The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought, Volumen1

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Cambridge University Press, 2006 M08 31 - 919 páginas
This major work of academic reference provides a comprehensive overview of the development of western political thought during the European enlightenment. Written by a distinguished team of international contributors, this Cambridge History is the latest in a sequence of volumes that is now firmly established as the principal reference source for the history of political thought. Every major theme in eighteenth-century political thought is covered in a series of essays at once scholarly and accessible, and the essays are complemented by extensive guides for further reading, and brief biographical notes of the major characters in the text, including Rousseau, Montesquieu and David Hume. Of interest and relevance to students and scholars of politics and history at all levels from beginning undergraduate upwards, this volume chronicles one of the most exciting and rewarding of all periods in the development of western thinking about politics, man (and increasingly woman), and society.
 

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Contenido

Introduction I
1
The ancien régime and its critics
9
The English system of liberty
40
Piety and politics in the century of lights
110
The new light of reason
147
Voltaire
159
Encyclopedias and the diffusion of knowledge
172
Optimism progress and philosophical history
195
The positive duties of the legislator in commercial society
457
Property community and citizenship
465
Needs and society
471
Property and the progress of the arts and sciences
475
The Gracchi and their legacy
480
S A modern agrarian
488
Conclusion
492
The promotion of public happiness 17 Philosophical kingship and enlightened despotism
497

Naturalism anthropology and culture
218
German natural law
251
IO Natural rights in the Scottish Enlightenment
291
The mixed constitution and the common law
317
Social contract theory and its critics
347
The equilibrium between consent and natural law in Locke
350
Bossuet and the challenge of divine right to contract theory
354
The anticontractarianism of Hume and Bentham
355
French contractarianism before Rousseau
358
Rousseau and the radicalisation of social contract theory
362
Kant and the social contract as an ideal of reason
369
The decline of social contract theory
373
Commerce luxury and political economy 13 The early Enlightenment debate on commerce and luxury
379
Fénelon
383
Mandeville
387
Shaftesbury
395
s Hutcheson
399
Berkeley
401
The early Montesquieu
404
Melon
409
Voltaire
412
Physiocracy and the politics of laissezfaire
419
from Quesnay to Turgot
425
From wealth creation to legal despotism
429
Critiques of physiocracy and later responses
434
Physiocracy outside France
438
Conclusions
441
IS Scottish political economy
443
Legislators versus politicians in a mercantile state
449
The conditions of growth
452
Frederick II Catherine II Joseph II
504
The idea of despotism
511
The idea of the enlightened despot
514
Conclusion
522
Cameralism and the sciences of the state
525
Oeconomy and the Hausvaterliteratur
530
Justi
537
Sonnenfels
542
Utilitarianism and the reform of the criminal law
547
Liberty and the criminal law
548
Crime and punishment in Beccaria
551
Benthams theory of proportion
557
The debate over the death penalty
563
Transportation and imprisonment
566
Enlightenment and reform
568
Republicanism and popular sovereignty
573
Mably
577
Diderot
579
Venice and Geneva
583
Kant
587
Fichte
592
Humboldt
596
The Enlightenment and revolution
601
Political languages of the French Revolution
626
British radicalism and the antiJacobins
660
Ideology and the origins of social science
688
Biographies
711
Bibliography
787
Index
901
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Mark Goldie is a University Senior Lecturer in History and a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge.

Mark Goldie is a University Senior Lecturer in History and a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge.

Robert Wokler (1942-2006) taught for many years at the University of Manchester, and subsequently taught at Yale University, Connecticut.

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