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MONTHLY REGISTER.

METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.

We stated, on a former occasion, our intention of making an addition to our monthly reports, of a new method of determining the hygrometric state of the atmosphere, more ac. curate, as well as more intelligible, than any that has yet been adopted. Our readers will find this addition in the following abstract, under the title of Relative Humidity, stated in degrees and tenths of a degree, complete dryness being denoted by 0, and complete moisture, or saturation, by 100. It is well known, that the indications of Leslie's hygrometer, taken by themselves, convey no clear or accurate idea either of the absolute or relative quantity of moisture in the atmosphere, except at the point of complete saturation. In that case, whatever be the temperature, the instrument stands at Zero, but as it rises inde. finitely with an increase of temperature, or, in other words, because there is no number of degrees that denotes complete dryness, it is impossible to attach any distinct meaning to its indications. In consequence of Mr Anderson's discoveries in hygrometry, we are now enabled to remedy this inconvenience, by reducing Leslie's hygrometer to a definite scale, and exhibiting the quantity of moisture in the atmosphere in hundredths of what would be necessary to produce complete saturation. The point of saturation is denoted by 100, and the scale descends from that to 0, or complete dryness, as it seems more intelligible to say that the air contains such and such a quantity of moisture, than that it possesses a certain degree of dryness. Hence the expression, relative humidity. Besides this, our readers will likewise find in the abstract, the absolute quantity of moisture in 100 cubic inches of air, in decimals of a grain. This also is one of the results of Anderson's formula.

The month of January has been in many respects similar to the correspondiug month of 1818. The mean temperature is about three-fourths of a degree higher, and the quantity of rain about half an inch greater. The weather was, upon the whole, open, but changeable and stormy, with high west winds. The barometer was often very unsteady, though the greatest fluctuation did not take place till some days after the highest wind. The mean claily range, as well as that of the thermometer, is nearly the same as last year.

METEOROLOGICAL Table, extracted from the Register kept on the Banks of

the Tay, four miles east from Perth, Latitude 56° 25', Elevation 185 feet.

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BAROMETER.

Inches. Mean of 10 A. M. temp. of mer. 44) 29.422 .......... 10 P. M. (temp. of mer. 44) 29.390 ... both, (temp. of mer, 44)

29.406 Whole range of barometer,

12.038 Mean ditto, during the day,

.191 ...... night,

.197 ................. in 24 hours,

.388 HYGROMETER. Degrees. Rain in inches,

3.372 Evaporation in ditto,

.975 Mean daily Evaporation,

.031 Leslie. vean, 10 A. M.

68 ...................... 10 P. M. both,

6.7 Anderson. Point of Dep. 10 A. M.

33.8 10 P. M.

32.7 both,

33.3 Relat. Humid. 10 A. M.

86.4 10 P. M.

87.1 both,

86.6 ............... Grs, mois. in 100 cub. in air, 10 A.M..146

................. 10 P.M. .139 .................................................... both, .142

BAROMETER.

Inches. Highest, 10 A. M.

1st,

30.360 Lowest ditto,

9th,

28.860 Highest, 10 P. M.

1st,

30.324 Lowest ditto,

25th,

28.690 Greatest range in 24 hours, 16th,

1.100 Least ditto,

30th,

.050 HYGROMETER.

Degrees. Leslie. Highest, 10 A. M. 9th,

11.0 Lowest ditto, 29th,

0.0 Highest, 10 Þ.M.

12th,

17.0 Lowest ditto, 25th,

0.0 Anderson. P. of Dep. Highest, 10 A M. 5th, 44.6 .............................. Lowest ditto, 31st, 22.4

Highest, 10 P.M. 4th, 42.6 ............ Lowest ditto,

31st, Relat. Hum. Greatest, 10 A.M. 29th, 100.0 ................. Least ditto, 23d, 72.6 .......... Greatest, 10 P.M. 25th, 100.0

Least ditto, 12th, 74.0 ...... Mois. 100 cub. in Greatest 10 A.M. 5th, 204

.............. Least ditto, 31st, 2097 ............................ Greatest, 10 P. M. 4th, .191 ****...................... Least ditto, 31st, .097

6.5

92.4

Jan. 1{A.

1.347

Jan. 17{M.

