Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

OFFICERS OF THE CONFERENCE DURING ITS FIRST DECADE.

[blocks in formation]

D. HANBURY, F.L.S. W.W. STODDART, F.G.S.

H. S. EVANS, F.C.S.
W. W. STODDART, F.C.S. · H. C. BAILDON J. INCE, F.L.S., F.C.S.

[blocks in formation]

INAUGURAL MEETING HELD AT NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE IN 1863.

Year.

Place of
Meeting.

President.

Vice Presidents.

1864

Bath

!

1865

Birmingham

1866

Nottingham

1867

Dundee

1868

Norwich

>

Prof. BENTLEY

R. W. Giles, F.C.S.
HENRY DEANE, F.L.S..

Dr. EDWARDS, F.C.S. Prof. REDWOOD
Prof. BENTLEY

J. P. TYLEE
HENRY DEANE, F.L.S. .
1 Dr. EDWARDS

W. SOUTĦALL
DR. EDWARDS

SAMUEL PARR
Prof. BENTLEY, F.L.S..

s D. HANBURY, F.L.S. D. RUSSELL
Prof. BENTLEY, F.L.S..

1 W.W. STODDART, F.G.S. J. INCE, F.L.S.

SW.W. STODDART, F.G.S. R. FITCH, F.G.S.
DANIEL HANBURY, F.R.S.

J. INCE, F.L.S.

J. R. YOUNG
ŞW.W. STODDART, F.G.S. G. COOPER
DANIEL HANBURY, F.R.S.
J. INCE, F.L.S.

H. S. Evans, F.C.S.
J. ABRAHAM

J. ABRAHAM

J. INCE, F.L.S.
W. W. STODDART, F.C.S. . 8. C. BAILDON J. WILLIAMS, F.C.S.
SJ. INCE, F.C.S.

R. REYNOLDS, F.C.S.
H. B. BRADY, F.L.S.

J. WILLIAMS, F.C.S. W. D. SAVAGE

T. H. Hills, F.C.S. W. D. SAVAGE
H. B. BRADY, F.L.S. J. WILLIAMS, F.C.S. F. M. RIMMINGTON.

R. REYNOLDS, F.C.S.

1869 Exeter

1870

Liverpool

1871 | Edinburgh

1872 | Brighton.

1873 Bradford.

5 1864 to 1870, H. B. BRADY, F.L.S., F.C.S. TREASURERS

1870 to 1872, G. F. SCHACHT.

GENERAL
SECRETARIES

1864 to 1873, Prof. ATTFIELD, Ph. D., F.C.S. 1864 to 1871, RICHARD REYNOLDS, F.C.S. 1871 to 1873, F. BADEN BENGER, THE

AN ORGANIZATION ESTABLISHED IN 1863 FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH, AND THE PROMOTION OF FRIENDLY INTERCOURSE AND UNION AMONGST PHARMACISTS.

any

The most important ways in which a member can aid the objects of the Conference are by suggesting subjects for investigation, working upon subjects suggested by himself or by others, contributing information tending to throw light on questions relating to adulterations and impurities, or collecting and forwarding specimens whose examination would afford similar information. Personal attendance at the yearly gatherings, or the mere payment of the annual subscription, will also greatly strengthen the hands of the executive.

A list of subjects suggested for research, is sent to members early in the year. Resulting papers are read at the annual meeting of the members ; but new facts that are discovered during an investigation may be at once published by an author at a meeting of a scientific society, or in a scientific journal, or in other

way

he may desire ; in that case, he is expected to send a short report on the subject to the Conference.

The annual meetings are held in the provinces, and usually at the time and place of the visit of the British Association. That for 1873 will be held in Bradford, commencing on Tuesday, September 16th.

Gentlemen desiring to join the Conference, can be nominated at any time on applying to either of the secretaries or any other officer or member. The yearly subscription is five shillings, with an addi. tional sixpence for the postage of the Year-Book. Further information may be obtained from the secretaries.

PROFESSOR ATTFIELD, 17, Bloomsbury Square, London, W.C.
F. BADEN BENGER, Market Place, Manchester.

