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rior to envy. He was undisguised, and perfectly sincere. I am induced to think, that he entered into orders, more from fome private and fixed resolution, than from absolute choice. Be that as it may, he performed the duties of the church with great punctuality, and a decent degree of devotion. He read prayers rather in a strong nervous voice, than in a graceful manner : And although he has been often accused of irreligion, nothing of that kind appeared in his convertation or behaviour. His caft of mind induced him to think and speak more of politics than of religion. His perpetual views were directed towards power; and his chief aim was to be removed into England : But when he found himself entirely disappointed, he turned his thoughts to opposition, and became the patron of Ireland.

Few characters have afforded so great a variety of faults and beauties. Few men have been more known and admired, or more envied and censured, than Dr Swift. From the gifts of nature he had great powers, and from the imperfection of humanity he had many failings. I always confidered him as an abstract and brief chronicle of the times; no man being better acquainted with human nature, both in the highest and in the loweft scenes of life. His friends and correfpondents were the greatest and most eminent men of

The sages of antiquity were often the companions of his closet : And although he induftriously avoided an ostentation of learning,

and

the age.

Some particulars in Dr Swift's CHARAC

TER, extracted from Lord ORRERY'S
Remarks, and Mr Swift's Essay.

From LORD ORRER Y.

R Swift was in the decline of life when I

knew him. His friendship was an honour to me ; and, to say the truth, I have even drawn advantage from his errors. I have beheld him in all humours and dispositions ; and I have formed various fpeculations from the several weaknesfes to which I observed him liable. His capacity and strength of mind were undoubtedly equal to any task whatever. His pride, his spirit, or his ambition, call it by what name you please, was boundless : But his views were checked in his younger years, and the anxiety of that disappointment had a visible effect upon all his actions. He was four and severe, but not abfolutely illnatured. He was fociable only to particular friends, and to them only at particular hours. He knew politeness more than he practised it. He was a mixture of avarice and generosity : The former was frequently prevalent; the latter feldom appeared, unless excited by compassion. He was open to adulation ; and could not, or would not, distinguish between low flattery and just applause. His abilities rendered him fupe

rior to envy. He was undisguised, and perfectly fincere. I am induced to think, that he entered into orders, more from some private and fixed resolution, than from absolute choice. Be that as it may, he performed the duties of the church with great punctuality, and a decent degree of devotion. He read prayers rather in a strong nervous voice, than in a graceful manner : And although he has been often accused of irreligion, nothing of that kind appeared in his conversation or behaviour. His cast of mind induced him to think and speak more of politics than of religion. His perpetual views were directed towards power; and his chief aim was to be removed into England : But when he found himfelf entirely disappointed, he turned his thoughts to opposition, and became the patron of Ireland.

Few characters have afforded so great a variety of faults and beauties. Few men have been more known and admired, or more envied and censured, than Dr Swift. From the gifts of nature he had great powers, and from the imperfection of humanity he had many failings. I always confidered him as an abstract and brief chronicle of the times; no man being better acquainted with human nature, both in the highest and in the lowest scenes of life. His friends and correfpondents were the greatest and most eminent men of the age. The sages of antiquity were often the companions of his closet: And although he industriously avoided an ostentation of learning,

and

and generally chose to draw his materials from his own store ; yet his knowledge in the ancient authors, evidently appears from the strength of his sentiments, and the classic correctness of his style.

His attendance upon the public service of the church, was regular, and uninterrupted. And indeed regularity was peculiar to him in all his actions, even in the greatest trifles. His hours of walking and reading, never varied. His motions were guided by his watch, which was so constantly held in his hand, or placed before him upon his table, that he feldom deviated many minutes, in the daily revolution of his exercises and employments.

From Mr DE A NE SWIFT.

THE character of Dr Swift is so exceedingly strange, various, and perplexed, that it can never be drawn up with any degree of accuracy. I shall, however, remark some few particulars, without venturing to attempt the delineation of a character, which hath entirely baffled all endeavours hitherto made, either by friends or enemies.

SWIFT's natural temper seems to have been a miraculous compound of the placid and the severe. The placid frequently had the superiority in his breast; and the fevere, in its turn, when excited by the follies and corruptions of humankind, as frequently the predominance.

He

He was by nature of a spirit wonderfully exalted. His pride, if pride it must be called, was of a turn peculiar to himself. His whole deportment was of a piece. He would not have stooped to converse with the greatest monarch in Europe, upon any terms lower than equality.

He knew to a point the respect that was due to him ; which he took care to exact without any sort of abatements. It will

appear from the following instance, with what quickness he resented any failure in good manners. An English clergyman, appointed a Bishop in Ireland, fent his fervant one morning to the Dean, to beg the favour of him to order St Patrick's cathedral to be got ready against the next Sunday for his consecration. The Doctor would by no means grant his requeft; but faid, he would order the church to be in readiness against the Sunday following. When the servant was gone, the Doctor told a friend, then with him, that he could as well have had the church ready against the next, as against the following Sunday : But, said he, my reason for refusing to grant that gentleman's request, was, because he ought to have come himself, and not sent his servant to me upon

such a milage.

Neither could he endure to be treated with any sort of familiarity, or that any man living (his three or four old acquaintances in England only excepted) ihould rank himself in the number of his friends. A young person of quality, VOL. I.

o

upon

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