Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

8vo.

7s. 6d.

The Bridal of Triermain, or the Vale of

A Catalogue of a large and valuable Col. St John ; a poem, in three cantos; the lection of Books, in various languages, which fifth edition; by Walter Scott, Esq. foolscap will be sold by auction, without reserve, by is. 6d.

John Maclachlan, at his Sale-Room, 64, Harold the Dauntless ; a poem, in six South Bridge Street, Edinburgh, on MonCantos ; by the same author, foolscap 8vo. day, February 15, and forty-one following

lawful evenings. In this collection will be Emily, with other Poems; by Thomas found a number of rare and curious Artis Brown, M.D. Professor of Moral Philoso- cles, particularly Books and Tracts relative phy in the University of Edinburgh ; second to the History, Antiquities, and Poetry of edition. 78.

Scotland. Miscellaneous Poems, extracted from the Edinburgh Review, No LXI. 6s. Records of the Circulation Club at Edin. Sermons on Interesting Subjects ; by the burgh ; by A. Duncan, sen. M.D. 8vo. Rev. Robert Balfour, D. D. minister of the 2s.6d.

Outer High Church, Glasgow, 8vo. es. The Encyclopædia Edinensis ; by James Notes on an Excursion in the Highlands Millar, M.D. Part V. of Vol. II.

of Scotland, in Autumn 1818; by John The Genius of Poetry; a poem in two Brown, minister of the associate congregabooks; by James Bowick, 8vo. 38. 6d. tion, Biggar. ls.

A Treatise on Spinning Machinery ; il. Lessons from the Bible, for the use of lustrated with Plans of Different Machines schools ; selected and edited by the Rev. made use of in that art ; by Andrew Gray, Thomas Duncan, minister of the New North author of the Ploughwright's Assistant, and Church, Dumfries, 18mo. 2s. Experienced Millwright. 18s. 6d.

Thoughts on Royalty ; a Sermon, sugMinutes of Meetings of Proprietors of gested by the lamented Death of her Ma. Shares in the Glasgow, Paisley, and Ardros. jesty the Queen : by John Keyden, A.M. san Canal; and Memorial and Opinions of preached in the church of Dúnbog, Fifea Counsel, with Excerpts from Minutes of shire, Nov. 29, 1818. 1s. the Committee of Management respecting A Father's Gift to his Children, being a Borrowed Money ; selected by a Committee, Short View of the Evidences of the Chrige and published at the request of the Pro- tian Religion, adapted to the Understand. prietors, 8vo. 58

ings of Young Persons ; by a Layman, Elegant Selections in Verse ; from the 24mo, third edition, with vignette and fronworks of Scott, Byron, Southey, and other tispiece. 2s. 6d. popular poets, chiefly of the present age ; by Poems and Songs, by the late Richard David Grant, 12mo. Is. 6d.

Gall, with a Memoir of the Author ; foolse Edinburgh Monthly Review, No II. cap 8vo. 7s. 6d. 28. 6d.

[ocr errors]

New French Works, imported by Treuttel and Wurtz, Soho-Square, London. Ginguené, Histoire Littéraire d'Italie, Vaudoncourt, Histoire de la guerre soutom 7, 8, et 9, (qui complettent l'ouvrage) tenue par les Français en Allemagne en 8vo. £1, 108.

1813, 4to. avec un 'Atlas Militaire de 12 Georgel, Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire cartes. £2, 4s. des événemens de la fin du XVIIIe. Siècle, Dupin, Essai historique sur les Services depuis 1760 jusqu'en 1806-1810, vol. 5 et et les Travaux scientifiques de Gaspard 6, (et dernier), 8vo. £1.

Monge, 8vo. 75. 6d. Segur, Galerie Morale and Politique, tom Une Année à Londres, par l'auteur de 2, 8vo. 10s.

Quinze jours, et de Six mois à Londres, Chaptal, de l'industrie Française, 2 vols 8vo. 7s.6d. 8vo. £1.

Geoffroy-Saint-Hilaire, Philosophie AnaBiographie des hommes Vivans, tom. 4 tomique. Des Organes respiratoires sous le et 5, (et dernier) 8vo. £1, 4s.

rapport de la détermination, and de l' id. Renouard, Catalogue de la Bibliothèque endité de leurs pièces osseusses, Svo, 10 d'un Amateur, 4 vols 8vo. £2, 16s. planches. 4to. 16s.

