History of Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge

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Cambridge University Press, 1991 - 521 páginas
Since its foundation in 1766, Addenbrooke's Hospital has strongly influenced both the development of medical practice and the social history of Cambridge. As one of Britain's first Voluntary Hospitals serving the needs of the sick, and as a center of medical teaching, Addenbrooke's has always been a focal point in the community as well as a prestigious institute in the wider medical sphere. This authoritative and absorbing account of the Hospital traces in detail its history and development, from its benefaction in 1719 by John Addenbrooke, through its early years of expansion, reforms, and modernization, and over the period of the two world wars. The final chapters bring the story up to date, with an account of the changes that have been seen since 1948, including the effects of the major reforms in the National Health Service and the establishment of a Clinical School. The authors have a long and close association with Addenbrooke's and have written a book that reflects their unequalled knowledge and insight into the medical history of Cambridge. Embellished with evocative and often rare documentary illustrations, this book will be of the greatest interest and value to all those associated with Addenbrooke's, past and present--clinicians, nursing and administrative staff, students, and patients as well as to anyone with an interest in social and medical history.
 

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Contenido

Introduction
1
The setting
3
The background
5
John Addenbrooke
12
Eighteenthcentury Cambridge
21
Building the Hospital
28
The Hospital opens its doors
37
The opening preparations
39
Medical teaching at Cambridge
235
Discontent among the medical staff
243
The building of the Clinical Laboratory
255
The founding of the Cambridge and District Workers Hospital Fund
263
Patients before the First World War
269
The reorganisation of the nurses
274
The building of the new Outpatient Department
280
Two World Wars
283

The first admissions
46
Income for the new Hospital
51
The medical staff
57
patients nursing and administration
68
A period of expansion
77
A turning point
79
Humphry and Paget join the medical staff
96
Sir George Paget
105
Sir George Humphry
110
Some Hospital extensions I 20
120
The Addenbrookes of Paget and Humphry
127
The catchment area
129
Early surgery and anaesthetics
138
Reports on the Hospital
143
A major reconstruction
146
The sick 1860 to 1900
154
Some of Addenbrookes earliest medical records
163
The first House Physician
179
The influence of Florence Nightingale
192
Administrative reform
205
The conditions of probationer nurses
215
The Hospital closes for reconstruction of the drains
222
Reforms and modernisation
233
The First World War
285
Building after the Great War
289
The Addenbrookes Hospital Maintenance Fund
302
The medical staff 1914 to 1948
310
A controversial appointment
332
Efforts to improve the nurses pay and training
341
The Training School for Nurses
363
The special departments
371
Addenbrookes and the University 1900 to 1948
379
Modern times
389
The early work of the Board of Governors
391
Planning a new hospital
397
Planning a Clinical School
405
The Board of Governors final years
420
Appendices
445
District nursing in Cambridge
447
Statistics on patients 1766 to 1947
449
Addenbrookes financial position over the years
451
to 1947
458
Notes and references
459
Index
504
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