Reports of the Commissioners of the United States to the International Exhibition

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Chemical composition of the berry
9
Table of analysis
10
Distribution of material in the
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Phosphoric acid in the
12
Constituents of the
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Proportion of
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Source of mineral ingredients of flour
15
Proximate chemical ingredients of the berry
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Gluten
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Starch
18
Vegetable albumen
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Sugar and dextrine
20
Vegetable fibrine and caseine
21
Gluten
22
Oil
23
24 Cerealine
24
Water
25
Proximate analysis
26
Effect of climate and other influences
27
Nitrogenous bodies their composition
28
Sulphates and phosphates
29
TOWERCLOCKS
36
PECULIARITIES OF THE TOWERCLOCK
37
THE GREAT WESTMINSTER CLOCK
38
OTHER CLOCKS
39
Ventilation 96 Cooling
42
Effect of distance of rolls apart 101 Advantages of cylindermilling 102 Wegmanns walzmühle 103 The porcelain cylindermill
44
Results of harvesting and grinding Banat and Australian
45
European varieties
46
Structure of the plant
47
Prevention of heating
48
Method of thrashing
49
American devices used in Austria
50
Diseases and enemies of wheat
51
Impurities
52
Winnowing and separating
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Removal of oats
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Separating light grains
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Separating round seeds
56
Another method
57
A third device
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Inspection of wheat
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Removal of smut and dirt
60
Removal of beard and bran Bentzs method
61
Smutmachines
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Scourer 64 Hardiness of Hungarian wheat o CHAPTER II
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Effect of blows and of pressure on the grain
65
Older methods of inilling
66
Origin of high milling Vienna grits
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Ignaz Paur his method
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Paurs apparatus
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Difference between high and low milling
70
Jury classification
71
High milling detailed description
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Grades of product
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The characteristic of high milling
74
Unpurified grits or middlings
75
Finer products of grinding
76
166
77
Bran
78
Constitution and peculiarities of the flour
79
Effect of sharpness of cutting edges
80
Apparatus required in the process
81
Alcoholic fermentation dependent on dynamic condition 183 Brefelds results of research upon alcoholic fermentation 184 Effects of fermentation 18...
85
Action of limewater in improving texture of dough 187 Problem of a yeastbread 188 The pressyeast of Mautner 189 Production of pressyeast from 1...
87
Zettlers mode 193 Pumpernickel of Westphalia
88
Mège Mouriess method
91
218
98
230
104
Phosphatic bread
111
Paurs purifier
112
Purifier used at Pesth
113
Another device
114
Products of the two processes of milling
115
Physical differences in wheat
116
Gluten percentage in various flours 31 Gluten its chemical constitution 32 Dextrine and its homologues
