Arctic Explorations and Discoveries During the Nineteenth Century: Being Detailed Accounts of the Several Expeditions to the North Seas, Both English and American, Conducted by Ross, Parry, Back, Franklin, M'Clure, Dr. Kane, and Others, Including the Long and Fruitless Efforts and Failures in Search of Sir John Franklin. Ed. and Completed to 1855

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W. L. Allison, 1886 - 640 páginas
 

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Página 292 - Venerable, off the coast of Holland, the i2th of October, by log (nth1 three PM Camperdown ESE eight mile. Wind N. by E. Sir, I have the pleasure to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that...
Página 132 - West of England Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce, was unanimously voted to him.
Página 257 - Down sank the baleful crimson sun, The Northern Light came out, And glared upon the ice-bound ships And shook its spears about. The snow came down, storm breeding storm, And on the decks was laid, Till the weary sailor, sick at heart, Sank down beside his spade. "Sir John, the night is black and long ; The hissing wind is bleak ; The hard green ice is strong as death : I prithee, captain, speak ! " The night is neither bright nor short; The singing breeze is cold ; The ice is not so strong as hope...
Página 108 - ... the ship received. We found, by the well, that she made no water, and by dark she struck no more. God was merciful to us, and the tide, almost miraculously, fell no lower.
Página 55 - Previous to setting out the whole party ate the remains of their old shoes and whatever scraps of leather they had to strengthen their stomachs for the fatigue of the day's journey.
Página 108 - Never perhaps was witnessed a finer scene than on the deck of my little ship, when all hope of life had left us. Noble as the character of the British sailor is always allowed to be, in cases of danger, yet I did not believe it to be possible, that among forty-one persons, not one repining word should have been uttered.
Página 49 - Our diet consisted almost entirely of reindeer meat, varied twice a week by fish and occasionally by a little flour, but we had no vegetables of any description. On the Sunday mornings we drank a cup of chocolate but our greatest luxury was tea (without sugar) of which we regularly partook twice a day.
Página 567 - We hailed it in God's name. It ate the food it ne'er had eat, And round and round it flew. The ice did split with a thunder-fit; The helmsman steered us through ! 70 And a good south wind sprung up behind; The Albatross did follow, And every day, for food or play, Came to the mariners...
Página 111 - ... weeks, but for more than half a year together. Whichever way the eye is turned, it meets a picture calculated to impress upon the mind an idea of inanimate stillness, of that motionless torpor with which our feelings have nothing congenial ; of anything, in short, but life. In the very silence there is a deadness with which a human spectator appears out of "keeping. The presence of man seems an intrusion on the dreary solitude of this wintry desert, which even its native animals have for awhile...
Página 153 - did I share my own plate with the children, whose helpless state and piteous cries were peculiarly distressing ; compassion for the full grown may, or may not, be felt, but that heart must be cased in steel which is insensible to the cry of a child for food.

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