The Prophecies of the Brahan Seer: (Coinneach Odhar Fiosaiche)

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A. & W. Mackenzie, 1882 - 156 páginas
 

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Página 153 - Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill, and said: Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious. For as I passed by, and beheld your devotions, I found an altar with this inscription, To the unknown God. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship, Him declare I unto you.
Página 114 - by reason the King is the greatest enemy he hath in the world'; all which their [c]onfessions and depositions are still extant upon record...
Página 113 - ... that upon the night of All-hallawn-even last she was accompanied as well with the persons aforesaid, as also with a great many other witches, to the number of two hundred, and that...
Página 118 - Late in an autumnal evening in the year 1773, the son of a neighbouring gentleman came to my father's house. He and my mother were from home, but several friends were in the house. The young gentleman spoke little, and seemed absorbed in deep thought. Soon after he arrived, he inquired for a boy of the family, then about three years of age. When...
Página 105 - That name does not belang to me ; I'm but the Queen o' fair Elfland, That am hither come to visit thee. "Harp and carp, Thomas...
Página 150 - ... his friend, and sat down on a bank to wait his coming ; but he waited long — lonely and dejected ; and then remembering that he for whom he waited was dead, he burst into tears. At this moment a large field-bee came humming from the west, and began to fly round his head. He raised his hand to brush it away ; it widened its circle, and then came humming into his ear as before. He raised his hand a second time, but the bee...
Página 93 - Thy sons rose around thee in light and in love, All a father could hope, all a friend could approve ; What vails it the tale of thy sorrows to tell, — In the spring time of youth and of promise they fell ! Of the line of Fitzgerald remains not a male, To bear the proud name of the Chief of K'intail.
Página 74 - Seaforth will, ere many generations have passed, end in extinction and in sorrow. I see a chief, the last of his house, both deaf and dumb. He will be the father of four fair sons, all of whom he will follow to the tomb. He will live...
Página 113 - ... with flagons of wine, making merry and drinking by the way in the same riddles or sieves, to the kirk* of North Berwick in Lothian; and that after they had landed, took hands on the land and danced this reel or short dance, singing all with one voice:— Commer* go ye before, commer go ye; If ye will not go before, commer let me.
Página 98 - Roman poets, as well as by the various sculptured figures which have been brought to light in modern times. Jupiter, the son of Saturn, was the chief God. But even the great Jupiter himself did not enjoy unmolested his supreme dignity, for the offspring of Titan, a race of terrible giants, set Jupiter at defiance. They piled the mountains of Pelion and Ossa on the top of each other, and endeavoured to ascend into heaven, and to pull Jupiter down from his throne. The gods, in great alarm, fled from...

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