117
Condition of phosphorus in the grain 34 Varieties of wheat 35 Peculiarities of various flours 36 Hungarian wheat
118
Millstones
119
Nitrogen its proportion affected by climate 38 Climate of Hungary 39 Phosphoric acid varies with nitrogen
120
Comparison of Victorian with Hungarian wheat
121
Ρ Α R T III
1
Constituents of plantfood
3
METHOD OF MAKING AWARDS
5
LIST OF EXHIBITORS RECEIVING AWARDS
6
SCIENTIFIC IMPROVEMENT ORIGINATING IN THE UNITED STATES
7
VENEZUELAN AND BRAZILIAN EXHIBITS
8
GREAT BRITAIN CHARACTER OF EXHIBITS
9
WORTHLEYS METHOD
10
c
11
0
15
65
36
67
37
Redness of color in wheat its cause
41
Hungarian grain its characteristics
42
Table of varieties of Hungarian wheat
43
American photography
5
PIIOSPHATIC MANURES
6
BRITISH COLONIES 10
10
AROZA OF ST CLOUD 11
11
ROUSSELONS PHOTOENGRAVING PROCESS 12
12
PHOTOGRAPHING IN COLORS VIDALS DISCOVERY 13
13
ITALY CHARACTER OF EXHIBITS V Hub 33 ALETOSCOPES MOONLIGHT PHOTOGRAPHS 34 PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY OF BOLOGNA
14
SWEDEN 36 NORWAY Or er er or 37 DENMARK
15
BELGIUM PECULIARITIES OF EXHIBITS 39 MONCKHOVENS TRAITÉGÉNÉRAL DE PHOTOGRAPHIE 40 NETHERLANDS 16
16
CARBON PRINTS AND PHOTOLITHOGRAPHS 17
17
ALBERTS PROCESS
25
RUSSIA
26
Page
3
General character of exhibit
3
Balances
9
SWISS INSTRUMENTS
15
BAROMETERS PILLISCHERS ANEROID
16
VALUE OF ANEROID BAROMETERS
17
THE MERCURIAL BAROMETER KAPPELERS
18
ELECTRICAL DEEPSEA THERMOMETER BY SIEMEN
19
THE RESISTANCETHERMOMETER
20
THE SOUNDINGLINE
21
THE ELECTRICALBRIDGE
22
THE BALANCETHERMOMETER
23
HISTORY OF THE NATIONAL PRINTINGOFFICE
24
LOCATION EXTENT ARRANGEMENT
25
CHARACTER OF THE WORK DONE
26
NUMBER OF EMPLOYÉS
27
EMPLOYMENT OF WOMEN WAGES HOURS OF WORK
28
WORKS IN PRESS
29
RAPIDITY OF EXECUTION
30
THE PRESSES
31
BINDING SUPPLIES
32
Special exhibits
42
WOODBURYTYPES
47
BRAUNS CARBON PRINTS
48
OBERNETTERS CARBON PROCESS
49
AUSTRIA CHARACTER OF EXHIBITS
50
GREECE
82
Motion of the stone
83
Description of the stone
84
Arrangement of lands and grooves
85
Use of the grooves
86
Form used in the United States
87
Instruments and systems
3
Surgery
5
13
13
28
21
MONOPOLY OF THE TELEGRAPH
27
State of telegraphy in the United States
33
THE EXHIBITED NOT GENERALLY CREDITABLE
34
TYPESETTING MACHINE
35
THE WALTER PRESS STEREOTYPING
36
Measuring apparatus
38
EXHIBITS
41
MICROSCOPES RECENT ADVANCES
42
BRANCHLINES
43
AMICIS DEVICE
44
The cradle and the crèche
3
Salles dAsyle
11
CHAPTER III
15
Physiological infantschool
22
COMPARISON WITH OTHER METHODS
25
ORIGIN OF SUCH EDUCATION IN THE PRINCIPLES ENUNCIATED BY PEREIRE
32
ܘ 1
37
ENGLISH SCHOOLS ESSEX HALL
38
THE PROPER SYSTEM OF TELEGRAPHLINES
42
Education and training of the senses
43
The Spanish French school
49
TURKEY
55
ROUMANIA
56
EGYPT
57
JAPAN CHINA
58
SANDWICH ISLANDS
59
URUGUAY
60
The Abbé de lEpée and his time
64
European schools for idiots
75
American schools for idiots
88
Various forms of grooves
89
Influence of form and arrangement
90
Dimensions adopted
91
Brooklyn millstones
92
The Thilenius millstone
93
The school as it is and as it should
99
101
101
102
102
103
103
104
104
105
105
106
106
108
108
CHAPTER II
111
CHAPTER III
113
EDUCATION OF THE SENSES
115
EDUCATION OF THE MEDICAL SENSES
116
EDUCATION OF THE INDUSTRIAL SENSES
117
EDUCATION OF THE LANGUAGE
119
SPECIAL TEACHING GEOGRAPHY
122
The scholar his textbooks and teachers
123
116
131
122
132
PHYSIOLOGICAL EDUCATION
134
LAST LOOK AT TIIE WELTAUSSTELLUNG 75 LESSONS FROM THE WELTAUSSTELLUNG 76 WILL THEY PROFIT OUR SCHOOL? 77 SE...
