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(The above composition has long been known, and is noticed only on account of its proportions, they forming a better cement than any of those given by writers on chemical technology.)

Diamond Cement. J. Tully. (Pharm. Journ., 3rd series, ii., 797.) Isinglass, soaked in water until soft, then dissolved in the smallest quantity of acetic acid by the aid of a gentle heat. In zij. of this, dissolve grs. x. of ammoniacum, and add a solution of zss. of mastic in ziij. spirits of wine ; stir well together.

To make Tungstic Glue. Tungstic glue bids fair to be an acceptable substitute for hard indiarubber, now 'so high in price. It is prepared by mixing a thick solution of glue with tungstate of soda and hydrochloric acid, by means of which a compound of tungstic acid and glue is precipitated, which, at a temperature of 86° to 104° Fahrenheit, is sufficiently elastic to admit of being drawn out into very thin sheets. On cooling, this mass becomes solid and brittle; and on being heated, is again soft and plastic. This new compound, it is said, can be used for all the purposes to which hard rubber is adapted.

Chinese Varnish. Dr. v. Scherzer. (Chem. News, vol. xxiv., No. 613, p. 98.) Under the name of schio liao, the Chinese apply as varnish freshly defibrinated blood, mixed with powdered slaked lime, and a small quantity of alum, in the proportion of three parts of previously defibrinated fresh blood, four parts of lime, and a small quantity of powdered alum. The result is the formation of a glutinous yet fluid mass, which is ready for use at once, and especially used for rendering wood perfectly water-tight, and hardening its surface. The author states that he has seen in China bags made of straw, rendered so impervious to liquids by the application of this varnish, as to serve for the transport of oil; while thin millboard painted with this varnish, becomes as hard as wood.

Colouring for Varnish. W. Astelon. (Pharm. Journ., 3rd series, ii., 797.) A solution of saffron in spirit, is the best to give a yellow colour to shellac varnish; but a better way is to first stain the wood, by applying the solution to it, and then varnish.

Imitation Honey. The New York Druggists' Circular states that an imitation of honey, consisting principally of glucose or uncrystallisable sugar, flavoured by elm leaves and other materials, is mannfactured in large quantities. The glucose used in its preparation is mostly made in Europe from corn and potato starch, and is largely imported into the United States, the inferior qualities being used by brewers and distillers. It is dissolved in water, filtered, decolorised if necessary, concentrated by evaporation, and the flavouring material is then added.

Lute for Corks, etc. Robert F. Smith. (Chem. News.) Anthracene acts capitally as a substitute for paraffine (either by itself or mixed with the latter) in covering corks or joints of apparatus requiring to stand a comparatively high temperature. A luting of anthracene is capable of standing a high pressure and temperature combined for a lengthened period.

Marking Ink for Parcels. (Chemist and Druggist.) Dissolve asphaltum, grahamite, albertite, or any mineral of this character in naphtha or oil of turpentine to a thin fluid ; it will dry-quickly, does not spread, and the markings are nearly indestructible.

Native Vegetable Ink. Rev. F. Moig no. (Les Mondes, July 4, 1872, and Chem. News, vol. xxvi., p. 23.) The author states that experiments are being made to acclimatise in Europe the Coriaria thymifolia, or ink-plant of New Grenada. The juice of this plant, locally termed chanchi, is at first of a somewhat reddish colour, but becomes intensely black in a few hours. This juice can be used for writing without requiring any further preparation; it corrodes steel pens less than ordinary ink; and has, moreover, the advantage of better resisting chemical agents. When the portion of America named above was under Spanish dominion, all public documents were written with chanchi, which was not removed from paper by sea-water.

Shoe-Blacking without Acid. Dr. Artus. (Chem. News, vol. xxiv., No. 615, p. 120.) From 3 to 4 lbs. of lamp-black and } lb. of bone-black are well mixed with 5 lbs. of glycerin and treacle. Meanwhile, 2, ozs. of guttapercha are cautiously fused in a copper or iron saucepan, and 10 ozs. of olive oil are added, with continual stirring; and afterwards 1 oz. of stearine. The warm mass is added to the former mixture, and then a solution of 5 ozs. of gum senegal in 12 pts. of water, and 1 drachm each of oil of rosemary and lavender may be added. For use, the blacking is diluted with 3 to 4 parts of water. This blacking keeps the leather soft, and renders it more durable.

Red, Green, and Blue Fire. J. R. Braunschweiger. (Dingl. Polyt. Journ., cci., 178. Journ. Chem. Soc., 2nd series, ix., 970.) Coloured fires, which may be burnt in dwelling-rooms, and are not much influenced by damp, may be made thus :

Red Fire.
Nitrate of strontia .

9 parts.
Shellac.
Chlorate of potash .

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TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

British Pharmaceutical Conference

AT THE

NINTH ANNUAL MEETING

AT

BRIGHTON.

1872.

EDITED BY

PROFESSOR ATTFIELD.

CONTENTS.

CONSTITUTION AND RULES OF THE CONFERENCE.
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF MEMBERS' NAMES AND ADDRESSES.
ALPHABETICAL LISTS OF TOWNS AT WHICH MEMBERS RESIDE.
PROGRAMME OF TRANSACTIONS OF THE CONFERENCE AT BRIGHTON, INCLUDING

TITLES OF PAPERS.
THE TRANSACTIONS OF THE CONFERENCE, INCLUDING THE PAPERS READ, AND

THE DISCUSSIONS THEREON.
GENERAL INDEX TO THE YEAR-BOOK AND TRANSACTIONS.

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