Petit-Radel, Recherches sur les biblio- Grimaud, Cours complet de Physiologie, thèques anciennes et modernes, et sur ouvrage posthume, publié par Lanthois, 9 les causes qui ont favorisé l'accroissement vols. 8vo. £i, Is. successif du nombre des livres, 8vo. 135. Granié, Histoire de Charlemagne, Roi de

De Pradt, Europe après le Congres d' France, and Empereur d'occident au renous Aix-la-Chapelle, 8vo. 10s.

vellement de l'empire, 8vo. 12s. Dictionnaire des Sciences Médicales, tom. Revue Encyclopedique, ou Analyse rais30, 31, 8vo. each 145.

onnéc des productiones

les plus remarquables Cailliot, Elemens de Pathologie Générale, dans la littérature, les Sciences et les Arts, and de Physiologie Pathologique, 2 vols. 8vo. No 1, Janvier 1819. L'abonnement Svo. £1.

pour l'année. £3, 12s.

MONTHLY REGISTER.

METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.

We stated, on a former occasion, our intention of making an addition to our monthly reports, of a new method of determining the hygrometric state of the atmosphere, more accurate, as well as more intelligible, than any that has yet been adopted. Our readers will find this addition in the following abstract, under the title of Relative Humidity, stated in degrees and tenths of a degree, complete dryness being denoted by 0, and complete moisture, or saturation, by 100. It is well known, that the indications of Leslie's hygrometer, taken by themselves, convey no clear or accurate idea either of the absolute or relative quantity of moisture in the atinosphere, except at the point of complete saturation. In that case, whatever be the temperature, the instrument stands at Zero, but as it rises indefinitely with an increase of temperature, or, in other words, because there is no number of degrees that denotes complete dryness, it is impossible to attach any distinct meaning to its indications. In consequence of Mr Anderson's discoveries in hygrometry, we are now enabled to remedy this inconvenience, by reducing Leslie's hygrometer to a definite scale, and exhibiting the quantity of moisture in the atmosphere in hundredths of what would be necessary to produce complete saturation. The point of saturation is denoted by 100, and the scale descends from that to 0, or complete dryness, as it seems more intelligible to say that the air contains such and such a quantity of moisture, than that it possesses a certain degree of dryness. Hence the expression, relative humidity. Besides this, our readers will likewise find in the abstract, the absolute quantity of moisture in 100 cubic inches of air, in decimals of a grain. This also is one of the results of Anderson's formula.

The month of January has been in many respects similar to the corresponding month of 1818. The mean temperature is about three-fourths of a degree higher, and the quantity of rain about half an inch greater. The weather was, upon the whole, open, but changeable and stormy, with high west winds. The barometer was often very unsteady, though the greatest fluctuation did not take place till some days after the highest wind. The mear daily range, as well as that of the thermometer, is nearly the same as last year.

METEOROLOGICAL Table, extracted from the Register kept on the Banks of the Tay, four miles east from Perth, Latitude 56° 25', Elevation 185 feet.

JANUARY 1819.

Extremes.

THERMOMETER.
Maximum, 14th day,
Minimum,

31st,
Lowest maximum, 31st,
Highest minimum, 4th,
Highest, 10 A. M. 11th,
Lowest ditto,

19th,
Highest, 10 P. M. 4th,
Lowest ditto

31st,
Greatest range in 24 hours, 14th,
Least ditto,

4th,

Degrees.

59.0
91.5
37,0
45.0
46.5
30.5
15.0

17.0
1.0

1

Means.

THERMOMETER. Degrees. Nean of greatest daily beat,

42.5 .... cold,

33.3 temprature, 10 A. M.

38.2 10 P. M.

36.8 ......... of daily extremes,

37.9 ............ 10 A. M. and P. M.

37.5 .... 4 daily observations,

37.7 Whole range of thermometer,

286.0 Mean daily ditto,

9.2 temperature of spring water,

41.1 BAROMETER.

Inches. Mean of 10 A. M. (temp. of mer, 44) 29.122 ............ 10 P. M. (temp. of mer. 44) 29.390 .... both, (temp. of mer, 14)

29.106 Whole range of barometer,

12.038 Mean ditto, during the day,

.191 night,

.197 ***.............. in 24 hours,

.388 HYGROMETER. Degrees Rain in inches,

3.379 Evaporation in ditto,

.975 Mean daily Evaporation,

.031 Leslie. Mean, 10 A. M.

