Animal Social Complexity: Intelligence, Culture, and Individualized Societies

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Frans B. M. De Waal, Peter L Tyack
Harvard University Press, 2009 - 640 páginas

For over 25 years, primatologists have speculated that intelligence, at least in monkeys and apes, evolved as an adaptation to the complicated social milieu of hard-won friendships and bitterly contested rivalries. Yet the Balkanization of animal research has prevented us from studying the same problem in other large-brained, long-lived animals, such as hyenas and elephants, bats and sperm whales. Social complexity turns out to be widespread indeed. For example, in many animal societies one individual's innovation, such as tool use or a hunting technique, may spread within the group, thus creating a distinct culture. As this collection of studies on a wide range of species shows, animals develop a great variety of traditions, which in turn affect fitness and survival.

The editors argue that future research into complex animal societies and intelligence will change the perception of animals as gene machines, programmed to act in particular ways and perhaps elevate them to a status much closer to our own. At a time when humans are perceived more biologically than ever before, and animals as more cultural, are we about to witness the dawn of a truly unified social science, one with a distinctly cross-specific perspective?

 

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Contenido

Life History and Brain Evolution
1
Life History and Cognitive Evolution in Primates
5
Sociality and Disease Risk A Comparative Study of Leukocyte Counts in Primates
26
Dolphin Social Complexity Lessons from LongTerm Study and Life History
32
Sources of Social Complexity in the Three Elephant Species
57
Evolution of Cooperative Strategies
87
Complex Cooperation among Tai Chimpanzees
93
Coalitionary Aggression in WhiteFaced Capuchins
111
Vocal Communication in Wild Parrots
293
Representational Vocal Signaling in the Chimpanzee
317
Social and Vocal Complexity in Bats
322
Dolphins Communicate about IndividualSpecific Social Relationships
342
Natural Semanticity in Wild Primates
362
Cultural Transmission
369
Koshima Monkeys and Bossou Chimpanzees LongTerm Research on Culture in Nonhuman Primates
374
Movement Imitation in Monkeys
388

Levels and Patterns in Dolphin Alliance Formation
115
The Social Complexity of Spotted Hyenas
121
Maternal Rank Inheritance in the Spotted Hyena
149
Is Social Stress a Consequence of Subordination or a Cost of Dominance?
153
Sperm Whale Social Structure Why It Takes a Village to Raise a Child
170
Social Cognition
175
Equivalence Classification as an Approach to Social Knowledge From Sea Lions to Simians
179
The Structure of Social Knowledge in Monkeys
207
Social Syntax The IfThen Structure of Social Problem Solving
230
Conflict Resolution in the Spotted Hyena
249
Communication
255
Laughter and Smiling The Intertwining of Nature and Culture
260
Emotional Recognition by Chimpanzees
288
Individuality and Flexibility of Cultural Behavior Patterns in Chimpanzees
392
Sex Differences in Termite Fishing among Gombe Chimpanzees
414
Ten Dispatches from the Chimpanzee Culture Wars
419
Spontaneous Use of Tools by Semifreeranging Capuchin Monkeys
440
Society and Culture in the Deep and Open Ocean The Sperm Whale and Other Cetaceans
444
Do Killer Whales Have Culture?
465
Discovering Culture in Birds The Role of Learning and Development
470
References
495
Acknowledgments
594
Contributors
601
Index
607
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