concerning learning, throughout the ages of the world, I may truly affirm to be wanting.
Página 388 - The Discovery of a New World ; or, a Discourse tending to prove that it is probable there may be another habitable World in the Moon ; with a Discourse concerning the possibility of a passage thither.
Página 388 - Rise on the earth ; or earth rise on the sun • He from the east his flaming road begin; Or she from west her silent course advance, With inoffensive pace that spinning sleeps On her soft axle, while she paces even, And bears thee soft with the smooth air along; Solicit not thy thoughts with matters hid; Leave them to God above.
Página 42 - Aristotle, in a passage already cited, "decides that there is no void on such arguments as this : in a void there could be no difference of up and down; for as in nothing there are no differences, so there are none in a privation or negation; but a void is merely a privation or negation...
Página 385 - ... nature, as when he makes- the sun and stars immovable, the bodies which are peculiarly lucid and radiant, and his making the moon adhere to the earth in a sort of epicycle, and some other things which he assumes, are proceedings which mark a man who thinks nothing of introducing fictions of any kind into nature, provided his calculations turn out well.
Página 4 - I remark, that to the formation of science, two things arc requisite :— Facts and Ideas ; observation of Things without, and an inward effort of Thought ; or, in other words, Sense and Reason. Neither of these elements, by itself, can constitute substantial general knowledge.
Página xxxvi - The use and end of which work, I do not so much design for curiosity or satisfaction of those that are...
Página 132 - This disregard is neither supercilious nor causeless. The constellations seem to have been almost purposely named and delineated to cause as much confusion and inconvenience as possible. Innumerable snakes twine through long and contorted areas of the heavens, where no memory can follow them ; bears, lions, and fishes, large and small, northern and southern, confuse all nomenclature, &c. A better system of constellations might have been a material help as an artificial memory.

Información bibliográfica