Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens: A History of Indian-white Relations in Canada

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University of Toronto Press, 2000 M01 1 - 481 páginas

Highly acclaimed when the first edition appeared in 1989, "Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens" is the first comprehensive account of Indian-white relations throughout Canada's history. J.R. Miller charts the deterioration of the relationship from the initial, mutually beneficial contact in the fur trade to the current impasse in which Indians are resisting displacement and marginalization.

This new edition is the result of substantial revision to incorporate current scholarship and bring the text up to date. It includes new material on the North, and reflects changes brought about by the Oka crisis, the sovereignty issue, and the various court decisions of the 1990s. It also includes new material on residential schools, treaty making, and land claims.

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An important overview of the relationship between settlers and native peoples in Canada. The headings of the three sections of the book sum up the story concisely: Co-operation, Coercion and Confrontation. Leer comentario completo

Contenido

Indians and Europeans at the Time of Contact
3
COOPERATION
23
Early Contacts in the Eastern Woodlands
25
Commercial Partnership and Mutual Benefit
50
Military Allies through a Century of Warfare
72
COERCION
101
From Alliance to Irrelevance
103
Reserves Residential Schools and the Threat of Assimilation
125
The Commercial Frontier on the Western Plains
148
Contact Commerce and Christianity on the Pacific
174
Resistance in Red River and the Numbered Treaties
197
The NorthWest Rebellion
225
The Beginnings of Political Organization
311
Notes
413
Select Bibliography
449
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Acerca del autor (2000)

J.R. Miller is a Canada Research Chair and professor in the Department of History at the University of Saskatchewan.

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