Student's History of England: From the Earliest Times to 1885, Volumen1

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1892
 

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Página 46 - ... storms of rain and snow prevail abroad ; the sparrow, I say, flying in at one door, and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry storm ; but after a short space of fair weather, he immediately vanishes out of your sight, into the dark winter from which he had emerged. So this life of man appears for a short space, but of what went before, or what is to follow, we are utterly ignorant. If, therefore, this new doctrine contains something more certain, it seems justly...
Página 62 - That these things might not be forgotten, he bade his learned men bring together all that was known of the history of his people since the day when they first landed as pirates on the coast of Kent. The Chronicle, as it is called, is the earliest history which any European nation possesses in its own tongue. A Saxon house. (Harl. MS. 603.) Yet, after all, such a man as yElfred is greater for what he was than for what he did.
Página 46 - The present life of man, O king, seems to me, in comparison of that time which is unknown to us, like to the swift flight of a sparrow through the room wherein you sit at supper in winter, with your commanders and ministers, and a good fire in the midst, whilst the storms of rain and snow prevail abroad ; the sparrow, I say, flying in at one door, and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry storm ; but...
Página 112 - So very narrowly he caused it to be " traced out, that there was not a single hide, nor one virgate of land, nor even, " it is shame to tell. though it seemed to him no shame to do, an ox, nor a cow, " nor a swine was left, that was not set down.
Página 228 - Crown, shall be void and of no avail or force whatever ; but the matters which are to be established for the estate of our lord the King and of his heirs, and for the estate of the realm and of the people, shall be treated, accorded, and established in Parliaments, by our lord the King, and by the assent of the prelates, earls, and barons, and the commonalty of the realm ; according as it hath been heretofore accustomed.

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