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3 M.35

METEOROLOGICAL TABLE, extracted from the Register kept at Edinburgh, in

the Observatory, Calton-hill. N.B.--The Observations are made twice every day, at nine o'clock, forenoon, and four o'clock, afternoon. The second Observation in the afternoon, in the first column, is taken by the Register

Thermometer.
Attach.

1. Itach.
Ther. Barom. Ther. Wind.

Ther. Barom.

Ther.

Wind.
M.
30.209 M.39

W.

Clear, .123 A. 41

28.655 M.42
frost.

1:34
.654 A. 41

Showery .105 M.44

Clear,
2{A:317 29.976 A, 43}
S. W.

18

.957 M.41 mild.

A. 324 29.383 A. 371 .840 M.41 s. w. Cloudy.

M.

19
.886 A. 41 )

.158 A. 37)
30.219 M.44 Is. W.
Clear,

M.
A.

20
.209 A. 43
wind high.

A. 267

.107 A. 36)
129.747 M.46 s. w.
Rain fore.

M. 5

28.916 M.36 Cloudy,

21
A. .920/A. 42

fair after.
A. 28 29.102 A.35

snow.
.714 M. 45
S. W. Clear,

22

M.
A. .558 A, 43)

(A. 28

.728 A. 36
.287 M.44
s. W. Showery.

M.
23
.922 M.38

s.W. Ditto.
A. .309 A. 42

A. 32 29.128 A. 36 S .555 M.41

Calm. Clear, frost 8{A.

.269 M.35 .186 A.34

Cble. Do. sleet art. 28.726 M.42 s. W. Showery. 25

.871 M.38

S.W. Ditto, rain,
A. .754 A. 42

A. 32
.871 A. 36

& sleet aft. 29.218 M.42

S. 38

Ditto.

M. 28.871 M.38
A.

E.
128.668 A. 45

26 A.31 29.172 A. 38

Ditto.
.840 M.43

N. W.
Stormy,

(M.

.368 M.37
29.129 A. 40 }
A.
rain & snow

YE.

Cloudy, .404 A. 39

rain aftern. .395 M.41 S. W. Clear.

M. 28

.391 M.37 A. .430 A. 445

A. 32

E. .337 A. 3

Rain & sleet, M. .338 M.42

32 13{ N. W. Ditto.

M. 29

.240 M.39 A. .309 A. 40 S

A. 314 241 A. 36

S. E. Clear, mild. 28.907 M.43) N. W. Rainy.

M. 34

.261 M.36 29.354 A. 42)

Cble. Cloudy.

.382 A. 38
.265 M.41
151

N. W.
Stormy,

.344 M.33
A.
.265 A. 37 S rain & snow

.162 A. 41}

N.W. Clear frost 129.672 M.301

N. W. Clear.
A
.540)A, 40

Average of rain 3.5 inches.

N. W. Cloudy, .450 M.3i |cule. Ditto. .128 M.40 Cble. Ditto, frost.

A. 26

M.35
M.42
M.301
M.36

6

28.789 M.3. S.W. Cloudy.

M.31

M.
24 A. 294.871 A. 36

M.293

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M.33
M.32

27{'A.317

12{

14{

M.
A.

M.34

M.
31A.27

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COMMERCIAL REPORT.-15th February 1819.

Sugar. The price of this article of trade is various and unsettled. The market is very heavy, and the sales limited. The buyers in general keep back in expectation of the prices becoming lower ; but as the stock is greatly reduced, and it is certain no supply of any consequence can reach this country for some months, there is a greater probability of å rise than a fall on this article. A hurricane in Ja November (a most unusual time) has greatly injured the crop of 1819, as the Canes, on which the dependence is chiefly placed, are then come to nearly full growth, and are therefore more easily torn out of roots, broken and destroyed. The price of Sugar may be stated to have declined 1s. per cwt.

