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NOVEMBER, 1815.

Barometer.

| Thermometer. | Face of Sky. |

Winds.

- Day.

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1 30.37 | 30.37 | 30.38 | 38 | 57 33 | Clo. Fair S.W. 2 30.34 | 30.19 30.12 32 63 47 Fair Clo. W. 3 30.12 30.24 30.30 | 54 49 47 | Clo. | Clo. W. 4 30.41 | 30.42 30.44 45 48 Clo. Clo. N.E. 5 30.38 30.23 30.15 | 47 58 53 Clo. | Clo. S.W. 6 30.05 29.89 | 29.72 52 | 63 59 Clo. | Cio. S.W. 7 29.82 | 29.95 30.40 | 49 53 1 29 1 Clo. Clo. | N.W.2 8 | 30.71 30.72 | 30.72 21 44 | 28 | Fair Fair N.W. 9 30.60 30.3530.05 35 55 58 Clo. Clo. S.W.1 10 | 29.96 30.04 | 30.15 55 62 41 Clo. Clo. S.W.1 11 | 30.25 | 30.25 | 30.37 | 321 40 | 28 | Clo. Fair N.W. 12 30.51 30.51 30.52 21 37 23 Fair Fair N.1 13 30.54 30.49 | 30.49 | 24 42 23 Clo. | Fair N.2 14 30.51 30.42 30.41 23 48 28 Fair Fair S.W. 15 30.41 30.36 30.33 25 53 29 Fair Clo. S.W. 16 30.24 | 30.09 | 30.03 33 421 Clo.

N.E. 17 | 29.95 | 29.96 | 30.24 | 35 1 38 | 33 | Clo. Clo. N. 18 | 30.48 30.49 | 30.44 33 43 38 Fair Clo. N.W. 1930.38 | 30.18 | 30.10 42 42 | 37 | Clo. Clo, 2030.17 30.18 30.20 | 32 49 34 | Fair | Clo. N. 21 30.20 30.19 30.17 40 | 62 | 40 | Clo. Fair S.W. 22 | 30.13 | 29.98 | 20.8347 | 59 57 1 Clo.

Clo. S.W. 23 | 29.98 30.03 30.23 | 43 53 | 34 | Clo. Fair W. 24 30.39 | 30.40 | 30.28 30 44 35 | Fair Clo.

W. 25 | 30.13 30.15 30.22 33 47 30 | Clo. Fair | S.W. 26 30.47 | 30.46 30.52 25 | 43 25 | Fair Fair W. 27 | 30.61 | 30.61 30.56 22 44 37 Fair Clo. N.W. 28 / 30.49 | 30.44 | 30.26 36 44 40 | Clo. Clo. E. 29 30.11 29.97 29.79 36 45 43 | Clo. Clo. N.W. 30 | 29.67 | 29.76 | 29.84 | 47 | 55 ! 28 | Clo.

W. N.E. N. W. W. N.E.1 W.

E. N.W.1

E. W. W. W.

E.

W.

W.

S. 30.71 | 30.72 | 30.72 | 55 | 63 | 59 Greatest.

30.279 30.241 30.244 36.3) 48.8) 37.6 Mean. | 29.67 ( 29.70 | 29.72 | 21 | 37 23 Least.

N.W. : N.W.2

Rain on the 3d and 4th, .28 in-on the 9th, .18-on the 16th and 17th, .82-on the 19th, .79—a little on the 27th and 28th. Total, 2.07. 34.5 46 29 05 29.00 29.06] S.W.N.W. Rain. Cloudy. 28/28 34.5 31.5 25.7 136 29.42 29.50 29.56||N.W.N.W. Fair. Cloudy. 29/28 40.5 39 26 41 29.90 29.92 29.91|N.W.N.W. Fair.

[blocks in formation]

Fog.

N.W. Fog.

538 68
42 34 69
29.94|29.88 29.80|| S.W S.

Cloudy. 6157 158.5 57 40 64 29.70 29.72 29.83| w. N.W. Fair. Fair. 7|42.5 54 48.5 37.5 58.5 ||30.18 30.18|30.13||N.W. S.E. Fair. Cloudy. 8151 59 55 146 161 29,93|29,85 29.70|| S. E. S.E. Rain. Rain. 9 55.5 66 44 44 68.5 || 29.54 29.5329.60|| s.

Fair. 10142

57 52 135.2 62.5 | 29.74|29.71 29 70|| W. S. Fair. Fair. 3 11 52.5 63 58 49.5 64 5||29.68 29.70 29.77|| W. S.W. Rain. Fair. 112151 68 59.5 45 69.5 ||29.6629.66 29.80|| S.W.N.W. Fair. Fair. 1345 60 49 34 61 30.0230.00 30.04||N.W.N.W. Fair.

Fair. 1443.5 55.5 50 38 58 30.16 30.12 30.09|| W. S.W. Cloudy. Cloudy. 15/39 48 46 33 49.5 30.02 29.98 29.96 N.E.N.W. Rain. Fair. 16/34 46.7 45 27 47 30.05 30.02 29.98|| N.E. S.