136
123
137
Education at Paris and Vienna
3
BRITISH INDIA
7
40
12
OTHER COUNTRIES
19
textbooks 24
24
Work of the jury
26
Organization 28
28
129
29
Q RESULTS OF EDUCATIONAL REPRESENTATION 49 Value of example and competition
32
Comparison of principles and methods 51 Importance to the United States 52 Deficiencies of American education
35
CONCLUSION
3
Arrangement of exhibits
5
WORKINGPLAN
10
Chromolithography
3
TRUE ART APPRECIATED BY
15
Characteristics of Oriental printing
20
THE APPROACHING CENTENNIAL INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OFFERS
21
APPENDIX
27
GOVERNMENTAL PATRONAGE OF
29
National printing office of France
5
14
6

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Página 62 - It will be safe to infer, however, from the above results, that there is no river in the United Kingdom long enough to effect the destruction of sewage by oxidation.
Página 61 - In fact, whether we examine the organic' pollution of a river at different points of its flow, or the rate of disappearance of the organic matter of sewage when the latter is. mixed with fresh water and violently agitated in contact with air, or finally, the rate at which dissolved oxygen disappears in water polluted with five per cent...
Página 61 - ... per cent of sewage, we are led, in each case, to the inevitable conclusion that the oxidation of the organic matter in sewage proceeds with extreme slowness, even when the sewage is mixed with a large volume of unpolluted water, and that it is impossible to say how far such water must flow before the sewage matter becomes thoroughly oxidised.
Página 62 - ... discharged from another's bowels ; that, in short, the diffusion of cholera among us depends entirely upon the numberless filthy facilities which are let exist, and especially in our larger towns, for the fouling of earth and air and water, and thus secondarily for the infection of man, with whatever contagium may be contained in the miscellaneous outflowings of the population.
Página 43 - ... the trade in superphosphates, guano and similar commercial fertilizers began. The same stupendous frauds by adulteration and dilution of good things were practiced there as they have been and, we have great reason to fear, still are carried on here. But the experiment station has perfectly cured and rooted out these evils in all the districts where it has been established and appreciated. The experiment station there is prepared to furnish the farmers at small cost with an analysis of any fertilizer...
Página 15 - The paper being drawn or written upon with lithographic ink, is, when finished, put for a few minutes between damp blotting-paper; a warmed stone is put in the press, the sheet...
Página 118 - ... thought can be brought together to produce a harmonious result in the development of a human being is the problem in the educational world of to-day. We may fill the mind with useful ideas and beautiful thoughts, but " the hand alone can give precision and durability to the simplest ideas after all. When the mind is active and the hand inapt ideas run to waste, therefore,
Página 23 - The Physiological Infant-School will result from the union of the kind training .of the Salle d'Asyle and the joyous exercises of the Kindergarten, with the application of physiology to education. None will question the opportuneness of this intellectual movement ; but one may hesitate to predict where it will succeed best. Germany had the start, but failed to comprehend the entirety of the idea, either in general education, when Pestalozzi and Froebel mangled the " Emile," or in special education,...
Página 7 - ... often mistaken for natural sleep. Psychologically viewed, the decoration of the cradle is of equal moment. To surround an infant with highly wrought or colored figures often grotesque, or at least untrue to nature, may, by day, attract more attention than his faculties of perception can safely bestow, hence fatigue of the brain or worse...
Página 115 - Eating, cutting, brushing, and the menial services which the hand performs as a domestic of the body, must be intrusted to the left, even drawing, writing, and a few automatic games and exercises, like spading, sawing, at the same time that the lacing, buckling, buttoning of the garments must be altered to be worked by that hand. By the second and more general device, it would be well to have the schoolarrangements, as the doors and windows, altered and disposed to be moved by left-handling, so that...

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