In Foreign there is nothing doing. Considerable purchases have been made in Lumps, but still there is no variation of price. Molasses are heavy and declining. Cotton. The market continues very heavy, and for Bengals, in particular, greatly depressed. In London it is chiefly of this description which is to be found at market. Liverpool there has lately been some appearance of revival in the Cotton market, but it is not likely to be to any great extent. The great stock on hand, the large quantities continuing to be imported, and the great fall in the markets whence this article is produced, must tend to prevent any considerable rise, at least for a considerable time. The imports last month were 60,063 bags and bales, which, if it continued at the same rate during the 12 months, would give 60,000 packages more than last year. The importations at this time also are not on the highest scale. -Coffee.' This article fluctuates greatly, so much so, that it is impossible to give any correct idea of the state of the market

. The quotations are merely nominal : Yet there is little doubt but that Coffee will continue to bear a good price, and be in regular, if not in very extensive demand...Tobacco. The demand for

At

this article is reviving. Some sales have been made for home consumpt. The buyers believe that it has touched the lowest point of depression. Therefore inquiry is revived, and as the exports to the Continent have been considerable, the holders are sanguine of higher prices. Of the other articles of commerce our details may be short, as there is little in. teresting concerning the markets for any of them. In Tallow there has been considerable transactions, but the prices are giving way. Hemp is sold under our quotations, and in Flax there is little doing. Oils are quoted lower, and sales heavy. The Grain market is dull. In Fruit there is no alteration. Beef, if good, is in demand. The sales of Bacon are heavy. Butters are in limited request, and a further decline anticipated. In Rum there is little doing, nor any variation in price. The price of Brandy is unsettled, and the sale of Geneva languid, as the importations of these articles are very considerable.

In our last Report, we took a general review of British commerce, and the countries to which it was daily extending. We omitted to notice a trade to the Red Sea, which we are happy to perceive is entering upon by British capital and skill. Mocha is the chief port at present where this trade is carried on, but there is not a doubt but that it will soon extend with increasing energy to all the ports in that famed sea, both on its Arabian and its Abyssinian shores, and also along the eastern shores of Africa, to the southward of these countries. During the war, the Americans carried on an extensive and lucrative trade with these places, by means of having the Isles of France for their rendezvous. This trade we may now fairly anticipate is gone into hands whose industry and honour will rapidly diffuse through these distant and once more interesting regions the blessings of knowledge, civilization, and peace.

Since our last publication, we are happy to see, that our accounts of the extensive trade and flourishing revenues of our country, are borne out by the highest authority. By the statement of Lord Castlereagh, in the House of Commons, on the 9th instant, we learn that the actual increase of the revenue for last year, was £5,328,000 ; while the expenditure was considerably less than what had been anticipated. Thus the great point is clearly and firmly established, that the income of the country exceeds its expenditure for last year about £3,500,000, with every appearance of a progressive improvement for the year now running. From the same authority, we also learn that the exports of this country for the year ending the 5th October last, of articles of British produce and manufactures, calcu. lated at the official value, or value as entered at the Custom-house, amounted to £35,325,000, about £100,000 more than in 1815, the year when they exceeded all the previous years, by £10,000,000. The excess beyond 1817 is £3,325,000. But our readers must bear in mind, that this is by no means the real value ; it is greatly more ;-this is only the manufacturer's and exporter's price, namely, what they cost them at the ready money price. To this we must add their profits, and all expenses of commission, freight, insurance, &c. which are all profits to the British nation, and certainly as much part of our trade as these articles themselves. Taking these together, at 25 per cent. we have the enormous sum of £44,156,250, as the actual value of the exports of British produce and manufactures for one year. When to all this we add the exports of articles of foreign produce, of which our readers may form some idea by turning to our last Commercial Report, where many of these exports are very minutely given, and where they think on the vast internal trade of this country. When they reflect upon the amazing extent of our imports, (the produce from our West India colonies, and cotton, from all quarters of the world, being equal to £32,000,000 alone) they may then form an idea of the prodigious trade and stupendous mercantile interests and establishments of this wonderful country. It exhibits to the view of the inquirer, a picture of human skill, ingenuity, capital, and industry, such as never were put in motion and activity in any age of the world, and such as can hardly ever be surpassed in any succeeding age. It strikes faction dumb, malevolence mute, and our boldest enemies with terror

