The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Volumen4

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A. and C. Black, 1828
 

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Página 365 - rigged' for travelling, we breakfasted upon warm cocoa and biscuit, and after stowing the things in the boats and on the sledges, so as to secure them, as much as possible, from wet, we set off on our day's journey and usually travelled from five to five and a half hours, then stopped an hour to dine, and again travelled four, five, or even six hours according to circumstances.
Página 366 - ... -feet above the sea,) in order to obtain a better view around us ; and nothing could well exceed the dreariness which such a view presented. The eye wearied itself in vain to find an object but ice and sky to rest upon ; and even the latter was often hidden from our view by the dense and dismal fogs which so generally prevailed. For want of variety, the most trifling circumstance engaged a more than ordinary share of our attention ; a passing gull, or a mass of ice of unusual form, became objects...
Página 365 - Traveling by night, and sleeping by day, so completely inverted the natural order of things that it was difficult to persuade ourselves of the reality. Even the officers and myself, who were all furnished with pocket chronometers, could not always bear in mind at what part of the...
Página 370 - For the last few days, the eighty-third parallel was the limit to which we had ventured to extend our hopes ; but even this expectation had become considerably weakened since the setting in of the last northerly wind, which continued to drive us to the southward, during the necessary hours of rest, nearly as much as we could gain by eleven or twelve hours of daily labour. Had our success been at all proportionate to our exertions, it was my full intention to have proceeded a few days beyond the middle...
Página 148 - What can be more delightful than a midnight walk by moonlight along the lone sea-beach of some secluded isle, the glassy sea sending from its surface a long stream of dancing and dazzling light, — no sound to be heard save the small ripple of the idle wavelet, or the scream of a sea-bird watching the fry that swarms along the shores ! In the short nights of summer, the melancholy song of the throstle has scarcely ceased on the hill-side when the merry carol of...
Página 364 - ... which is common in all snowy countries. We also thus enjoyed greater warmth during the hours of rest, and had a better chance of drying our clothes ; besides which, no small advantage was derived from the snow being harder at night for travelling. The only disadvantage of this plan was, that the fogs were somewhat more frequent and more thick by night than by day, though even in this respect there was less difference than might have been supposed, the temperature during the twenty-four hours...
Página 371 - ... were performed by water previously to our entering the ice. As we travelled by far the greater part of our distance on the ice, three, and not unfrequently five, times over, we may safely multiply the length of the road by two and a half; so that our whole distance, on a very moderate calculation, amounted to five hundred and eighty geographical, or six hundred and sixtyeight statute miles, being nearly sufficient to have reached the Pole in a direct line.
Página 254 - Salmon cannot work with his head down stream, for the water then going into his gills the wrong way, drowns him. When the furrow is made, the male and female retire to a little distance, one to the one side, and the other to the other side of the furrow; they then throw themselves on their sides, again come together, and rubbing against each other, both shed their spawn into the furrow at the same time. This process is not completed at once; it requires from eight to twelve days for them to lay all...
Página 108 - At first sight, this may seem paradoxical enough, if not thoroughly absurd ; but to solve it, we have only to consider, that, when the wind is from the east, its diurnal motion round the earth's axis is thereby lessened, its centrifugal force will be of course weakened...
Página 371 - ... hundred and sixty-eight statute miles, being nearly sufficient to have reached the Pole in a direct line. Up to this period we had been particularly fortunate in the preservation of our health ; neither sickness nor casualties having occurred among us, with the exception of the trifling accidents already mentioned, a few bowel complaints, which were soon removed by care, and some rather troublesome cases of chilblains arising from our constant exposure to wet and cold.' — pp. 104, 105. The...

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