Fair. Cloudy. 17 46.5 53.5 51 41.5 160 29.92 29.93 29.94|| W. S. Fair. Fair. 18|49.5 48

45 51.5|30.02|30.03|30.03|| N.E. N E. Cloudy. Cloudy. 19141 50.5 48 35.5 53 30.13 30.10 30.10|| N.E.N.E. Fair. Fair. 20|36.5 54 29 55 30.11 30.08 30.03|| N.E. S.

Fair. Fair. 21|42.5 54 49.5 33.5 57 30.10/30.0930.05|| N.E. S. Cloudy. Cloudy. 22 44.5 58 43 41 59 29.9429.85 29.75|| S.W. S.W. Fair. Fair. 23|39.5 50 48 36 54 29.82 29.76 29.73|N.W.N.W. Fair. Fair.

44 42 29 47.5||29.45 29.32 29.30 S.W.N.W. Cloudy. Cloudy. 25 41.5 48 42 36.5 49 29.50 29.56 29.59||N.W.IN.W. Cloudy. Cloudy. 26/34 45 40 45.5 ||29.6729.56 29.48||N.W. W. Fair. Cloudy. 27 36 45 42

24/37

29

Fair. 30141 45 42 28.5 45.5 ||29.84 29.74 29.78|| S.W.N.W. Kain. Cloudy. 311 4

139.5 34 119.7|41.5 30.09|30.08)30.10\N.W.IN.W.) Fair. Fair. 57 163 59.5 54 69.5||30.18 (30.18 (30.13||Greatest. 41.5 52.646.4 35.51 54.6||29.83 29.81 29.81||Mean. 24 (34.5 31.5|19.7 136 129.05 129.00 29.06||Least.

Mean temperature deduced from three observations each day 46.86" ditto maxima of heat and cold

45.06 Mean height of barometer

29.816 in. Greatest monthly range of ditto.

1.18 Rain

1.22

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15 minutes
alier sunset.
Maxlinum

of cold.
Co Maximum

of heat.

7 30 A. M.

15 minutes
after sunset.

7 30 A. M.

15 minutes
after sunset.

17 30 A. M.

| 15 minutes after sunset.

43

33

1132

43 25 49 30.12 30.1330.15|| N.E. S.W. Fair. Fair. 23 53.7 17.5 26.5 54.5 30 00 29.84 29.82| S.W. S.W. Fair. Fair. 347 42.5 42.5 47 29.96 30.04 30.08 N.E.N.E. Cloudy. Cloudy. 4|33.5 48.5 44 36 50 30.22 30.21 30.18|| N.E.S.E. Cloudy. Cloudy. 5 47.5 54 50 42.5 156 30.07 30.01 29.95 S.W. S.W. Cloudy. Cloudy. 6.50 55 43 43 56 29.74 29.60 29.57|| S.W. S. Cloudy. Cloudy. 716

49

38 50 1129.50 29.65 29.33|N.W.N.W. Cloudy. Fair. 822 34 31.5|15.2 35 30.38 30.40|30.42|N.W. S.W. | Fair. Fair. 937 16.5|43.5 30.5 18 30.26 30.15 30.04 S.W. S. Cloudy. Rain. 1052 61.5 54 146 63 29.66 29.70 29.78|| S.W.N.W. Cloudy. Fair. 11/37 36.5 33 26.5 37 30.00 30.02 30.05 N. N.W. Fair. Fair. 12/17 30 28.5 13 30.5 30.24 30.26 30.27|N.W.N.E. | Fair. Fair. 13/18 31 26.5 12.5 31 30.28 30.2230.22 N. N. Fair. Fair. 14118 39.5 34.5 u 40 30.13 30.11 30.11 W. S.W. Fair. Fair. 1521 45 38 18.5 46 30.07 30.05|30.07|| S.W. S.W. Fair. Fair. 16126 38.5 33.5 21 39 30.11|30.09 30.04||.N.E.N.E. Cloudy. Snow. 17133.5 46 40 32.5 146 29.70 29.66 29.74 N. N.W. Cloudy. Fair. 18126 40 30.5 123 41 30.20 30.22 30.24|N.W. S.W. | Fair. Cloudy. 1935 41 38.7 34 30.15 30.08 30.02|| N.E.N.E. Cloudy. Rain. 20135.5 43 40.5 33.7 43 29.91 29.92 29.97 N. N. Fair. Cloudy. 2138

43 33.7 145 29.94/29.91 29.87|| S.W. S.W. Cloudy. Cloudy. 2235 46 45.5 31 47 29.85 29.79 29.64|| W.

S.E. Fog.

