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Chap. xli.

It was then that around me, though poor and unTHE PROPHECY.

known,

[thrown;

High spells of mysterious enchantment were The dark shall be light,

The streams were of silver, of diamond the dew, And the wrong made right,

The land was an Eden, for fancy was new. When Bertram's right and Bertram's might

I had heard of our bards, and my soul was on fire Shall meet on Ellangowan's height.

At the rush of their verse, and the sweep of their

lyre:
To me 'twas not legend, nor tale to the ear,

But a vision of noontide, distinguish'd and clear. (2.)—SONGS OF DIRK HATTERAICK AND

Ultonia's old heroes awoke at the call, shall; GLOSSIN.

And renew'd the wild pomp of the chase and the “And now I have brought you some breakfast, And the standard of Fion flashed fierce from on high,

Like the burst of the sun when the tempest is nigh.” said Glossin, producing some cold meat and a flask of spirits. The latter Hatteraick eagerly seized It seem'd that the harp of green Erin once more upon, and applied to his mouth; and, after a hearty Could renew all the glories she boasted of yore.draught, he exclaimed with great rapture, 'Das Yet why at remembrance, fond heart, shouldst

thou burn? schmeckt !—That is good that warms the liver !' - Then broke into the fragment of a High-Dutch They were days of delusion, and cannot return.

But was she, too, a phantom, the Maid who stood by, Saufen bier, und brante-wein,

And listed my lay, while she turn'd from mine eye?
Schmeissen alle die fenstern ein;

Was she too, a vision, just glancing to view,
Ich ben liederlich,

Then dispersed in the sunbeam, or melted to dew!

song:"

i First pablished in Mr. G. Thomson's Collection of Irish Airs. 1816.

? In ancient Irish poetry, the standard of Fion, or Fingal, is called the Sun-burst, an epithet feebly rendered by the Sunbeam of Macpherson.

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Macgregor's Gathering. 1816.

Air-" Thain' a Grigalach."'3 In the original Gaelic, the Lady makes protestations

WRITTEN FOR ALBYN'S ANTHOLOGY. that she will not go with the Red Earl's son, until the swan should build in the cliff, and the eagle

1816. in the lake-until one mountain should change places with another, and so forth. It is but fair These verses are adapted to a very wild, yet lively to add, that there is no authority for supposing

gathering-tune, used by the MacGregors. The that she altered her mindexcept the vehemence

severe treatment of this Clan, their outlawry, and of her protestation.

the proscription of their very name, are alluded

to in the Ballad. I. Hear what Highland Nora said,

The moon's on the lake, and the mist's on the brae, “ The Earlie's son I will not wed,

And the Clan has a name that is nameless by day; Should all the race of nature die,

Then gather, gather, gather Grigalach! And none be left but he and I.

Gather, gather, gather, &c.

1 "I will never go with him."

8 "The MacGregor is come.”

- For the history of the clan, see Introduction to Rob Roy Waverley Novels, vol. vii.

2 See also Mr. Thomson's Scottish Collection. 1822.

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O’er the peak of Ben-Lomond the galley shall steer,
And the rocks of Craig-Royston' like icicles melt,
Ere our wrongs be forgot, or our vengeance unfelt!

Then gather, gather, gather, Grigalach!
Gather, gather, gather, &c.

(1.)-TIME. “The window of a turret, which projected at an angle with the wall, and thus came to be very near Lovel's apartment, was half open, and from that quarter he heard again the same music which had probably broken short his dream. With its visionary character it had lost much of its charms -it was now nothing more than an air on the harpsichord, tolerably well performed—such is the caprice of imagination as affecting the fine arts. A female voice sung, with some taste and great simplicity, something between a song and a hymn, in words to the following effect:"—

Verses,

COMPOSED FOR THE OCCASION, ADAPTED TO HAYDN'S

AIR,
God Save the Emperor Francis,"

AND SUNG BY A SELECT BAND AFTER THE DINNER GIVEN

BY THE LORD PROVOST OF EDINBURGH TO THE

GRAND-DUKE NICHOLAS OF RUSSIA,

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AND HIS SUITE, 19TH DECEMBER, 1816.

God protect brave ALEXANDER, Heaven defend the noble Czar, Mighty Russia's high Commander,

“Know'st thou not me?" the Deep Voice cried;

"So long enjoy'd, so oft misused

1 “Rob Roy MacGregor's own designation was of Innersnaid ; but he appears to have acquired a right of some kind or other to the property or possession of Craig-Royston, a domain of rock and forest, lying on the east side of Loch Lomond, where that beautiful lake stretches into the dusky mountains of Glenfalloch."-Introd. to Rob Roy, Wave. Nov. vii. 31.

Mr., afterwards Sir William Arbuthnot, the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, who had the honor to entertain the Grand-Duke, now Emperor of Russia, was a personal friend of Sir Walter Scott's; and these Verses, with their heading, are now given from the newspapers of 1816.

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