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barren and uncultivated ; and what important discoveries have been made in the arts and sciences interesting to mankind. We shall find in time, in our Bibliographic Account, a very curious and instructive part of the history of our own time, and that of the human mind and its labours, or an epitome of the literary and scientific history of the age.

XXI. OF CERTAIN PARTICULAR ACCOUNTS ATTACHED TO THE,

ANALYTICAL JOURNAL, AND NOT BELONGING EXCLUSIVELY TO ANY OF THE THREE JOURNALS, PHYSICAL, MORAL, AND INTELLECTUAL, viz.

1. Use and Construction of the Daily Memorial, properly so

called;

2. Special Account for the Employment of Time, considered in general;

3. Various Notes and Memorandums.

1. The daily memorial, or thermometer, the use of which was recommended in the ninth chapter, and all the developments of which are embraced in the different general and particular accounts that have been since described, ought to be very simply constructed, that the task of keeping it may be as easy and agreeable as it is useful and beneficial. It may be composed of only three articles, each requiring one or two lines at most, for every twenty-four hours. It will express in a

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few words the number of hours allotted to each of the three great divisions, and the daily physical, moral, and intellectual temperature of the person to whom it relates. It will faithfully exhibit his real situation, either progressive, stationary, or retrograde, in regard to those three points. By comparing these successive, but connected statements, we shall easily judge whether there is a deviation, stagnation, or progression ; for the daily examination, summed up in writing, as a foundation for this judgment, will serve for a point of support. We shall always be in time co stop, by accurate and continuous observations, the necessary results of the constant practice of our method, any deviation, which, if not watched and checked, would in the end destroy the health of the body, of the mind, and of the soul. We shall give frequent concussions to the habits of life, physical, moral, and intellectual, which will prevent us from falling into stagnation and sluggishness. Motion and activity, for keeping all the faculties in play, in equilibrium, and in harmony, are principles of strength and health. Lastly, we shall be in constant readiness to promote the state of progression or melioration.

2. A distinct account ought to be opened for the employment of time, considered as a real and

highly important science, and as the ground-work of happiness. Here will be successively entered the observations suggested by our own experience on the daily application, the comparative advantages and disadvantages, and the improvement of the different parts or conditions composing the method of employing time, which we have chosen for the rule of our lives.

3. The miscellaneous account, for memorandums of various particulars that we have occasion to commit to writing, will form a sort of agenda, similar to those already kept by most persons who have much business to transact, for the assistance of their memory. These consist of memorandums relative to professional matters, visits, engagements of every kind, to their past speculations and their future plans. By this expedient they are enabled the better to regulate the employment of their days, to do more, and that better, in a given time. All methods, when thoroughly understood, must have the twofold effect of abridging and meliorating.

This miscellaneous account may also include whatever concerns a person's family, his children, if he has any, his parents, friends and relations, and generally such memorandums as he may wish to refer to occasionally, and the plans and recollections which it may be either useful or agreeable to preserve in writing. *

XXII. SECOND AND LAST AUXILIARY CONDITION, SERVING AS A

COMPLEMENT TO THE PROPOSED METHOD FOR REGULATING
THE USEFUL EMPLOYMENT OF TIME.---Choice Of A SINCERE
AND SEVERE FRIEND, TO WHOM TO SUBMIT THE STATEMENT
OF OUR PHYSICAL, MORAL, AND INTELLECTUAL SITUATION,
EVERY THREE OR SIX MONTHS, OR ONLY ONCE A-YEAR.

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A second and last auxiliary condition promises great advantages for the success of our method;

* It must not be forgotten that the use of leading words, references to articles which have a correspondence with one another, an analytical table and alphabetical index, drawn up on the plan of the ingenious Locke, and placed at the end of each journal, will render it easy to turn to, and read in succession all the passages in any of these accounts, relating to one subject, which are thus connected together, and serve to illustrate each other.

The general division of the journal into several different parts, each having its specific destination, admits of giving to these various accounts an extent proportionate to their respective degrees of importance, and to the greater or less abundance of the materials which may offer themselves to the mind, without our being ever liable to confound them. It may not be amiss to repeat, that half an hour, at most, every day, will be sufficient for keeping these different accounts posted up, since there are many in which there will be no occasion to make entries, but at. longer or shorter intervals. We have already treated of the advantages likely to result from them.

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for the more we are convinced of its excellence and utility, the more we should strive to ensure its being invariably followed.

The daily journal, the three general accounts, and the other particular accounts, are the results either of the review of each day, or of observations collected at different periods. They furnish the means of judging whether we advance in the career which we purpose to pursue, whether we stand still, or whether we recede: in short, whether we are in a progressive, stationary, or retrograde state. The retrograde state is fraught with disadvantages and calamities; the health declines, the heart becomes depraved, and the understanding obscured. The stationary state exhibits the image of stagnant water, which at length becomes putrid and unwholesome. The progressive state, by expanding and improving all the faculties, is the only one capable of meliorating individuals, and giving prosperity to nations.

A person who travels with a view to acquire information will not be satisfied with driving post haste through provinces and cities, taking a glance at the country, and snatching a view as he passes of the monuments of the arts, the prodigies of industry, the useful establishments, and the objects of curiosity. He will purposely make fre

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