Mist. 23142 51

141 52 29.70 29.75|29.92|V.W.N.W. Fair. Fair. 24 25 40 37 22 40.5 30.11 30.12 30.00|N.W. S.W. Fair. Cloudy. 2537

39 30 45 29.81 29.82 29.90||N.W.N.W. Cloudy. Fair. 26 20.5 38 33.5 19.5 38.5 30.15 30.19 29.24||N.W.N.W. Fair. Fair. 27 21 32.5 31.5 18 33 30.40 30.37|30.39||N.W. S.E. Fair. Cloudy. 2:33 42 36 5 30 43 30.26 30.20 30.12 E. (S.E. Cloudy. Cloudy. 2936 46 42 34.5 47 29.85 29.71 29.60 N. N. Mist. 301 12 147 145.5 141 148 29.4429.20 29.22|| S.E. IN.W. Rain. Cloudy.

52 (61.5154 46 63 30.40430.40 30.42||Greatest.
33.5 43.9 39.4 29.1 44.7 30.01|29.05/29.94||Mean.
17 30 126.5]11 130.5 ||29.44 29.20)29.22] Least.

Fog.

Mean temperature deduced from three observations each day 38.92 ditto

maxima of heat and cold 36.89 Mean height of barometer

29,976 in. Greatest monthly range of ditto.

1.22 Rain and snow reduced to water

1.67

1816.]

Miscellaneous and Literary Intelligence.

281

MISCELLANEOUS AND LITERARY INTELLIGENCE.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY.

Abiel Smith Esq. who died in November last, an opulent merchant in Boston, and a graduate of the University in 1764bequeathed ten thousand dollars, six per cent. stock of the United States, and twenty thousand dollars three per cent to the University, towards maintaining a teacher or professor of the French and Spanish languages, or of the French language alone, as the government of the University should see fit.

SUBJECTS OF BOWDOIN PRIZE DISSERTATIONS FOR 1816.

1. The Christian Doctrine of Faith. 2. The reciprocal influence of literature and morals. 3. The importance of commerce as a source of private and

publick wealth. 4. The characteristicks of the Greek language. 5. The Iliad.

Six premiums (three first and three second) will be assigned, if so many dissertations of sufficient merit shall be offered. Candidates will mention their standing, as Resident Graduates or Undergraduates ; and if Undergraduates, of what class. The performances must be in the hands of the President by the end of June.

The first premium is thirty dollars, or a gold medal of that value-and the second twenty dollars, or a gold medal of that value.

The prizes in 1815, were assigned in July last as follows: A second premium to Thomas Savage, A. B. for a Dissertation on the question, 66 Whether the Greek Article be used with so much precision by the writers of the New Testament, that inferences may be drawn from it in favour of important doctrines.”

A first premium to Jared Sparks, of the Senior class, for a dissertation “ On the character of Sir Isaac Newton, and the influence, and importance of his discoveries.”

A second premium to John D. Crocker, of the Senior class Subject-The practical utility of the Philosophy of the mind.

To Justin W. Clark, a Junior-Subject—" The present Age."

To John Everett, of the Freshman class—Subject— The distinguishing excellencies of the Hebrew."

The Corporation, with the assent of the Overseers, have invited the co-operation of the friends of the College, in their design to extend the means of Theological education at the University.

Vol. II. No. 6. 36

THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY.

The Corporation of Harvard College have thought it their duty, to adopt measures for increasing the means of Theological Education at the University. In order to enable Students in Divinity to reap the benefit of the eminent advantages which the College possesses for this purpose, there is need of funds for assisting meritorious Students of limited means to reside in Cambridge for a requisite time:-Of one or more Professors, whose attention may be exclusively given to this class of students; and of a separate building.

The Corporation are disposed and determined to apply the resources of the college to this object, as far as other indispensable claims admit. But these resources being entirely incompetent to the accomplishment of their views, they feel it incumbent upon them to call upon the Friends of the University, and of the Christian Ministry, to co-operate with them in this interestiug design.

As the best method of obtaining the assistance of the liberal and pious, it is proposed to form a Society " for the education of candidates for the ministry in Cambridge University." All persons who shall subseribe five dollars a year shall be members, and continue such so long as they shall pay the said annual sum: -Clergymen paying two dollars a year to be corsidered as members.

All persons subscribing One Hundred Dollars to be considered members of the said society for life. Subscriptions for smaller sums, either as annual payments or as donations, will be thankfully received.

Whilst annual and life subscriptions are desired, it is hoped, that affluent friends of the College, and of the Churches, will by donations and bequests, do justice to the noble objects of Christian munificence here presented.

The Corporation are induced to believe, that a large number of persons in the metropolis and in various parts of this Commonwealth will view this invitation with favour ;-as an occasion for doing what many of them have anxiously wished to see accomplished.

Thinking the importance of the subject gives it a claim to appear under respectable auspices, the Corporation have ventured to place on the Committees the names of a number of distinguished Sons and Friends of the University, who are requested to take charge of the papers for subscription.

Clergymen are not named on these Committees, being considered as engaged by the nature of their office to afford their assistance, and being separately desired in their respective congregations and circles to promote the pious design.

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