The mystery of murder, and its defence [first appeared in the Law review for March 1850] Modern state trials. The martyr patriots. Speculators among the stars. A few personal recollections of Christopher North

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1855
 

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Página 133 - ... to establish a defence on the ground of insanity, it must be clearly proved, that, at the time of the committing of the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing, or, if he did know it, that he did not know he was doing what was wrong.
Página 399 - I have made the earth, and created man upon it: I, even my hands, have stretched out the heavens, and all their host have I commanded.
Página 120 - Can a medical man, conversant with the disease of insanity, who never saw the prisoner previously to the trial, but who was present during the whole trial and the examination of all the witnesses, be asked his opinion as to the state of the prisoner's mind at the time of the commission of the alleged crime, or his opinion whether the prisoner was conscious, at the time of doing the act, that he was acting contrary to law, or whether he was laboring under any and what delusion at the time?
Página 119 - ... at the time of the committing of the act, the party accused was labouring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing; or if he did know it, that he did not know that he was doing what was wrong.
Página 399 - Thus saith God the Lord, He that created the heavens, and stretched them out ; He that spread forth the earth, and that which cometh out of it ; He that giveth breath unto the people upon it, And spirit to them that walk therein...
Página 120 - If the accused was conscious that the act was one which he ought not to do, and if that act was at the same time contrary to the law of the land, he is punishable -, and the usual course therefore has been to leave the question to the jury, whether the party accused had a sufficient degree of reason to know that he was doing an act that was wrong ; and this course we think is correct, accompanied with such observations and explanations as 152 THE CRIMINAL INTENT. 1 58. the circumstances of each particular...
Página 483 - For since the beginning of the world men have not heard, nor perceived by the ear, neither hath the eye seen, O God, beside thee, what he hath prepared for him that waiteth for him.
Página 119 - In what terms ought the question to be left to the jury, as to the prisoner's state of mind at the time when the act was committed?" ANSWERS. — " The jury ought to be told, in all cases, that every man is presumed to be sane, and to possess a sufficient degree of reason to be responsible for his crimes, until the contrary be proved to their satisfaction...
Página 112 - Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me; for I am desolate and afflicted.
Página 286 - That every labouring sinew strains. Those in the deeper vitals rage : Lo Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. To each his sufferings : all are men, Condemn'd alike to groan ; The tender for another's pain, Th

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