68 .......... 10 P. M.

6.5 ...... both,

6.7 Anderson. Point of Dep. 10 A. M. ... 10 P. M.

32.7 both,

33.3 Relat. Humid. 10 A. M.

86.4 .... 10 P. M.

87.1 .... both,

86.6 .............. Grs. mois. in 100 cub. in air, 10 A.M. 146

..................... 10 P.M. .139

both, .142

BAROMETER.
Highest, 10 A. M.

1st,
Lowest ditto,

9th, Highest, 10 P. M.

1st, Lowest ditto,

25th, Greatest range in 24 hours, 16th, Least ditto,

30th,

Inches.
30.550
28.800
30.391

1.100
.asa

9th,

33.8

HYGROMETER. Degrees
Leslie. Highest, 10 A. M.

14.0
...... Lowest ditto,

29th, Highest, 10 P.M. 19th,

17.0 Lowest ditto, 25th,

0.0
Anderson. P. of Dep. Highest, 10 A.M. 5th, 14.6

Lowest ditto, 31st, 22.4
Highest, 10 P.M. 4th, 42.6

Lowest ditto, 31st, 2.4
...... Relat. Hum Greatest, 10 A.M. 29th, 100.0

La t ditto, 23d,
........ Greatest, IO P.M. 9th, 100.8

... Least ditto, 19th, 71.0
....... Mois. 100 cub. in Greatest 10 A.M. th, 904

"......... Least ditto, ölst, .097 *.***........................ Greatest, 10 P. M. 4th, .191 ....................... Least ditto, ölst, .097

METEOROLOGICAL TABLE, extracted from the Register kept at Edinburgh, in

the Observatory, Calton-hill.

N.B.--The Observations are made twice every day, at nine o'clock, forenoon, and four o'clock, afterThe second Observation in the afternoon, in the first column, is taken by the Register

Thermometer.

noon.

Attach.
Ther. Barom. Ther.

Wind.

1 ttach. Ther. Barom.

Ther.

Wind.

Mog4

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

28.655 M.42w.

Showery.

N. W. Cloudy, .450 M.31 cble. Ditto. 19{

A.263
A. 26

3{

11.35

M.303

{ 22{

{

S.W. Cloudy.

M.36

M.31

M. 30.209 M.39

Clear,

W.
A. .113 A. 41

frost.
M. .105 M.41 Clear,

s. W. *312

29.976 A. 43) mild.

.810 M. ills. w. Cloudy.
A. .836 A. 41 )
30.219 11.44

s. W.

Clear,
A. .200 A.43

sind high.
M.
1.42
29.747 M.46

Rain fore.
5

S. W
A. .920 A. 42

fair after.
.714 M. 5

s. w. Clear,
A. .558 A. 13 )

.287 M.40s. W. Showery.
7{
A. .309 A. 42)

.555 M.11 Calm. Clear, frost
A. .186A.34

28.726 M. 42s. W. Showery. A.

.751 A. 12 M.

29.218 M.42
38

IS. Ditto.
A. 28.668 A. 45
M. .840 M.43
*33

Stormy,
A.

29.129 A. 40 S
M.
12

.395 M.41 s. w. Clear.

.4301A.44 13{A:32

.338 M.42 N. w. Ditto.
.309 A, 40
28.907 M.43

N. W. Rainy.
29.351 A. 42
15
.265 M.41

N. W. Stormy,
.265 A. 37

rain & snow
29.672 M.3i|n. w. Clear.
A. .540' A. 10)

Jan. 17{
A.

.654 A. 41
M.
18{

.957 M.41
A. 322 29.383 A.371
M.

158 A. 37 )
M.
20
20{

.123 M.40

Cble. Ditto, frost. .107A. 36 ) M. 21

28.916 M.36 Cloudy. A. 28 29.102 A. 35 )

snow. M.

28.789 M.35
A. 28

.728 A. 36)
M.
23

.922 M.38
A. 32 29.128 A, 36

S.W. Ditto.
M. .269 M.35
A.