and dismay. Bright and brilliant as is the picture here exhibited, let no one imagine that the commercial sky is to remain for -ever unclouded, and never be visited with a storm. This must be the reverse. It is approaching with rapid strides. A time of commercial pressure and difficulty is marching hard after many, and will soon overtake individuals. This arises from four great causes, all directed to the same point. The first is the drain of money for foreign loans, and purchases in foreign funds ; the second is immense commercial spe. culations ; the third springs from the general and indiscriminate system of our manufacturers, of consigning goods to every market, without being possessed of that knowledge which would have enabled them to judge what was best suited to each ; the fourth and last cause is, the great loss on cotton-wool imported into this country last year. This cannot be less than £3,000,000, two thirds of which is perhaps confined to Manchester and Liverpool. The first cause may now be considered as nearly removed ; the second arose from the great facility with which money was obtained, and which has induced many to go to a great extent in every market, to endeavour to retrieve the immense losses sustained by various causes in the disastrous year 1816. But still the evil consequences of all this will be partial, temporary, and, in comparison to the whole, of small extent. Compared to our whole trade, it is like the storm on the ocean, which shatters a few ships in a corner, while prosperous gales bear the great proportion on their way. It is the thunder storm of

the torrid climate which passes ina moment, and leaves a purer atmosphere and more en. livening sky. It can no more injure our general strength, wealth, and prosperity, than the shaking a few acorns from the lofty oak would impair its grandeur or injure its strength.

Errata for last Commercial Report
For Rum paid duties, 1816, read 1818.
For American timber, provisions, and stones, read timber, provisions, and staves.
In page 498, line 42, for American powers, read European powers.

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96

per lb.

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PRICES CURRENT.-Jan 30.m-London, Feb. 5, 1819.
SUGAR, Musc.
LEITH. GLASGOW. \LIVERPOOL. LONDON.

DUTIES. B. P. Dry Brown, cwt. 76 to

74 to 78

64 to

76

75 to 77 Mid. good, and fine mid. 80

79

91 79
85

£1 10 0 Fine and very fine,

92

91
94 92
95 84

90 Refined, Doub. Loaves, 150

160

135

153 Powder ditto, 120 126

107 112 Single ditto, 116 122 119 124 120

122 ili 118 Small Lumps 112 116 114 116 120

124 1110 Large ditto, 108 111 110

112 105

114 108 110 Crushed Lumps,

62
66 66
67 65

68 MOLASSES, British, cwt. 38

37 38
37 38 34 6 35

0 7 64 COFFEE, Jamaica cwt. Ord. good, and fine ord. 130 141 128

139 134

144 135 140 Mid. good, and fine mid. 147 154 1145 152 145 152 142 158 Dutch, Triage and very ord. 120 130

105 136 115 138 Ord. good, and fine ord. 130 143 (128

141 138 146 138 150

0 0 78 Mid. good, and fine mid. 147 149 145

147 147 152 113 149 St Domingo, 140

138 143 145 154 PIMENTO (in Bond) Ib. 93

93 9
84 93

0 097 SPIRITS, Jam. Rum, 16 0. P. gall.) 38 10d. 45. Od 3s 8d 3s 10d 3s 8d 4s Od 3s 4d 5s Od

0813 Brandy, 5 6 6 0

4 9 5 6 B.S. 0 17 0921 Geneva, 3 10 4 0

3 6

0 17 1142) Aqua, 7 8 7 11

15 6 WINES,

B.S. 1 2 143 18 0 Claret, 1st Growths, hhd. 60 64

£35 65 O F.S.) F148 4

6 Portugal Red, pipe. 48 54

50 58 0 Spanish White, butt. 34 55

(B.S.195 11 30

0

65 0 Teneriffe, pipe. 30 35

25 38 0 (F.$.

98 16 0 Madeira, 60 70

58
63 0 SB.S.

96 13 0

(F.S.) 99 16 6 LOGWOOD, Jam. ton. £10

9 10 7 15 8 0 8 5 7 15 8 0 Honduras,

10 10
7 15 8 0 8 10 8 15 8 0 8 5

0 9 13 Campeachy,

11

90 9 10 90 9 5 9 10 FUSTIC, Jamaica, 11

10 15 11 011 11 12 0 Cuba, 13 12 10 13 5 14 0 14 10

1 4 6 INDIGO, Caraccas fine, Ib. 9s 6d lls 60 8 6 96

9s Od 11 6

0 0 TIMBER, Amer. Pine, foot. 2 3 2 6

2 5 26

2 Ditto Oak,

4 6 5 0 Christiansand (dut. paid) 1 2 3

5 67 Honduras Mahogany 14 1:8 10 1 8 1 23

1 6 1 5 1 6

3 16 0 St Domingo, ditto 1 2 3 0 1 2 0 1 6 1 10

8 14 2 TAR, American, brl.

