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W 75

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1864, by

WALKER, WISE, AND COMPANY,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

BOSTON:

STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BY JOHN WILSON AND SON,

No. 5, Water Street.

PREFACE.

SINCE the adoption of the Federal Constitution, questions pertaining to slaves and slavery have often been pressed upon the Congress of the United States. Those questions, generally, originated by the slaveholding class, have, down to the 4th of March, 1861, almost uniformly resulted in the success of measures tending to the perpetuity and extension of slavery, and to the increase of its influence over the National Government. Since the breaking-out of the Rebellion, the exigencies of the nation have forced upon the 37th and 38th Congresses the consideration of a series of antislavery

These measures, so comprehensive in their scope and character, cannot fail to have a lasting influence upon the future of the country. I have sought, in this volume, to narrate, with brevity, fairness, and impartiality, the history of the antislavery legislation of Congress during the past three years of civil war. In tracing the words of the actors in these great measures of legislation, I have endeavored faithfully to give their ideas, or to quote their words, so as to present to

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measures.

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the reader their position, feelings, and opinions. Trusting that I have not wholly failed in my endeavors to record with fidelity this antislavery legislation, I present this volume to the public, in the hope that it will be of some little interest, especially to those who, amid years of obloquy and reproach, have labored and hoped for the dawning of that day, when, in all the wide circuit of our land, " the sun will not rise upon a master, or set upon a slave.”

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CONTENT S.

CHAPTER I.

SLAVES USED FOR INSURRECTIONARY PURPOSES MADE

FREE.

Slaves used in the Rebel Forces. Mr. Trambull's Proposition to free Slaves

used for Military Purposes. Mr. Trumbull's Speech. Mr. Breckinridge's Speech. Mr. Wilson's Speech. Mr. Breckinridge's Reply. Mr. M.Dougall's Speech. Mr. Ten Eyck's Speech. Mr. Pearce's Speech. Adoption of Mr. Trumbull's Amendment freeing Slaves used for Military Purposes. Substitute reported by the Judiciary Committee of the House. Substitute Rejected. Mr. Bingham's Speech. Mr. Burnett's Speech. Mr. Crittenden's Speech. Mr. Kellogg's Speech. Mr. Cox's Motion to lay the Bill on the Table. Mr. Pendleton's Speech. Mr. Stevens's Speech. Mr. Diven's Speech. Mr. Pendleton's Motion to recommit the Bill carried. Bill reported back with an Amendment. Mr. Holman's Motion to lay the Bill on the Table. Passage of the Bill.

pp. 1-16.

CHAPTER II.

FUGITIVE

SLAVES NOT TO BE RETURNED BY PERSONS IN

THE ARMY.

Surrender of Slaves coming within the Lines of the Union Armies. Mr.

Lovejoy's Resolution. Notice of a Bill by Mr. Wilson. Mr. Lovejoy's Bill. Mr. Sumner's Resolution. Mr. Cowan's Speech. Resolution of Mr. Wilson of Iowa. Bill of Mr. Wilson of Massachusetts. Mr. Wilson's Bill considered. Mr. Saulsbury's Motion to postpone indefinitely. Mr. Collamer's Amendment. Mr. Powell's Speech. Mr. Collamer's Speech. Mr. Wilson's Speech. Mr. Pearce's Speech. Mr. Blair's Bill to make an additional Article of War. Mr. Bingham's Speech. Mr. Vallandigham's Motion to lay the Bill on the Table. Passage of the House Bill. Reported by Mr. Wilson in the Senate. Mr. Davis's

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