Chle. Do. sleet aft.
M.
25
.87 M.38

Ditto, rain, A. 32

S.W. .871 A. 3€

& sleet aft. M. 26

28.871 M.38 A.31 29.172 A.38

E. Ditto. .368 M.37

E.

Cloudy, 404 A. 39

rain altern.
M.
28

.391 M.37
A. 32
.337 A. 30

E. Rain & sleet
.240 M.39
.241 A.36

S. E. Clear, mild. IM. .261 M.36 .382 A.35

Cble. Cloudy. (M. .314 M.33

1 .162 A. 41

N.W. Clear frost. Average of rain 3.5 inches.

102

11.

[blocks in formation]

4.32

14{

[blocks in formation]

A.

M.34
M.34
M.28

A

311 4.27

16

COMMERCIAL REPORT.-15th February 1819.

per cwt.

Sugar. The price of this article of trade is various and unsettled. The market is very heavy, and the sales limited. The buyers in general keep back in expectation of the prices becoming lower ; but as the stock is greatly reduced, and it is certain no supply of any consequence can reach this country for some months, there is a greater probability of a rise than a fall on this article. A hurricane in Jamaica in November (a most unusual time) has greatly injured the crop of 1819, as the Canes, on which the dependence is chiefly placed, are then come to nearly full growth, and are therefore more easily torn out of roots, broken and destroyed. The price of Sugar may be stated to have declined ls.

In Foreign there is nothing doing. Considerable purchases have been made in Lumps, but still there is no variation of price. Molasses are heavy and declining.Cotton. The market continues very heavy, and for Bengals, in particular, greatly depressed. In London it is chiefly of this description which is to be found at market. At Liverpool there has lately been some appearance of revival in the Cotton market, but it is not likely to be to any great extent. The great stock on hand, the large quantities continuing to be imported, and the great fall in the markets whence this article is produced, must tend to prevent any considerable rise, at least for a considerable time. The imports last month were 60,063 bags and bales, which, if it continued at the same rate during the 12 months, would give 60,000 packages more than last year. The importations at this time also are not on the highest scale. Coffee. This article fluctuates greatly, so much so, that it is impossible to give any correct idea of the state of the market. The quotations are merely nominal : Yet there is little doubt but that Coffee will continue to bear a good price, and be in regular, if not in very extensive demand.---Tobacco. The demand for

this article is reviving. Some sales have been made for home consumpt. The buyers believe that it has touched the lowest point of depression. Therefore inquiry is revived, and as the exports to the Continent have been considerable, the holders are sanguine of higher prices. Of the other articles of commerce our details may be short, as there is little interesting concerning the markets for any of them. In Tallow there has been considerable transactions, but the prices are giving way. Hemp is sold under our quotations, and in Flax there is little doing. Oils are quoted lower, and sales heavy. The Grain market is dull. In Fruit there is no alteration. Beef, if good, is in demand. The sales of Bacon are heavy. Butters are in limited request, and a further decline anticipated. In Rum there is little doing, nor any variation in price. The price of Brandy is unsettled, and the sale of Geneva languid, as the importations of these articles are very considerable.

In our last Report, we took a general review of British commerce, and the countries to which it was daily extending. We omitted to notice a trade to the Red Sea, which we are happy to perceive is entering upon by British capital and skill. Mocha is the chief port at present where this trade is carried on, but there is not a doubt but that it will soon extend with increasing energy to all the ports in that famed sea, both on its Arabian and its Abyssinian shores, and also along the eastern shores of Africa, to the southward of these coun. tries. During the war, the Americans carried on an extensive and lucrative trade with these places, by means of having the Isles of France for their rendezvous. This trade se may now fairly anticipate is gone into hands whose industry and honour will rapidly dif. fuse through these distant and once more interesting regions the blessings of knowledge, civilization, and peace.