16 0 16 6 19 6

B.S. 1 1 45

1 2 114 Archangel,

23

19 6 21 0 23 PITCH, Foreign, ewt. 10

12 0 12 6

B.S.

(F.S.) 10 1 TALLOW, Rus. Yel. Cand. 75 76 75 76 75

70 0

0.3 2 Home Melted,

77 HEMP, Riga'Rhine, ton.) 53

54 50
52
£51 0

B.S. 0 9 14 Petersburgh Clean, 47

18 49
50
46 44 10

(F.S.

0 10 03 FLAX, Riga Thies. & Druj. Rak. 82 84

86 0
Dutch,
60 140

70
90

0 0 421 Irish,

66

75 MATS, Archangel, 109.90

95

£4 5

1 3 9 BS. 4 10

F.S. 1 4 114 BRISTLES,

B.S. 0 3 63 Petersburgh Firsts, cwt. 15 0

14 10

F.S. 0.3 113 ASHES, Peters. Pearl, 18

0 B.S.

4 65 51

49
FS.

6 Montreal ditto,

58
60 58
60 57

60
Pot,

53
51 52
53 52
53

0 1 7

50 OIL, Whale,

tun, 38

38
10 40

32

33 Cod,

80 (p. brl.) 40

42 38

38

40 TOBACCO, Virgin. fine, Ib. 11 12 124 13 08 0 10 Is id 1 Middling,

10
103 11
113 0 54 0 731 01 1

10 Inferior,

9
10 10

114 0 5 COTTONS, Bowed Georg.

1 52 173 1

5 1

1 Sea Island, fine,

3 6 3 8 2

2 0 3 0 Good,

2 11

8 5 118 Middling,

29 2 11

2 2 5 1 7 B.S. Demerara and Berbice,

1 8 2 0

1 10 1 7 1 10 F.S. West India,

5

9 1 4 1 6 1 4 1 6 Pernambuco,

0 2 0 19 3 10 1 9 1 103 Maranham,

9 10 7 i 821 17 1 83 VOL. IV.

4 L

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50c. f. ton. per 12 brls.

22

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Weekly Price of Stocks, from 20 to 23d January 1819.

2d.

9th. 16th.

23d.

80 pr.

16 18 pr.

79

19 20 pr.

19 20 pr.

87 89 pr. 18 20 pr.

Bank stock,
3 per cent. reduced,

783 78
78

785 795 ? 3 per cent. consols

774 781 79 785 4 per cent. consols,amman

954 I 95

963 97 973 981 5 per cent, navy ann..ama

1054 106

106 s 1071 Imperial 3 per cent. ann. India stock,

2314 bonds, una

92 93 pr. 86 87 pr. Exchequer bills, 2d, p.d... Consols for acc. com

79

79 79 American 3 per cent man

67 f. 90 c. new loan, 6 p. Gorana French 5 per cents. camara

Course of Exchange, February 2.-Amsterdam, 11: 6:2 U. Antwerp, 11:9. Ex. Hamburgh, 33 :7: 21 U. Frankfort, 1 : 10 Ex. Paris, 23 : 80 : 2 U. Bourdeaux, 23: 80. Madrid, 40% effect. Cadiz, 40} effect. Gibraltar, 34, Leghorn, 52. Genoa, 47. Malta, 50. Naples, 42. Palermo, 127 per oz. Oporto, 58. Rio Janeiro, 65. *Dublin, 10. Cork, 101. Agio of the Bank of Holland, 2.

Prices of Gold and Silver, per oz.- Portugal gold, in coin, £0:0:0. Foreign gold, in bars, £0:0:0. New doubloons, £0:0:0. New dollars, 5s. 9d. Silver, in bars, 5s. 7d.

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London, Corn Exchange, Feb. 1.

Liverpool, Feb. 1.
S.
s. Wheat,

3. d. 3. d. Wheat, Red 57 to 62 White Pease

Rice, p.owt. 0 0 to 0 0 Fine 73 to 79 Boilers

} 52 to 56 English 11 0 to 12 o Flour, English, Superfine

- Fine.

63 to
Scotch

. 10 0 to 12 o p. 280lb.fine63 0 to 65 0 Foreign

-Tick.

42 to 55 Welch ...11 0 to 12 0 Seconds. 56 0 to 60 0 English Wheat, 57 62 Small Beans. 65 to 72 Irish ... 11 3 to 12 9 Irishp:240lb. 52 0 to 54 0 Fine 82 Fine.

