Account of a Voyage of Discovery to the West Coast of Corea and the Great Loo-Choo Island

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Printed and pub. by Abraham Small, 1818 - 201 páginas
 

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Página 96 - The most common worm is in the form of a star, with arms from four to six inches long, which are moved about with a rapid motion in all directions, probably to catch food. Others are so sluggish, that they may be mistaken for pieces of the rock, and are generally of a dark colour, and from four to five inches long, and two or three round.
Página 96 - ... invisible. These animals are of a great variety of shapes and sizes, and in such prodigious numbers, that, in a short time, the whole surface of the rock appears to be alive and in motion. The most common of the worms at Loo-Choo is in the form of...
Página 97 - When the coral is broken, about high-water, it is a solid, hard stone ; but if any part of it be detached at a spot which the tide reaches every day, it is found to be full of worms of different lengths and colours ; some being as fine as a thread, and several feet long, of a bright yellow, and sometimes of a blue colour ; others resemble snails, and some are not unlike lobsters in shape, but soft, and not above two inches long.
Página 140 - ... over the lower ones, giving his face a remarkable, but not a disagreeable expression. He is always cheerful, and often lively and playful, but his good sense prevents his ever going beyond the line of strict propriety. When required by etiquette to be grave, no one is so immoveably serious as Madera, and when mirth rules the hour, he is the gayest of the gay: such indeed is his taste on these occasions, that he not only catches the outward tone of his company, but really appears to think and...
Página 178 - Sunday, 27th of October. — At daybreak we unmoored, and the natives, on seeing us take up one of our anchors, thought we were going to get under weigh immediately, and give them the slip, which was not at all intended. This alarm, however, brought the chiefs off in a great hurry ; not in a body in their usual formal way, but one by one, in separate canoes. Old Jeema called on board the Lyra on his way to the frigate ; he was a good deal agitated, and the tears came into his eyes when I put a ring...
Página 180 - I found the chiefs seated in a row, all very disconsolate, and apparently trying to conceal emotions different, in all probability, from any which they had ever before experienced. Captain Maxwell had made them his parting present, and I therefore gave to each chief some trifle, receiving from them in return, their knives, pipes, pouches, and fans. In the mean time the anchor was hove up, and every thing being ready for making sail, the chiefs rose to take leave. Ookooma wished to say something,...
Página 138 - Madera has made great improvement in English, and his character is altogether more developed. He is quite at his ease in our company, and seems to take the most extraordinary, interest in every thing belonging to us ; but his ardent desire to inform himself on all subjects sometimes distresses him a good deal; he observes the facility with which we do some things, and his...
Página 178 - Before he left the Lyra he gave Mr. Clifford his pipe, tobacco pouch, and a crystal ornament ; saying, as he held out the last, " You go Ingeree, you give this to your childs.
Página 19 - ... him. He ordered an attendant to pour it into several bowls, and putting the bottle away, made signs for us to drink, but would not taste it himself till all of us had been served. He was nowise discomposed at being obliged to entertain his company at their own expense ; on the contrary, he carried off the whole affair with so much cheerfulness and ease, as to make...
Página 94 - It was interesting to observe, indeed, how early the gentle and engaging manners of all classes here won upon the sailors no lea* than upon the officers. The natives from the first were treated with entire confidence : no watch was ever kept over them, nor were they excluded from any part of the ships; and not only was nothing stolen, but when any thing was lost, nobody even suspected for an instant that it had been taken by them.

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