Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volumen143

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William Blackwood, 1888
 

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Página 14 - For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I in the midst of them.
Página 255 - I am as sorry as if the original fault had been my fault, because myself have seen his demeanour no less civil than he excellent in the quality he professes: besides, divers of worship have reported his uprightness of dealing which argues his honesty, and his facetious grace in writing, that approves his art.
Página 104 - I have also said that formerly pictures gave me a considerable and music very great delight. But now for many years I cannot endure to read a line of poetry : I have tried lately to read Shakespeare, and found it so intolerably dull that it nauseated me. I have also almost lost my taste for pictures or music.
Página 619 - Thou the shame, the grief hast known, Though the sins were not Thine own, Thou hast deigned their load to bear : Jesu, Son of Mary, hear...
Página 261 - Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room: Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Página 257 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory, (on this side Idolatry) as much as any). He was (indeed) honest and of an open and free nature : had an excellent Phantsie, brave notions, and gentle expressions : wherein he flowed with that facility, that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped : Sufflaminandus erat ; as Augustus said of Haterius.
Página 177 - I RODE one evening with Count Maddalo Upon the bank of land which breaks the flow Of Adria towards Venice : a bare strand Of hillocks, heaped from ever-shifting sand, Matted with thistles and amphibious weeds, Such as from earth's embrace the salt ooze breeds, Is this ; an uninhabited sea-side, Which the lone fisher, when his nets are dried, Abandons ; and no other object breaks The waste, but one dwarf tree and some few stakes Broken and unrepaired, and the tide makes A narrow space of level sand...
Página 104 - Nature: no one can stand in these solitudes unmoved, and not feel that there is more in man than the mere breath of his body.
Página 177 - This ride was my delight I love all waste And solitary places ; where we taste The pleasure of believing what we see Is boundless, as we wish our souls to be : And such was this wide ocean, and this shore More barren than its billows.
Página 257 - English man of war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, .tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.

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