Since our last publication, we are happy to see, that our accounts of the extensive trade and flourishing revenues of our country, are borne out by the highest authority. By the statement of Lord Castlcreagh, in the House of Commons, on the 9th instant, we learn that the actual increase of the revenue for last year, was £5,328,000 ; while the expenditure was considerably less than what had been anticipated. Thus the great point is clearly and firmly established, that the income of the country exceeds its expenditure for last year about £3,500,000, with every appearance of a progressive improvement for the year now running. From the same authority, we also learn that the exports of this country for the year ending the 5th October last, of articles of British produce and manufactures, calculated at the official value, or value as entered at the Custom-house, amounted to £35,325,000, about £100,000 more than in 1815, the year when they exceeded all the previous years, by £10,000,000. The excess beyond 1817 is £3,325,000. But our readers must bear in mind, that this is by no means the real value ; it is greatly more ;- this is only the manufacturer's and exporter's price, namely, what they cost them at the ready money price. To this we must add their profits, and all expenses of commission, freight, insurance, &c. which are all profits to the British nation, and certainly as much part of our trade as these articles themselves. Taking these together, at 25 per cent. we have the enormous sum of £14,156,250, as the actual value of the exports of British produce and manufactures for one year. When to all this we add the exports of articles of foreign produce, of which our readers may form some idea by turning to our last Commercial Report, where many of these exports are very minutely given, and where they think on the vast internal trade of this country. When they reflect upon the amazing extent of our imports, (the produce from our West India colonies, and cotion, from all quarters of the world, being equal to £32,000,000 alone) they may then form an idea of the prodigious trade and stupendous mercantile interests and establishments of this wonderful country. It exhibits to the view of the inquirer, a picture of human skill, ingenuity, capital, and industry, such as never were put in motion and activity in any age of the world, and such as can hardly ever be surpassed in any succeeding age. It strikes faction dumb, malevolence mute, and our boldest enemies with terror and dismay.

Bright and brilliant as is the picture here exhibited, let no one imagine that the commercial sky is to remain for ever unclouded, and never be visited with a storm. This must be the reverse. It is approaching with rapid strides. A time of commercial pressure and difficulty is marching hard after many, and will soon overtake individuals. This arises from four great causes, all directed to the same point. The first is the drain of money for foreign loans, and purchases in foreign funds; the second is immense commercial spa culations ; the third springs from the general and indiscriminate system of our manufacturers, of consigning goods to every market, without being possessed of that knowledge which would have enabled them to judge what was best suited to each ; the fourth and last cause is, the great loss on cotton-wool imported into this country last year. This cannot be less than £3,000,000, two thirds of which is perhaps confined to Manchester and Liverpool. The first cause may now be considered as nearly removed ; the second arose from the great facility with which money was obtained, and which has induced many to go to a great extent in every market, to endeavour to retrieve the immense losses sustained by various causes in the disastrous year 1816. But still the evil consequences of all this will be partial, temporary, and, in comparison to the whole, of small extent. Compared to our whole trade, it is like the storm on the ocean, which shatters a few ships in a corner, while prosperous gales bear the great proportion on their way. It is the thunder storm of

the torrid climate which passes ina moment, and leaves e purer atmosphere and more en. livening sky. It can no more injure our general strength, wealth, and prosperity, than the shaking a few acorns from the lofty oak would impair its grandeur or injure its strength.

Errata for last Commercial Report.
For Rum paid duties, 1816, read 1818.
For American timber, provisions, and stones, read timber, provisions, and staves.
In page 498, line 42, for American powers, read European powers.

[ocr errors]

per Ib.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

F.S.

[ocr errors]

PRICES CURRENT.-Jan 30.-London, Feb. 5, 1819.
SUGAR, Musc.
LEITH. GLASGOW. LIVERPOOL LONDON.

DUTIES.
B. P. Dry Brown, cwt. 76 to

74 to 78
64 to

75 to 77 Mid, good, and fine mid. 80 90 79

87 77 91 79

85

£1 10 0 Fine and very fine,

92
96 91
94 92
95 84

90 Refined, Doub. Loaves, 150 160

135 153 Powder ditto, 120 126

107 112
Single ditto,
116 122 119

124 120
122 111

118
Small Lumps
112 116 114 116 120

124 110
Large ditto,
108 111 110

112 106
114 108

110 Crushed Lumps,

62
66 66
67

68
MOLASSES, British, cwt. 38
37 38 37 38 34 6 35

0 7 64 COFFEE, Jamaica cwt. Ord. good, and fine ord. 130 141 128 139 134

144 135 140 Mid. good, and fine mid. 147 154 145

152 145 152 142 158 Dutch, Triage and very ord. (120 150

105 136 115 138
130
Ord. good, and fine ord.

