Digest of Opinions of the Judge Advocate General of the Army: Containing a Selection of Official Opinions Furnished to the President, the Secretary of War, the Adjutant General, Heads of Bureaus of the War Department, Commanding Officers, Judge Advocates and Members of Military Courts, and Other Officers of the Army and Soldiers - Between September, 1862, and July, 1868

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1901 - 393 páginas
 

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Página 495 - Those rivers must be regarded as public navigable rivers in law which are navigable in fact. And they are navigable in fact when they are used, or are susceptible of being used, in their ordinary condition, as highways for commerce, over which trade and travel are or may be conducted in the customary modes of trade and travel on water.
Página 169 - Provided, That such structures may be built under authority of the legislature of a State across rivers and other waterways the navigable portions of which lie wholly within the limits of a single State, provided the location and plans thereof are submitted to and approved by the Chief of Engineers and by the Secretary of War...
Página 769 - In pursuance of this authority, the act of 1795 has provided "that whenever the United States shall be invaded, or be in imminent danger of invasion from any foreign nation or Indian tribe, it shall be lawful for the President of the United States to call forth such number of the militia of the state or states most convenient to the place of danger, or scene of action, as he may judge necessary to repel such invasion, and to issue his order for that purpose to such officer or officers of the militia...
Página 750 - No. 100, of 1863 (Instructions for the Government of the Armies of the United States in the Field), and to have been decided in favor of the permanency of these regulations.
Página 791 - ... of which its great powers will admit, and of all the means by which they may be carried into execution, would partake of the prolixity of a legal code, and could scarcely be embraced by the human mind. It would probably never be understood by the public. Its nature, therefore, requires, that only its great outlines should be marked, its important objects designated, and the minor ingredients which compose those objects be deduced from the nature of the objects themselves.
Página 789 - ... a post route and military road subject to the use of the United States for postal, military, naval, and other government services, and also, subject to such regulations as Congress may impose restricting the charges for such government transportation...
Página 770 - That whenever the laws of the United States shall be opposed, or the execution thereof obstructed, in any State, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals...
Página 207 - They are legislative courts, created in virtue of the general right of sovereignty which exists in the government, or in virtue of that clause which enables congress to make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory belonging to the United States.
Página 673 - No person who may hereafter be a collector or holder of public moneys, shall have a seat in either house of the general assembly...
Página 694 - For the recognition of the independence of the people of Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and government in the island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters, and directing the President of the United States to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these resolutions into effect...

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