New.

to - Ameri. p. bl. 44 0 to 47 0 Superfine - to -Feed Oats . . .28 to 31| Dantzie • 11 6 to 12 6 --Sour do. . 34 0 to 38 0 New - to -Fine

32 to 34 Wismar . . 11 6 to 12 0 Clover-seed, p. bush. Rye 40 to Poland do . 32 to 34|American . 11 0 to 12 0 - White

O to Fine 42 to 50 Fine 36 to 58 | Quebec ...96 to 10 3 Red

o to Barley 42 to 50 Potato do... 58 to 40 Barley, per 60 libs. Oatmeal, per 240 lb. Fine 60 to 64 Fine

- to English, grind.6 6 to 6 9 English 40 0 to 43 O New ... 68 to 71 Fine Flour, . 60 to 65 Malting. ..9 0 to 10 6 Sooteh... 33 0 to 35 0 Malt, 84 to 90 Seconds . 55 to 60 Irish • 6 0 to 6 6 Irish

36 0 to 40 0 Fine 95 to - North Country

-|Scotch

7 6 to 90 Butter, Beef, ge Gray Pease . . 53 to 58 Bran, per q. .

- to

Foreign 6 9 to 7 6 Butter, per cwt. s. Fine . 60 to 68 | Fine Pollard - to Malt p. 9gls. 11 0 to 13 0 Belfast 102 to Oats, per 45 lh.

100 to Seeds, &c.-Feb. 5.

Newry

0 Eng. new 4 6 to 4 9 Drogheda

96 to

0

Scotch pota. 4 7 to 4 9 Waterford .. 94 to Must. Brown, 12 to 20 Hempseed 65 to 70

Welsh 4 4 to 4 8 Cork, 3d 90 to 0 -White ... 14 to 20 Linsced, crush. 60 to 66 Irish,

4 6 to 4 92d, pickled

. 108 to 0 Tares . .... 12 to 17 New, for Seed 80 to 90 Common 4 0 to 4

7 Beef, p. tierce 95 to 100 Turnips .. 12 to 20 Ryegrass, . 10 to 40 Beans, pr qr.

60 to 65 -Red

Clover, Red,
– to 120 English
64 O to 65 0 Pork, p. brl.

95 to 105 -Yellow, new - White. - to 110 Foreign . . 64 0 to 65 0 Hams, dry,. 70.to

0 Carraway 70 to 72 Coriander

• 62 0 to 64 Bacon, Canary , 130 to New Trefoil - to

6011
Pease, per quar: Short middles 72 to 0
Boiling . '60 0 to 65 O Long

68 to New Rapeseed, £46 to £-,

0

Rapeseed, per last, £44 to £46. Average Prices of Corn of England and Wales, from the Returns received in the Week

ended 230 January 1819. Wheat, 79s. 5d.-Rye, 56s. 70.-Barley, 64s. 5d.-Oats, 34s. 10d.-Beans, 71s. 9d.-Pease, 70s. 5d.-

Oatmeal, 38s. 1d.-Beer or Big, Os. Od. Average Prices of British Corn in Scotland, by the Quarter of Eight Winchester Bushels,

and Oatmeal, per Bolt of 128 lbs. Scots Troy, or 140 lbs. Avoirdupois, of the Four

Weeks immediately preceding the 15th January 1819.
Wheat, 68s. 5d.-Rye, 5ls. 8d.—Barley, 18s. 7d. --Oats, 29s. 1d.-Beans, 49s. 11d. —Pease, 50s. 70.-

Oatmeal, 23s. 10d.-Beer or Big, 4ls. 6d.

.

p. barrel

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- to 250 Irish

.

Wheat.
Ist,......40s. Od.
2d, ..37s. 6d.
31, ......31s. 6d.

EDINBURGH.-FEBRUARY 3.
Barley.

Oats.
Ist,...... 42s. Od. 1st,......26s. 6d.
2d,

2d, ......--. Od.
3d, ..32s. Od.

3d,

.20s. Od. Average of Wheat, 21:17 : 6 : 8-12ths.

Pease & Beans. 1st,......27s. Od. 2d,......

......-S. (d. 3d,

.....-8. Od.

...... 205. Od.

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