143 128
111 138
146 138

10 78

150 Mid. good, and fine mid. 147 149 145 147 147 152 113 149 St Domingo, 140

138 143 145 154 PIMENTO (in Bond)

9

85 94

0 0 9 SPIRITS, Jam. Rum, 16 0. P. gall. 35 10d 4s 0d 3s 8d 3s 100 3s 8d 4s Od 35 40 55 00

08 11 Brandy, 5 6 60

49 5 6/B.S.

0 17 0 Geneva, 3 10 4 0

3 6
38 ||F.S.

0 17 112 Aqua, 7 8 7 11

15 6 WINES,

B.S. 2143 18 0 Claret, 1st Growths, bhd. 60 64

£35 65 0

(F.S.) 148 4 6 Portugal Red, pipe. 48 54

50 58 0

B.S. butt. 34

O Spanish White,

55

30

95 11

65 0 pipe. 30 Tenerifle,

35

25

98 16 0

38 0 60 Madeira, 70

96 13 0 58

(F.S.) 99 16 6 LOGWOOD, Jam,

ton. £10
7 10 7 15 8 0

8 5 7 15 8 0
10 10
Honduras,

0
7 15 8
8 10 8 15 8 0 8 5

0915 Campeachy,

11

90 9 10 90 9 5, 9 10 FUSTIC, Jamaica,

11

10 15 11 011 11 12 0 Cuba,

1 4 63 12 10 13

13 5 14 0 14 10 INDIGO, Caraccas fine, ib. 98 6d Ils 6a 8 6 96

9s Od 11 6

0 0 43 TIMBER, Amer. Pine, foot. 23 2 6

5 2 6

0 Ditto Oak, 4 6 5 0

5 Christiansand (dut. paid) 1 2 3 24 Honduras Mahogany 1 4 1 8 0 10 18

1 6 1 5 1 6

3 16 0 1 2 3 0 1 St Domingo, ditto

r 6
2 0
1 10

2 8 14

1 1 45 brl. TAR, American,

B.S. 16 0 166 19 6

(F.S. Archangel,

22
23
19 6 21 0 23

6

(B.S.) cwt. 10 PITCH, Foreign,

12 0 12 6

(F.S.) 10 1 TALLOW, Rus. Yel. Cand. 75 76

76 75
70 0

0 3 2 Home Melted,

77 HEMP, Riga Rhine,

ton. 53
34
52
£51 0

0917 Petersburgh Clean, 47

48 49
50
16 44 10

(F.S.

0 10 02 FLAX, Riga Thies. & Druj. Rak. 82

84

86 0

0

0 4

B.S. 60 Dutch, 140

70 90

0 0 F.S.

748 66 Irish, 75

1 3 9

(B.S. 109. 90 MATS, Archangel,

95

£4 5 4 10

F.S. 14 11: BRISTLES,

B.S. 0 3 63 Petersburgh Firsts, cwt. 15 0 16 0

14 10

F.s. 0 3 115

0 4 63 ASHES, Peters. Pearl, 48

51

19
F.S.

06 Montreal ditto,

58
60 58
60 57
60

0 1 7
53
54 52
53 52

53 50 OIL, Whale,

tun. 38

38
40 40

32
Cod.

80 (p. brl.) 40

42 38

38 TOBACCO, Virgin. fine, Ib. 11 12 12+ 13 08 0 10 Is id Middling 10 104 11 113 0 5 0 78 1 04 1

0 10 Inferior,

9
10 10

11 05 COTTONS, Bowed Georg.

1 53 1 7 1 3 1 5 1 4 1 6 Sea Island, fine,

3 6 3 8 29 3 0 2 0 3 Good,

2 11

4 26 28 1 5 1 8
Middling,

9 2 11 1 8
15 1 7 B.S. 0 8 7

? Demerara and Berbice,

8 2 0

1 10 1 7 1 10 F.s. West India,

5 19 4 1 6 1 4 1 6 Pernambuco,

0 2 0 9 1 10 1 9 1 101 Maranham,

1 9

7 1 83 1 7 1 Vol. IV.

4 L

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

50c.f. ton. per 12 brls.

.

2 112

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]

7413

[ocr errors]

B.S.

Pot,

[ocr errors]

}

per 100 lbs.

1 10

« AnteriorContinuar »