My Life's Record: A Fight for Justice

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Gibbings & Company, 1901 - 206 páginas
 

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Página 132 - I take it to be settled at this day that the pardon of a treason or felony, even after a conviction or attainder, does so far clear the party from the infamy and all other consequences of his crime that he may not only have an action for a scandal in calling him traitor or felon after the time of the pardon, but may also be a good witness notwithstanding the attainder or conviction; because the pardon makes him, as it were, a new man, and gives him a new capacity and credit.
Página 131 - Be it therefore enacted, that where any offender hath been, or shall be, convicted of any felony not punishable with death, and hath endured or shall endure the punishment to which such offender hath been or shall be adjudged for the same, the punishment so endured hath and shall have the like effects and consequences as a pardon under the Great Seal as to the felony whereof the offender was so convicted...
Página 131 - Perjury), and hath endured or shall endure the Punishment to which such Offender hath been or shall be adjudged for the same, such Offender shall not, after the Punishment so endured, be deemed to...
Página 131 - ... offender hath been or shall be adjudged for the same, the punishment so endured hath and shall have the like effects and consequences as a pardon under the great seal as to the felony whereof the offender was so convicted : provided always, that nothing herein contained, nor the enduring of such punishment, shall prevent or mitigate any punishment to which the offender might otherwise be lawfully sentenced on a subsequent conviction for any other felony.
Página 58 - ... to these peculiar ice-forms. You are quite at liberty to make any use you please of this note. I am, dear Sir, yours faithfully, JOHN D. PAUL Iridescent Clouds THE iridescent colours in clouds, observed in England and Scotland in December last, were also visible here December 8, 9, lo, and 12.
Página 132 - WUkins, at page 82 of the report. The distinction is not a verbal one merely; but the two statements would have a different effect. A man stating that another was a felon would be listened to as informing his hearers that the individual was infamous and to be shunned ; but a man who stated that another man (perhaps the editor of a newspaper and in a respectable position) had been convicted of felony twenty or thirty years ago would probably himself be more condemned than the man he spoke of.
Página 101 - ... not even declared to need the restraint of a British Resident. The following is from the pen of one who was well behind the scenes among English politicians, and never failed to express himself in studiously moderate language. The words were addressed to a correspondent in Natal : — " There is ... a strong feeling here about Sir H. Bulwer's resettlement of Zululand. The Liberal party is filled with dismay at the weakness of the Government in yielding to the influence of a man who was known...
Página 133 - Geo. 4, c. 82, 8. 3, the legislature deliberately adopted the view of the judges : it was considered to be proper that a person who had endured the punishment for a felony should not be liable to have reflections made upon him.
Página 101 - ... dismay at the weakness of the Government in yielding to the influence of a man who was known to be hostile to their policy. What Sir Henry Bulwer fails to understand is that, while there are a hundred questions connected with South Africa which the British public are content to leave to men like him who belong to the official class, this is a subject with regard to which the nation has developed something like a conscience. When Parliament and the country made up their minds to restore Cetshwayo,...
Página 101 - ... addressed to a correspondent in Natal : — " There is ... a strong feeling here about Sir H. Bulwer's resettlement of Zululand. The Liberal party is filled with dismay at the weakness of the Government in yielding to the influence of a man who was known to be hostile to their policy. What Sir Henry Bulwer fails to understand is that, while there are a hundred questions connected with South Africa which the British public are content to leave to men like him who belong to the official class,...

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