THE YEAR-BOOK OF PHARMACY. The Conference annually presents to members a volume of about 600 pages, containing the proceedings at the yearly meeting, and an Annual Report on the Progress of Pharmacy, or Year-Book, which includes notices of all pharmaceutical papers, new processes, prepa· rations, and formulæ published throughout the world. The necessary funds for accomplishing this object, can probably be obtained without making any charge for the volume in addition to the annual subscription, and sixpence postage (total, five shillings and sixpence), if a large number of members be enrolled. The Executive Committee, therefore, call on every pharmacist-principal, assistant, or pupil—to offer his name for election, and on every member to make an effort to obtain more members. The price of the Year-Book to non-members is seven shillings and sixpence. The constitution and rules of the Conference, and a form of nomination for membership, will be found at page 403.

INTRODUCTION.

Among the new remedies which have come into vogue during the past year, the most notable is condurango. The bark of a plant growing in Colombia, it was introduced into this country from America as a specific remedy for cancer. It soon attracted considerable attention, and its botanical and chemical history became matters of active investigation. The eminent botanist, M. Triana, has shown that it is derived from a species of Gonolobus belonging to the Asclepiadaceæ, and named by him Gonolobus condurango. The bark was submitted to chemical analysis by Dr. Antisell, in America, and by G. Vulpius, in Germany, and found to contain a resinous matter, to which whatever activity it possesses ought to be attributed. The result of its trial in Europe, however, led to disappointment. It was found to have no specific power against true cancer, and its market value, which at first was very high, gradually fell to a few pence per pound.

A new remedy has been introduced in Berlin for the treatment of small-pox, and used in the hospitals there with great success. This body is xylol, a liquid hydro-carbon, obtained from coal-tar, having the composition C, H10, and therefore homologous with phenyl, the radical of carbolic acid. It is given in doses of from three to fifteen drops every two or three hours, and is conveniently administered in capsules.

Considerable confusion for some time existed between carbolic acid and creosote, the products respectively of coal-tar and wood-tar. When carbolic acid was first discovered, the two bodies were regarded as identical, and although the constitution of carbolic acid was easily demonstrated, that of creosote remained much longer in obscurity. This confusion led to the substitution of one body for the other, and hitherto much of the creosote of commerce has consisted simply of carbolic acid.

The researches of Hlasiwetz have shown that true creosote consists chiefly of the ether of creosol, a body having the composition C,H, Oz. Creosol is the homologue of guaiacol, C, H, 0,

B

which is formed by the dry distillation of guaiacum resin. GorupBesanez, who has also investigated this subject, states that the several varieties of wood-tar creosote are mixtures of compound ethers of guaiacol and creosol, the former predominating in Rhenish beech tar éreosote, the latter in Moravian and English creosote, which are probably prepared from pine-wood tar. Gorup-Besanez also avers that Rhenish creosote contains in addition phenol (carbolic acid). This statement is confirmed by Frisch and also by Marasse. Whether phenol is a normal constituent of Rhenish beech creosote or not, it is certain that it has not been detected in English creosote, which is composed chiefly of a derivative of creosol, and as this body possesses for many purposes antiseptic properties superior to those of carbolic acid, it would appear that the English product should be preferred. Several tests have been suggested from time to time for distinguishing between carbolic acid and creosote. The simplest and best, probably, is that recently published by Mr. Morson. He shows that creosote is not miscible with concentrated glycerin, while carbolic acid, as is well-known, will mix in all proportions.

Mr. J. Williams has recently prepared pure guaiacol from guaiacum resin, and compared its properties with creosote. The results were embodied in a paper read at the Conference meeting, and will be found in the report of the proceedings.

Creosol and guaiacol are the homologues of pyrocatechin ; these bodies in fact form a series. Pyracatechin

Co H. 02
Guaiacol

C, H, O,
Creosol

C, H, O, Pyrocatechin, or oxyphenic acid as it is sometimes termed, is produced by the dry distillation of several varieties of tannin, and may also be formed by the action of hydriodic acid on guaiacol. Hoppe-Seyler has recently shown that pyrocatechin occurs among the products of the action of water at an elevated temperature on cellulose, starch, or sugar. Gorup-Besanez has also detected pyrocatechin occurring ready formed in the green leaves of the Virginian creeper. Moreover, Eisfeldt showed that Malabar kino always contains this body; and Flückiger has recently contended that it is derived from the sap of the plant, and is not formed during the drying of the kino.

A new form for the outward application of mercury has been recommended by Professor J. Marshall. Many years ago Mr. Donovan

.

« AnteriorContinuar »