The North American Review, Volumen61

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O. Everett, 1845
Vols. 227-230, no. 2 include: Stuff and nonsense, v. 5-6, no. 8, Jan. 1929-Aug. 1930.
 

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Página 14 - ... to hold forth a lively experiment, that a most flourishing civil state may stand and best be maintained, and that among our English subjects, with a full liberty in religious concernments...
Página 293 - The ascending pile Stood fixed her stately height: and straight the doors, Opening their brazen folds, discover, wide Within, her ample spaces, o'er the smooth And level pavement; from the arched roof, Pendent by subtle magic, many a row Of starry lamps and blazing cressets, fed With naphtha and asphaltus, yielded light As from a sky.
Página 492 - Live! fear no heavier chastisement from me, Thou noteless blot on a remembered name! But be thyself, and know thyself to be! And ever at thy season be thou free To spill the venom when thy fangs o'erflow: Remorse and self-contempt shall cling to thee; Hot shame shall burn upon thy secret brow, And like a beaten hound tremble thou shalt — as now.
Página 496 - It puts the individual for the species, the one above the infinite many, might before right. A lion hunting a flock of sheep or a herd of wild asses, is a more poetical object than they ; and we even take part with the lordly beast, because our vanity, or some other feeling, makes us disposed to place ourselves in the situation of the strongest party.
Página 478 - ... that indestructible love of flowers and odours, and dews and clear waters, and soft airs and sounds, and bright skies, and woodland solitudes, and moonlight bowers, which are the Material elements of Poetry...
Página 528 - The Miscellaneous Works of Thomas Arnold, DD Late Head Master of Rugby School and Regius Professor of Modern History in the Univ. of Oxford.
Página 282 - ... designed by nature rather, to be a ship-carpenter than a great prince. This was his chief study and exercise while he stayed here; he wrought much with his own hands, and made all about him work at the models of ships.
Página 530 - A Dictionary of the English Language, containing the Pronunciation, Etymology, and Explanation of all Words authorized by Eminent Writers. To which are added, a Vocabulary of the Roots of English Words, and an accented list of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names.
Página 281 - The Czar lies next your library, and dines in the parlour next your study. He dines at 10 o'clock and 6 at night, is very seldom at home a whole day, very often in the king's yard or by water, dressed in several dresses. The king is expected there this day, the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in. The king pays for all he has...
Página 282 - Turkish empire; but he did not seem capable of conducting so great a design, though his conduct in his wars since this has discovered a greater genius in him than appeared at that time. He was desirous to understand our doctrine, but he did not seem disposed to mend matters in Moscovy.

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