The Aborigines of Tasmania

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F. King & Sons, 1899 - 228 páginas
 

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Página xlviii - In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. 2 And the earth was without form, and void ; and darkness was upon the face of the deep, And the spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. 3 And God said, Let there be light ; and there was light. 4 And God saw the light, that it was good : and God divided the light from the darkness.
Página xlviii - ... •'So God created man in his own image. In the image of God created He him; male and female created He...
Página 104 - I believe, they have no. settled place of habitation (as their houses seemed built only for a few days), but wander about in small parties from place to place in search of food, and are actuated by no other motive. We never found more than three or four huts in a place, capable of containing three or four persons each only...
Página 43 - Soon after we heard their voices like the cackling of geese, and twenty persons came out of the wood, twelve of whom went round to some rocks where the boat could get nearer to the shore than we then were. Those who remained behind were women. We approached within twenty yards of them, but there was no possibility of landing and I could only throw to the shore, tied up in paper, the presents which I intended for them. I showed the different articles as I tied them up, but they would not untie the...
Página 181 - Jemmy's father's wife," and so on. Such a practice must, it is clear, have contributed materially to reduce the number of their substantive appellations, and to create a necessity for new phonetic symbols to represent old ideas, which new vocables would, in all probability, differ on each occasion, and in every separate tribe ; the only chance of fusion of words between tribes arising out of the capture of females for wives from hostile and alien people — a custom generally prevalent, and doubtless...
Página 59 - If an offence be committed against the tribe, the delinquent has to stand, while a certain number of spears are, at the same time, thrown at him. These, from the unerring aim with which they are thrown, he can seldom altogether avoid, although from the quickness of his sight he will frequently escape unhurt. He moves not from his place, avoiding the spears merely by the contortions of his body.
Página 88 - Hitherto we had but a faint idea of the pains the women take to procure the food requisite for the subsistence of their families. They each took a basket and were followed by their daughters, who did the same. Getting on the rocks that jutted out into the water they plunged from them to the bottom in search of shell fish.
Página 181 - They possessed no words representing abstract ideas ; for each variety of gumtree and wattle-tree, etc., etc., they had a name, but they had no equivalent for the expression, ' a tree ; ' neither could they express abstract qualities, such as hard, soft, warm, cold, long, short, round, etc.; for 'hard,' they would say ' like a stone,' for ' tall,' they would say ' long legs,' etc., and for k round,' they said 'like a ball,'
Página 41 - As we approached the shore, we observed several of the natives about the fire, and walking among the trees, some of them carrying very long poles and pieces of lighted wood in their hands. When they perceived we had landed, and were pretty near them, they began to chatter very loud and walk away ; upon which we called to them, imitating their noise as well as we could, and had the satisfaction to see them stop at a little distance from us. Several of them having long poles or spears in their hands,...
Página 120 - During the whole of the first night after the death of one of their tribe they will sit round the body, using rapidly a low.

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