The Nicaragua Canal and the Monroe Doctrine: A Political History of Isthmus Transit, with Special Reference to the Nicaragua Canal Project and the Attitude of the United States Government Thereto

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G. P. Putnam, 1896 - 622 páginas
 

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PART ONE THE MERCANTILE PERIOD AND THE ABSOLUTE MONARCHYTHE CANAL PROJECT A ROYAL MONOPOLY 14921815
19
The Forces Back of this Movement
21
The Mercantile System
25
FifteenthCentury Voyages of Discovery
29
The Discoveries of Columbus and his Contemporaries
30
The Popes Bull and the Treaty of Tordesillas
33
The New World Thought to be an Island
34
Spanish Colonial Expeditions to the Northwest
36
The Discovery of the Southwest Passage
40
The Discovery of the West Coast of Central America
46
The Discovery of the West Coast of North America
54
Independent Action of the Several States in Regard to
63
The Kingdom of Guatemala
65
CHAPTER III
71
The Treaty of 1670 between Spain and England
77
The British Colony at Caledonian Bay
85
Nelsons Attack on the San Juan
100
44 Supplementary Treaty of 1786
105
The Treaty of Versailles 1783
106
Events in Central America during the Period of the Great Continental Struggle in Europe
108
CHAPTER V
113
114
116
PART TWO THE PERIOD OF LIBERALISM AND INDIVIDUAL INITIATIVETHE CANAL PROJECT A PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL UNDERT...
123
Ferdinand de Lessepss Interest in the Canal Project
124
The Four Canal Projects
130
CHAPTER VII
149
59 The King of Hollands Canal Project 60 President Jacksons Policy towards the Transit Question 61 The Petition to Congress and the Stephens Rec...
151
Louis Philippes Canal Project
159
The English Settlers and the Mosquito Indians
167
Objections on the Part of the SpanishAmerican States
173
CHAPTER IX
185
The Compania de Transito de Nicaragua and the Hise
193
The Seizure of Tigre Island
199
The Diplomatic Situation in 1850
215
THE CENTRAL AMERICAN IMBROGLIO
217
Costa Rican Claims
223
The Basis of Settlement
229
Lord Clarendons Ultimatum
235
CHAPTER XII
248
Sir William Ouseleys Mission
256
CHAPTER XVI
320
Supplementary Expeditions
328
129
351
CHAPTER XVIII
362
142
368
CHAPTER XIX
389
Blaines Circular Letter to the Powers of Europe
396
Blaine Opens the Diplomatic Campaign with Great Britain
398
Lord Granvilles Reply to Blaines Circular Letter
402
149
403
The British Reply to Blaines Theoretical Argument and Historical Objections
404
151
408
Mr Frelinghuysen Takes up the American Case and Answers Lord Granvilles Despatches
409
Lord Granvilles Traversal of Mr Frelinghuysens Case
412
Conclusion of the Correspondence
414
154
417
The Maritime Canal Company of Nicaragua
422
156
423
The Collapse of the Panama Canal Project
427
The Abandonment of the United States Governmental Canal Project
433
CHAPTER XXI
437
President Clevelands Award in the Boundary Dispute
439
British and Americans in Mosquitia
444
The Incorporation of the Maritime Canal Company by the United States Government
448
The Inauguration of the Work in Nicaragua
450
164 Expeditions of Inspection
451
The Blackman Claim and the Guaranty Bill of 1891
454
How Popular Interest in the Canal Project was Aroused
456
The Guaranty Bill of 1892
460
Efforts to Raise Funds by Private Subscription
461
CHAPTER XXII
463
Nicaragua
464
Panama Nicaragua 171 The Diplomatic Situation Panama Nicaragua
496
PROBABILITIES AND POSSIBILITIES OF THE FUTURETHE NICARAGUA CANAL A NATIONAL AMERICAN UNDERTAKING CHAPTER X...
511
A Method of Inquiry
515
Zone A Nicaragua versus Suez and the Cape 175 Zone B Nicaragua versus the Horn 176 Zone C Nicaraguas Monopoly of Seaborne Commerce 17...
521
CHAPTER XXIV
556
APPENDIX A Treaty between the United States and New Granada 1848 extracts APPENDIX B ClaytonBulwer Treaty 1850 full text APPENDIX C D...
599
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Página 135 - The question presented by the letters you have sent me, is the most momentous which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of Independence. That made us a nation, this sets our compass and points the course which we are to steer through the ocean of time opening on us.
Página 135 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Página 600 - States guarantee positively and efficaciously to New Granada, by the present stipulation, the perfect neutrality of the before-mentioned Isthmus, with the view that the free transit from the one to the other sea, may not. be interrupted or embarrassed in any future time while this treaty exists; and in consequence the United States also guarantees, in the same manner, the rights of sovereignty and property which New Granada has and possesses over the said territory.
Página 135 - Our first and fundamental maxim should be, never to entangle ourselves in the broils of Europe ; our second, never to suffer Europe to intermeddle with cisatlantic affairs.
Página 602 - V. The contracting parties further engage that, when the said Canal shall have been completed they will protect it from interruption, seizure or unjust confiscation, and that they will guarantee the neutrality thereof, so that the said Canal may forever lie open and free, and the capital invested therein, secure.
Página 375 - An interoceanic canal across the American Isthmus will essentially change the geographical relations between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States, and between the United States and the rest of the world.
Página 139 - An agreement between all the parties represented at the meeting, that each will guard, by its own means, against the establishment of any future European colony within its borders, may be found advisable.
Página 603 - Britain determine to give their support and encouragement to such persons or company as may first offer to commence the same, with the necessary capital, the consent of the local authorities, and on such principles as accord with the spirit and intention of this convention...
Página 599 - The United States of America and the Republic of New Granada, desiring to make as durable as possible the relations which are to be established between the two parties by virtue of this treaty, have declared solemnly, and do agree to the following points: 1st.
Página 599 - For the better understanding of the preceding articles, it is and has been stipulated between the high contracting parties that the citizens, vessels, and merchandise of the United States shall enjoy in the ports of New Granada, including...

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